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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is the cassette from my Cannondale Synapse 5 w Shimano 105, that has 2500 miles on it. I took it in to the shop, and they said the chain and cassette need replacing. I agreed on the chain solely because of the mileage, but the cassette didn't look that bad. The mechanic stated he could replace the chain only, but the worn cogs will cause the chain to wear out quicker.

This is opposite of what I've read here, which seems to be the first of many contradictions I'm having with the shop.

Does this thing need replacing? If so, will a higher end Ultegra last longer than a 105? Or is it just a difference in weight?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thats what I've read here, multiple times by many different members, but they said if my cassette is worn, the chain won't last for another 1,000 miles!

They also said my RS 10 wheels are fine, and will hold my 235# body just fine. And spending money on a set of Easton 70's with a higher spoke count would be a waste. Now I'm questioning that fact too...
 

· 'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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your shop is right...while that cassette isn't 'worn-out', if you throw a new chain on there, it will wear very quickly to match the wear on the cassette, thus reducing the overall lifespan of the chain. if you check the wear on the chain w/ a ruler and not a pretty much useless 'chain checker' you'll be able to most accurately gauge wear. if you change chains at 1/16" of wear or slightly more, you'll be able to go thru many chains on that cassette. you can go longer, but the chains just won't last as long and the neither will the cassette. for what it's worth, shimano chains seem to wear the fastest, seems like high-end sram & campy last lots longer (i believe they're both made in the same factory, not that that makes any difference:D ).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks, I guess it just shocked me to think that they wanted to replace it after 2500 miles. But if I get 1500 to 2000 miles on this new chain, then I'll be ready to replace both parts next time.

When I do replace the parts, I'll definitely look into the SRAM or Campy chain. Are there different cassettes that would last longer than others?
 

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bubbad3 said:
Thats what I've read here, multiple times by many different members, but they said if my cassette is worn, the chain won't last for another 1,000 miles!

They also said my RS 10 wheels are fine, and will hold my 235# body just fine. And spending money on a set of Easton 70's with a higher spoke count would be a waste. Now I'm questioning that fact too...
the best, most durable wheels for you would be 32/36, butted (or bladed...like dt aerolites or sapim c x-ray) w/ brass nipples and either a box section rim or a low aero section (velocity aerohead), built by someone w/ years of experience. hub choice is yours, well made cartridge bearing hubs are great, so are loose ball hubs like shimano or campy. then mount some 25mm tires and ride...
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
cxwrench said:
the best, most durable wheels for you would be 32/36, butted (or bladed...like dt aerolites or sapim c x-ray) w/ brass nipples and either a box section rim or a low aero section (velocity aerohead), built by someone w/ years of experience. hub choice is yours, well made cartridge bearing hubs are great, so are loose ball hubs like shimano or campy. then mount some 25mm tires and ride...
I'm riding on Conti 4000's now, in 25mm. That was the first thing I read here, and had those tires installed when I bought the bike. Thanks for the detailed wheel info. That will help alot when it comes time for a new wheelset.

What type of cost are we looking at for something like you have described?

I live in Norcal if that helps at all.
 

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bubbad3 said:
Thats what I've read here, multiple times by many different members, but they said if my cassette is worn, the chain won't last for another 1,000 miles!

They also said my RS 10 wheels are fine, and will hold my 235# body just fine. And spending money on a set of Easton 70's with a higher spoke count would be a waste. Now I'm questioning that fact too...
Both points could be true, but I think they're stretching a bit...The chain will wear, yes, because new chain + worn cassette will wear faster than new chain + new cassette, but it's nothing too urgent for buying a new cassette.

Those RS 10's appear to be holding you up, but down the road they're not the best option. Shop sounds like they just want you to ride them out, get the worry off your chest. And who knows, maybe you're on top of taking care of your set very well when riding.

I'm guessing the shop just tried to drop knowledge in case you never knew about that stuff. Otherwise, if they knew you were reasonably knowledgeable about such topics (not an insult), they'd never mention it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
That is entirely possible. My knowledge about road bikes was zero a year ago. When I first test rode one, I had to ask where the shifters were, as I didn't see them near the stem. I've been in the shop tons of times, asking them all sorts of questions, and do exhaustive searches here, looking for answers before I post. Which is why I'm surprised about the cassette wear.
As for the wheels, I do some pretty nice climbs, and always have these wheels in the back of my mind when cruising back downhill. Peace of mind is a driving force for the wheelset questions.
But you're right, the guys at the shop are always giving me advice, as well as options, and they are a great group. It's just in my nature to research everything, so I end up comparing alot of what they say to things posted here.

On the next cassette, I'll plan on using the 3 chain rotation system, and measure each chain more often.
 

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wrong...

cxwrench said:
your shop is right...while that cassette isn't 'worn-out', if you throw a new chain on there, it will wear very quickly to match the wear on the cassette, thus reducing the overall lifespan of the chain. if you check the wear on the chain w/ a ruler and not a pretty much useless 'chain checker' you'll be able to most accurately gauge wear. if you change chains at 1/16" of wear or slightly more, you'll be able to go thru many chains on that cassette. you can go longer, but the chains just won't last as long and the neither will the cassette. for what it's worth, shimano chains seem to wear the fastest, seems like high-end sram & campy last lots longer (i believe they're both made in the same factory, not that that makes any difference:D ).
If a new chain is installed on used cogs and it does not skip while pedaling under a heavy load, there is no reason to change the cassette. It absolutely will NOT reduce the chain life. It's the other way around. As a chains elongates and the pitch increases, it wears the cogs more quickly.

