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It really bothers me that most of the powerbars and drinks contain that high fructose corn syrup. I absolutely try to avoid that in all normal food, but it seems that all the endurance food and drinks contain it. What's up with that!?
 

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Praetorian27 said:
I have. That's why I posted. I'm not referring to the flavors. The labels don't say anything except daily percentages. Are some supposed to be daily intake bars whether you are exercising or not? While others are for intake during exercise?
And they show the amounts and ingredients.

Do you need more protein? Eat those bars.
Do you need more carbs? Eat those bars. IF you need sugar look for sugar in them.
Do you need more fiber? Eat the ones high in fiber.

Do you want them labeled like "pre-ride, post-ride,recovery, bedtime, waking, lunch" ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I guess what I am looking for is what are the benefits of what one bar provides over another. I am fairly new to the road scene (a couple of years) and am starting to get serious about it this season. I don't have a personal trainer or a dietician. I am looking to find out what the benefits of a carb bar...or a protein bar. When should one be eaten instead of another?
 

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If you're looking for something to eat in the middle of a 4-hour ride, choose the one with the highest grams of carbs, the lowest grams of fat, and don't get the high-fiber ones. Almost any of them will be okay before or after the ride. And don't eat them at all any other time.
 

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Eat food

Praetorian27 said:
I guess what I am looking for is what are the benefits of what one bar provides over another. I am fairly new to the road scene (a couple of years) and am starting to get serious about it this season. I don't have a personal trainer or a dietician. I am looking to find out what the benefits of a carb bar...or a protein bar. When should one be eaten instead of another?
None of these bars offer anything that is not available from eating food. As others have said, during a ride, you want to focus on carbs. A little protein won't hurt, but a lot of protein is not that good during exercise. Nancy Clark has published some good books on exercise nutrtion, and the book Food For Sport (Smith) has been a standard for many years. While there is ONE study that says that 4:1 carbs:protein is better for recovery than pure carbs, most exercise scientists would actually suggest something more like 10:1 (IOW, a bit of protein and mostly carbs). That one study only compared that one ratio of carbs to protein, it didn't study a range of ratios, and yet there's an entire family of products based on that one study. At any rate, these bars are high priced food, though you may find them convenient.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Kerry Irons said:
None of these bars offer anything that is not available from eating food. As others have said, during a ride, you want to focus on carbs. A little protein won't hurt, but a lot of protein is not that good during exercise. Nancy Clark has published some good books on exercise nutrtion, and the book Food For Sport (Smith) has been a standard for many years. While there is ONE study that says that 4:1 carbs:protein is better for recovery than pure carbs, most exercise scientists would actually suggest something more like 10:1 (IOW, a bit of protein and mostly carbs). That one study only compared that one ratio of carbs to protein, it didn't study a range of ratios, and yet there's an entire family of products based on that one study. At any rate, these bars are high priced food, though you may find them convenient.
Thanks for the info! I'll look into those Clark books!
 

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Seems to me the main advantage is you can toss 250 calories in your jersey and not worry about it getting in the way. My approach is to find newer products- for example Gatorade was made many many years ago and is not the type of drink powder that someone who is training for anything serious should use (the GNC stuff is good). Newer formulations will be based on more recent studies (well that is what they tell us anyway).

Best tasting bar is the Cliff- chocolate almond fudge- I could eat those every day of the week and not get sick of them and they helped on a few hard centuries..............MTT
 

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SuperB said:
It really bothers me that most of the powerbars and drinks contain that high fructose corn syrup. I absolutely try to avoid that in all normal food, but it seems that all the endurance food and drinks contain it. What's up with that!?
High Fructose Corn Syrup is incredibly cheap, versatile filler for most sugary drinks and snack foods. Take a look at 90% of the products at 7-11, and you'll see it high on the list.

It's also considered a leading cause of obesity and diabetes, and should be avoided as much as possible. Powerbars contain lots of HFCS, Clif Bars none at all.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/ac2/wp-dyn/A8003-2003Mar10?language=printer

Read your labels!

Jim
 

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Marketing.

Praetorian27 said:
I see the PowerBar Harvest...Triple Threat...Protein Plus...etc. What is the difference if any?
Expanding their base to different target audiences (Protein: Weight lifters. Pria: Women. Triple Threat: People who like candy bars but feel better about eating a PowerBar.)

Personally, I like powerbars and alternate btween those and Clif. Consumer choice is a good thing!
 

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Seamus said:
High Fructose Corn Syrup is incredibly cheap, versatile filler for most sugary drinks and snack foods. Take a look at 90% of the products at 7-11, and you'll see it high on the list. It's also considered a leading cause of obesity and diabetes, and should be avoided as much as possible. Powerbars contain lots of HFCS, Clif Bars none at all.
Chill out. HFCS is just another source of sugar. It causes obesity and diabetes just like any excess of calories will. The fact that Powerbars have it and Clif Bars don't says nothing about the nutritional value of either one. There is NOTHING inherent in HFCS compared to any other sugar (including maltodextrin) that makes it good or bad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
PseuZQ said:
Expanding their base to different target audiences (Protein: Weight lifters. Pria: Women. Triple Threat: People who like candy bars but feel better about eating a PowerBar.)

Personally, I like powerbars and alternate btween those and Clif. Consumer choice is a good thing!
THAT'S what I was looking for! Thanks!!
 
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