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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'll admit the only time I've ridden Women's Specific bikes was about 8-10 years ago when they first came out. I thought they were heavy and it was like the companies that were making them weren't even aware that there were women who might want a nice, light, performance oriented bike.

Have any of you ridden any of the modern ones? What say you? Good bikes or heavy and cumbersome?
 

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GIMME MY BIKE!
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I have a long torso and long arms, so I've never even bothered trying one. I doubt they would fit me.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
HokieRider said:
i have a cannondale femme frame and it fits well. that said, I've never ridden a properly sized mens (or non women specific) road bike. my mtn bike wasn't women specific and it felt great, so who knows.
Did you get it recently? I'm curious cause I was at a LBS last month and it looks as if some companies are getting serious about making good women's specific bikes.
 

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Lets Go Hokies!!!
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i got it last year. i really like it. they actually don't make it anymore...its a R500 Femme and they only make the synapse and one called the optimo now. its a great bike. But if you're like Von and have a long torso, I can see how it wouldn't work. I'm pretty average sized in the torso and arms, so there ya go....
 

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il sogno said:
Did you get it recently? I'm curious cause I was at a LBS last month and it looks as if some companies are getting serious about making good women's specific bikes.
At interbike this year there seeemed to be several companies that were making really nice womens specific stuff and specking it out with good componets (never coudl under stand the WS bikes that get spec-ed with 44cm deep drop bars). Orbea Scott Bianchi and Specalized are the ones that really stood out in my mind. Specalized was sort of top of the heap with the lightest WS frame and really high end componets. Its slowly passing the idea that WS stuff should be second rate gear.
 

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Lemur-ing
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I know Trek makes some nice ones... That said, I don't know anyone who rides it other then this one girl in Lady Lurkers if I'm not wrong..
 

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Actually my wifes teammate rode a Trek WS frame and although the build quality seemed as nice as any of the trek bikes I thought the geometry was bad. Short wheel base so it was too twitchy and too steep in its angles. After we got her set up on a team frame (not WS) she commented on how much more stable it felt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
32and3cross said:
At interbike this year there seeemed to be several companies that were making really nice womens specific stuff and specking it out with good componets (never coudl under stand the WS bikes that get spec-ed with 44cm deep drop bars). Orbea Scott Bianchi and Specalized are the ones that really stood out in my mind. Specalized was sort of top of the heap with the lightest WS frame and really high end componets. Its slowly passing the idea that WS stuff should be second rate gear.
I was at my LBS last month and the guy there was telling me about Interbike and specifically about the WS Orbea. I was very impressed. Orbea is making the WS frame lighter than the men's Orca.

I'm hoping that the LBS will build one of these up when they get their shipment in so I'll be able to test ride it. If it's good, ulp! maybe I might put my current bike out to pasture and get one.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
32and3cross said:
Actually my wifes teammate rode a Trek WS frame and although the build quality seemed as nice as any of the trek bikes I thought the geometry was bad. Short wheel base so it was too twitchy and too steep in its angles. After we got her set up on a team frame (not WS) she commented on how much more stable it felt.
In year 2000 I test rode some Treks. The standard sizes went down to 50cm. I ride a 49cm standard so the bikes were a little too big for me. This was when I tried their WS bikes. Like you said, angles too steep and all of them outfitted with low end components.

I went out and bought my compact frame Colnago that year.
 

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I took a new Trek Madone 5.9 WSD out for a long demo ride last month. The Trek woman spent quite a bit of time setting the fit up for me. She watched me ride a little and then made a few more adjustments. It was a cold and rainy afternoon but I did not want to get off that bike. I ended up spending at least 45 minutes on it and really enjoyed the ride.

My regular bike is a Trek 2100 (regular - not WSD). I've had it for two seasons and put on around 2800 miles this year. I started experiencing some neck and shoulder aches by the end of summer. I felt so much more comfortable on the WSD, especially in the upper body. I test rode a regular Madone earlier in the summer (an 80 mile ride) and didn't find the difference between it and my regular bike to be as noticeable.