Rather than trash chains prematurely, at 1/16" elongation, I use 3-4 chains in a rotation. You can use the chains far longer, get more miles with fewer chains and never have to worry about chain skip. The trick is to keep about the same amount of wear on all of the chains.

Campy chains are made by Campy, not SRAM. Sachs used to make Campy chains, but that's changed over 10 years ago.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
C-40 said:
If a new chain is installed on used cogs and it does not skip while pedaling under a heavy load, there is no reason to change the cassette. It absolutely will NOT reduce the chain life. It's the other way around. As a chains elongates and the pitch increases, it wears the cogs more quickly.

Rather than trash chains prematurely, at 1/16" elongation, I use 3-4 chains in a rotation. You can use the chains far longer, get more miles with fewer chains and never have to worry about chain skip. The trick is to keep about the same amount of wear on all of the chains.

Campy chains are made by Campy, not SRAM. Sachs used to make Campy chains, but that's changed over 10 years ago.

Is it too late to start the chain rotation on this cassette? My thoughts were to use one chain until it's worn, then apply that method once I replace it and start over with new components.
 

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The only thing a worn cassette will do to a chain is make shifting slow, or if severely worn, possibly skip as C-40 said. I'd bet you can get a lot more than 6000 miles out of a cassette. Think about the simple mechanics of it. How can a worn cassette ruin a chain? They don't stretch like a chain does. The same goes with cranks.
Ask that tech to prove how, and explain it, other than saying he's heard that it happens. He won't be able to give you a factual answer.
 

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Oh, I forgot too.. At 2500 miles, your chain is most likely worn out, but don't use those chain measurement tools at shops. They show new chains as being worn too! Ask them to put that tool on a brand new bike in their shop...
 

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Me thinks that you need to start looking for a new bike shop.

2500 miles is nothing, for a cassette. The best way to tell if your cassette is worn out is after the third chain change, the chain starts to skip on the cogs you use the most.

If you lube your chain often, and keep it clean, it will last much longer than you think it would. If you abuse it, you should only get 2500 to 3500 miles out of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Peanya said:
Oh, I forgot too.. At 2500 miles, your chain is most likely worn out, but don't use those chain measurement tools at shops. They show new chains as being worn too! Ask them to put that tool on a brand new bike in their shop...
Yeah, I made a mistake there. I've read about measuring the chain with a 12" ruler, and did it a while ago, but this time, I figured it had enough miles that I'd just replace it without checking first. By the time I got home and thought about it, they had thrown the chain out, and I didn't want to go dumpster divin' to measure it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
MR_GRUMPY said:
Me thinks that you need to start looking for a new bike shop.

2500 miles is nothing, for a cassette. The best way to tell if your cassette is worn out is after the third chain change, the chain starts to skip on the cogs you use the most.

If you lube your chain often, and keep it clean, it will last much longer than you think it would. If you abuse it, you should only get 2500 to 3500 miles out of it.

Went out and pounded some hills today, using the 1st 2nd and 3rd ring, and no skipping. Glad this forum is here, you all saved me a hundred bucks.

When I first bought the bike, I wasn't cleaning the chain enough, but now I'm in a routine where I clean it after every long ride, or every 2 short rides.

I think the shop will be ok, since they give me a nice discount with every purchase for being a return customer. And they'll match any price I find online, and do things like simple tune-ups for free. But I'm getting to the point where I'll start telling them what to do, instead of asking.
 

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C-40 said:
If a new chain is installed on used cogs and it does not skip while pedaling under a heavy load, there is no reason to change the cassette. It absolutely will NOT reduce the chain life. It's the other way around. As a chains elongates and the pitch increases, it wears the cogs more quickly.

Rather than trash chains prematurely, at 1/16" elongation, I use 3-4 chains in a rotation. You can use the chains far longer, get more miles with fewer chains and never have to worry about chain skip. The trick is to keep about the same amount of wear on all of the chains.

Campy chains are made by Campy, not SRAM. Sachs used to make Campy chains, but that's changed over 10 years ago.
normally you give good, sound advice...but of course a new chain used w/ a somewhat worn cassette will reduce the overall lifespan of the chain. a NEW chain and a NEW cassette will get the longest life, obviously. if your cassette was used w/ a chain that had 2000mi on it, the new chain will quickly wear to that point, then begin wearing the cassette again.
 

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cxwrench said:
normally you give good, sound advice...but of course a new chain used w/ a somewhat worn cassette will reduce the overall lifespan of the chain. a NEW chain and a NEW cassette will get the longest life, obviously. if your cassette was used w/ a chain that had 2000mi on it, the new chain will quickly wear to that point, then begin wearing the cassette again.
I always thought the cass wears when the chain is old/stretched. Isn't it as far as cost like 5 chains to a cass?
 
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