Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
257 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back in July I got a set of Vredestin Fortezza Tricomps to replace the OEM Specialized Mondo Pro IIs I had since I got the bike in 2008(Spec Tarmac Comp). I had no complaints on the Specs, but they were the only tires I had ever had, so I didn't have anything else to base anything on. They were $40 from Spec's website and I didn't feel like paying that much
I got the Vredestein's on sale for like $30 each shipped. In some pictures on the internet these tires are treaded in the middle and in some they are not. The ones I got were slightly treaded.

I had been visibly improving all season until I got the Vreds. From that time I haven't had a good ride. I've been getting dropped on rides I was finishing with the top guys. There are really only 2 changes I can attribute that too:
1. The weather: I live in Atlanta where it was over 95 everyday for a month and half.
2. The tires.

When I first put the tires on I could feel a significant difference in the ride. It was much softer. Don't know whether that was because the OEMs were 3 years old or whether it was actually a characteristic of the Vreds. I also noticed the profile of the Vreds was flatter whereas the Specs were much more ovoid in profile. There is visibily more tire in contact with the road at any given time. I’m 127lbs so I'm pretty light and not hugely powerful from an absolute perspective.
This could be totally mental in cycling, but coming from inline speedskating for 15 years a "softer skating" wheel is more grippy and has noticeably less roll(slower) AND the less ovoid shaped the wheel was the less roll(slower) as well. On a good floor I could tell the difference between just changing one wheel from a high grip wheel to a high roll wheel.

So, last week I got a flat before a ride, but didn't have time to change the tube, so I just took the front wheel off my wife's bike and used that instead. She has the same bike as me, but with stock rims(Shimano RS10s or something). I was back to normal. I could feel the road much more now(aka more bumpy), but it felt as if the bike rolled better, even with just one tire(front) as a Spec and the rear as the Vred. BUT, the weather was much cooler, so again I don't know which variable caused the change.

1. Can the profile of a tire affect a ride that much?
2. Is there that much of a difference in the rolling resistance between 2 tires
3. If 1 and 2 are a yes, would that difference be significant between the 2 I was using?


Thanks,
Craig
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,585 Posts
Short answers

csh8428 said:
1. Can the profile of a tire affect a ride that much?
2. Is there that much of a difference in the rolling resistance between 2 tires
3. If 1 and 2 are a yes, would that difference be significant between the 2 I was using?
1. not with the tires you're comparing
2. not with the tires you're comparing
3. no

I'll go with the weather and/or overtraining/dehydration.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,317 Posts
yes, there is a difference in feeling between "soft" tires such as the Specialized Mondos, and Mich PR3's and "hard" tires such as GP4000's and Gatorskins.

the soft tires are just that... soft. they wear faster, and flat and cut easier. But they feel soft when riding, which CAN be a good thing to some.

My gp4000's supposedly have pretty good flat protection
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,224 Posts
135 psi is a lot of air for someone 127 lbs. You would be well served to back that off to 100 psi or so. It will help comfort and rolling resistance.

I have not riden either tire you mention, but I have heard good things about the Tricomps. There is no way that changing from one tire to the other would make the difference of getting dropped or not. In my opinion you upgraded by going from the Specialized to the Tricomps. You went from a lower range 120tpi tire to a mid-upper range 220 tpi tire.

Given the difference in TPI and the high pressure you are pumping to that you would feel a much harsher ride with the Mondo's. It might "feel" fast, but that feel is deceiving.

Check this out on tire pressure:

http://www.vintagebicyclepress.com/images/TireDrop.pdf
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top