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I know its dirty - but based on my experience the teeth start looking like shark fins when they wear, as opposed to being flat like these. My bike shop wants to replace it - the chain was worn as my tool showed - but I dont think this cassette is worn at all. Around 2500 miles on it. Lots on flat roads in Florida. This shop has ripped me off before.

Ant tips for cleaning it without removing it - besides just a thin towel with degreaser on it which doesnt reach much.

Thanks
 

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I know its dirty - but based on my experience the teeth start looking like shark fins when they wear, as opposed to being flat like these. My bike shop wants to replace it - the chain was worn as my tool showed - but I dont think this cassette is worn at all. Around 2500 miles on it. Lots on flat roads in Florida. This shop has ripped me off before.

Ant tips for cleaning it without removing it - besides just a thin towel with degreaser on it which doesnt reach much.

Thanks
Yeah, the teeth look fine to me. They make scrub brushes for cassettes. Or, you can floss between the rings. I would avoid degreaser.
 

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I know its dirty - but based on my experience the teeth start looking like shark fins when they wear, as opposed to being flat like these. My bike shop wants to replace it - the chain was worn as my tool showed - but I dont think this cassette is worn at all. Around 2500 miles on it. Lots on flat roads in Florida. This shop has ripped me off before.

Ant tips for cleaning it without removing it - besides just a thin towel with degreaser on it which doesnt reach much.
Put on the new chain. If the chain "jumps" in certain cogs, then those cogs are worn out. Not likely the case after 2500 miles. The shop may just want to avoid you coming back and complaining. To fully clean the cassette you need a lock ring tool and chain whip so you can take off all the cogs and clean them. Otherwise, a rag or a rag damp with solvent can be used to floss between the cogs. That's as clean as it will get without disassembly.
 

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The cassette looks fine. To test if a cassette is too worn I install the new chain and shift into each of the smallest 3 cogs and go out and stand on it (standing sprint torque) to see if it skips. In my case the answer is almost always yes as soon as the chain starts to wear. My wife's bike can go through 4 chains in a row with the same cassette.

My favorite tool for cleaning the cassette on the bike is this: Amazon.com: Grunge Brush Chain: Gear and Chain Cleaning Tool, Red: Sports & Outdoors
Spray everything down with simple green, scrub and repeat as long as your OCD requires.
 

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Put on the new chain. If the chain "jumps" in certain cogs, then those cogs are worn out. Not likely the case after 2500 miles. The shop may just want to avoid you coming back and complaining. To fully clean the cassette you need a lock ring tool and chain whip so you can take off all the cogs and clean them. Otherwise, a rag or a rag damp with solvent can be used to floss between the cogs. That's as clean as it will get without disassembly.
...and disassembly is really unnecessary, as cassettes don't need to be that clean.
 
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...and disassembly is really unnecessary, as cassettes don't need to be that clean.
^^^This. Give that cassette a good floss while it's still on the wheel. Forget the fancy cleaning tools.
 

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His cassette is filthy! OMG, I have no idea what he is putting on it, unbelievable.
... and it is also all over his chain. I would just get a new bike.
 

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His cassette is filthy! OMG, I have no idea what he is putting on it, unbelievable.
... and it is also all over his chain. I would just get a new bike.
@duriel , you never fail to disappoint.
 
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<iframe width="560" height="315" src="
" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>

KMC makes one also.
 

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<iframe width="560" height="315" src="
" title="YouTube video player" frameborder="0" allow="accelerometer; autoplay; clipboard-write; encrypted-media; gyroscope; picture-in-picture" allowfullscreen></iframe>

KMC makes one also.
One more unnecessary tool. Reminds me of the weather rock..
 

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Is it skipping now? If not I would just keep riding. Cassette does not look worn. As long as everything is working fine I would keep riding, especially if they are telling you to replace everything now. If a new chain skips I would remove it and save the chain, throw the the old one back on and keep riding the gear that is working just fine currently. Then when everything is actually worn out spend the 150-400 bucks at that time.
 

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Is it skipping now? If not I would just keep riding. Cassette does not look worn. As long as everything is working fine I would keep riding, especially if they are telling you to replace everything now. If a new chain skips I would remove it and save the chain, throw the the old one back on and keep riding the gear that is working just fine currently. Then when everything is actually worn out spend the 150-400 bucks at that time.
Uh, no. If the chain has worn to over 0.5% elongation (over 1/16 inches in 12 inches original chain length, AKA 24 links) then the chain should be replaced. Otherwise it will serve to accelerate wear on both the cassette cogs and the chain rings. Replacing chain rings gets to be pretty expensive so letting a worn chain speed that up is not a good idea.
 

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Notice I didn’t recommend not replacing the chain if the new chain doesn’t skip. If the new chain does skip then there is already enough wear on the cassette that I would simply keep running it. If I replaced a chain and cassette every 2500 miles that would be another 1000/year in maintenance costs alone for those two items. Over the past 35 years of riding that really adds up. Most people are replacing bikes well before chainrings wear out and that is rarely ever a real issue, although shops like to tell you it is. Your guys money and you can do what you want with it but you really have to have significant visual wear on a chainring before it will skip.
 

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Actually, reread my first post, I guess it is a bit confusing how I wrote it. If a new chain doesn’t skip I would replace the chain, if it does skip then I would keep riding the old stuff, damage is already done.
 

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Actually, reread my first post, I guess it is a bit confusing how I wrote it. If a new chain doesn’t skip I would replace the chain, if it does skip then I would keep riding the old stuff, damage is already done.
So, you would recommend riding a chain that skips and replacing a chain that does NOT skip? WTF are you saying.
 

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Doesn’t sound like the current chain is skipping so even if there is wear the current combination is working just fine. If you replace the chain and all of a sudden it starts skipping then the damage to the cassette is already done. At this point I would just keep riding what I have.
 

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Doesn’t sound like the current chain is skipping so even if there is wear the current combination is working just fine. If you replace the chain and all of a sudden it starts skipping then the damage to the cassette is already done. At this point I would just keep riding what I have.
Except the chainrings could still be ok. So now you'll ruin them too.
 
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