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OMG! I think i've found the ultimate ride route through the Dolomites
The trip is just the right length and takes in all the best bits - and not expensive either!!
Anyone else do this kind of thing?
Guided Cycle Tour Dolomites Alps
I think Swift Solo is the Dolomite Man on this forum.
Never done this trip, but 2455 - 3785 - 2750 m three days in a row sounds brutal to me (not counting jet lag etc.)
I've done 4500 m in one day once (3x Ventoux) and I didn't feel like repeating it the day after.
It can be done, no doubt about that, and you don't have to be superwoman, but personally I don't feel that being able to do 140 km "comfortably" and "being used to" distances upto 100 km over "hilly terrain" prepares you for this. Unless hilly is really, really hilly.
 

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4500 m in one day --- eh gads. I did a century with 8000 (~ 2650 m) feet of climbing once and sure didn't feel lie doing much the next day.
 

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4500 m in one day --- eh gads. I did a century with 8000 (~ 2650 m) feet of climbing once and sure didn't feel lie doing much the next day.
I took it easy - my average speed is a closely guarded secret - so it wasn't that bad. But I had a day of rest before and after. The OP is talking about 9000 m in 3 days. That third day is going to be tough (and the second, too). Not undoable, but tough.
 

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The second day takes in much of the maratona plus tre croci--much like stage 14 of the Giro. That includes passo's sella, gardena, campolongo, giau, plus tre croci and is only missing pordoi and falzarego. Passo giau alone is pretty brutal in this direction.

This tour is counting on bussing the few who make it to auronzo back to Feltre to pick up their luggage. Wiggins might make it--you know--if he decides to join the ride.

The notion that this route takes in "all of the best bits" falls short by 90%.

I'm thinking this may be advertising.
I took it easy - my average speed is a closely guarded secret - so it wasn't that bad. But I had a day of rest before and after. The OP is talking about 9000 m in 3 days. That third day is going to be tough (and the second, too). Not undoable, but tough.
 

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The second day takes in much of the maratona plus tre croci--much like stage 14 of the Giro. That includes passo's sella, gardena, campolongo, giau, plus tre croci and is only missing pordoi and falzarego. Passo giau alone is pretty brutal in this direction.

This tour is counting on bussing the few who make it to auronzo back to Feltre to pick up there luggage. Wiggins might make it--you know--if he decides to join the ride.

The notion that this route takes in "all of the best bits" falls short by 90%.

I'm thinking this may be advertising.
The website is strange, that's for sure.
"We should expect slight temperature drop and cool conditions on the mountains (800m+)"
800m+, really?
I've done Col de la Bonette between snow walls in july. And that's 70 km or so from Nice, not in the Dolomites.
I see Passo Giau is 9,1 % over 10 km, Tre Croci 7,1 % over 8 km and so on.
Advertising, indeed.
 

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Having ridden a fair bit in the alps and dolomites, a few things worth mentioning.

As has been said, those are big days and back to back.

In most tours like this, there are very limited sag seats, so if you're not up to it, it's cold and raining/snowing or you're sick, you could very well still have to complete the ride from hotel to hotel. No options except calling a cab.

Jet lag will kick your butt. It's one thing to get up the day after the flight and go sight seeing, it's another altogether to convince your body that it can perform well at what it considers 3am. I was a competitive athlete in another life and I always gave my body a week to adjust before European competitions. As a recreational rider, I still go over 3-4 days early so I can hang out and do a little local riding before going big. Not to mention if the airlines lose your bike for a couple of days which isn't unusual.

My preferred method is to pick a hotel base camp and ride out of it for a few days and then move on. That way, you can tailor your rides to the weather and what you feel like. Usually with a group of friends, we'll rent a van and do our own thing.

If you want to go that route, I can give you some good contacts.
 

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Your approach is pretty much the same as ours. No guide is needed and from one hotel room in Corvara you can do Passo's Campolongo, Pordoi, Sella, Gardena, Marmolada, Furcia, Erbe, Falzarego, Valparola, Giau, Staulanza, Duran, Tre Croci, and Alp di Siusi. When you consider that you can do many of these in either direction there is plenty of riding for a four week vacation.

Few of these rides exceed 80 miles and most of them combine into loops of 4000 to 8000'. Because this villiage is between two the more awesome downhills in the Dolomites, you can ride up for a thrilling descent before breakfast on your day off.
Having ridden a fair bit in the alps and dolomites, a few things worth mentioning.

As has been said, those are big days and back to back.

In most tours like this, there are very limited sag seats, so if you're not up to it, it's cold and raining/snowing or you're sick, you could very well still have to complete the ride from hotel to hotel. No options except calling a cab.

Jet lag will kick your butt. It's one thing to get up the day after the flight and go sight seeing, it's another altogether to convince your body that it can perform well at what it considers 3am. I was a competitive athlete in another life and I always gave my body a week to adjust before European competitions. As a recreational rider, I still go over 3-4 days early so I can hang out and do a little local riding before going big. Not to mention if the airlines lose your bike for a couple of days which isn't unusual.

My preferred method is to pick a hotel base camp and ride out of it for a few days and then move on. That way, you can tailor your rides to the weather and what you feel like. Usually with a group of friends, we'll rent a van and do our own thing.

If you want to go that route, I can give you some good contacts.
 

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I'm seriously considering the Dolomites as well, but this year I decided on repeating Girona and spending a week in the French Alps and competing in Voijany Oisans instead. I may very well wind up in the Dolomites next year although I am also thinking Swiss Alps and Nice.

That is serious elevation especially over three contiguous days. Maybe I'm getting old, I consider myself a decent climber but I have trouble killing it three days in a row. I'd be a basket case.

My plan for French Alps is Slow ride up Alpe De Huez, some easy rides and at least two days of rest before doing Vaujany Oisans. I don't have the exact plan in front of me but rest and recuperation is very much part of the plan before the big race.
 
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