I am 5' 4" with a 30" inseam, so I may be more in the heighth range that they are targeting with their WSD's.
 

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I just purchased a Ruby S-works yesterday. I am 5'4" with a 28 inseam. My first bike was a Roubaix 52 cm that was too big but comfortable. I moved on to a Giant TCR1 which fit me height wise but the geometry was not comfortable. After a 2 hour fitting with a great LBS, I got the Ruby. It will be here in 2 weeks. They set me up on a Dolce which has the same Ruby geometry. No more back/neck pain. I can not wait!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
RubySue said:
I just purchased a Ruby S-works yesterday. I am 5'4" with a 28 inseam. My first bike was a Roubaix 52 cm that was too big but comfortable. I moved on to a Giant TCR1 which fit me height wise but the geometry was not comfortable. After a 2 hour fitting with a great LBS, I got the Ruby. It will be here in 2 weeks. They set me up on a Dolce which has the same Ruby geometry. No more back/neck pain. I can not wait!!!
Ruby be sure to post back in here and let us know how this bike works out! :thumbsup:
 

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Since I'm fairly tall, I never even tried a woman's frame. I had my Trek 1200 set up in such a way that the LBS guy laughed when I looked at the LeMonds.

"You've got that Trek set up like a LeMond." The minute I got on my Zurich, it was bike love at first ride. So, no WSD bikes for me.

In a semi-thread hijack move...
What about saddles? What saddles do you ride? I broke (dork move) the Terry Liberator that I have on my mtb. I replaced it with a Specialized Jett WSD which I think I loathe.

I like the San Marco Atola Gelaround (it's unisex) I have on my LeMond ok, but was thinking of going to a Brooks or getting another Terry. This may all belong in another thread...
 

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You're Not the Boss of Me
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Try the Terry Butterfly. A little more race with less padding than the Liberator, but if you ride even 50 miles a week during the "season" it will be a kindness. Less friction and saddle breakdown, lighter weight.
 

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Meow!
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I ride a WS 50-cm steel Bianchi Eros Donna and have been pretty happy with it. I have short legs and a longer torso/arms so finding a bike that fit was a challenge, even among WS bikes. The Bianchi's geometry--at least in the 50 cm--isn't too "radical." I don't think it's particularly twitchy or unstable. I would be curious, however, to know how the smaller sizes ride and whether they present any toe-overlap issues. Like bikes in general, my opinion is that some WS bikes will ride and handle better than others. There are too many variables to conclude that WS bikes are either all good or all bad.

The WS industry has come a long way, but it still has a ways to go. Several companies that offer WS bikes, including Bianchi (at least for 2006), are under the mistaken impression that women will be content with entry-level components and low-end frames. That truly irritates me. To get the bike I wanted, I had to swamp out some of the Campy Mirage components that were standard on my bike for Veloce. I plan to do a little more tweaking next season (the Mirage brakes are just not cutting it). Some people would argue that I shouldn't upgrade parts on what it arguably not a high-end frame. I see their point, but these are often the same people who have their choice of bikes that come stocked with Chorus/Ultegra/Record/DA. That said, companies like Terry, Trek and Specialized are offering a more comprehensive range of WS bikes, and I'm encouraged to see that Orbea is making carbon, well-speced bikes for women.

And as for saddles, I use a Terry Butterfly Tri-Gel with no complaints.

Kate
 

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WS lack components

indysteel said:
...The WS industry has come a long way, but it still has a ways to go. Several companies that offer WS bikes, including Bianchi (at least for 2006), are under the mistaken impression that women will be content with entry-level components and low-end frames... ...stocked with Chorus/Ultegra/Record/DA...
My wife struggled finding a high end bike with an appropriate component group. Usually stopped at midlevel frames and component groups. Then on top of that the components came out of the regular parts bin. Sure there was a saddle with flowers on it but the stock handlebar was 44cm wide. While buying a built up bike is great price wise, she had to buy a frame and the pick and choose the groupo and components she needed.
 
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