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Hi just thought i'd mention to everyone on a low carb diet that if you ride frequently and alot you really dont need to be on one to lose weight.
Before i started riding i was on a low carb diet and lost alot of weight mabye a bit to much. Then i started riding i found after about 1 hour id feel CRAP on the bike. I started racing a found i ran out of energy alot.
I wanted to win races and feel good when i was riding so i started eating more. Bread with jam, pancakes or cereal and lot of it before a ride. Lollies, bananas, energy drink on rides over 2 hours. I'd have massive sandwhiches when i got home and coke glasses of milk, coffee or milo, big dinners and guess what i still lost weight. But most importantly i felt great on the bike i could ride for 5 or 6 hours with a bunch (I ride with sponsered cyclists that are 10-20 year older that me now), i got stronger and faster in a short period of time.
Any way i know this is a long post but i just wanted to say if you ride alot you dont need to be on a low carb diet to lose weight infact you dont even need to be on a diet. For example when i do a 4 hour ride i get about 2000+- calories on my HR monitor that s alot of food. Eat to ride the weight will come of naturally.
 

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The older you get the harder it is to keep the weight off. When I was in my 20s I could eat anything and sit around and still lose weight.
Now at 41 I can ride a lot and eat like a bird and still gain weight.
 

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My breakfast this morning. Seven 8" homemade blueberry pancakes with plenty of syrup, oatmeal, 4 peaces of toast, two bananas, and a salmon patty.

For dinner last night I had half pound of pasta with chicken breast.

No one can eat like this and stay slim, but a cyclist can.

If you don't take in enough carbs you'll wreck your nervous and immune system. Overtraining is a real problem for those that don't get the necessary carbs.

I have a book that states the caloric needs of a TDF rider as being somewhere in the neigborhood of 27 cheeseburgers every day.

After some of my hardest races I've eaten as much as 10,000 calories within a 24 hour period. Especially when it's the last race of the season.
 

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vexatious enigma
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I think that those low carb diets are complete crap. You need carbs in order to keep going. The average person needs about 2000 (correct me if I'm wrong) just to get through the day, add physical activity to that and you need much more. It's a horrible experience when you run out of energy on the bike.
 

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waldo425 said:
I think that those low carb diets are complete crap. You need carbs in order to keep going. The average person needs about 2000 (correct me if I'm wrong) just to get through the day, add physical activity to that and you need much more. It's a horrible experience when you run out of energy on the bike.

Not really sure about needing 2000 calories.
I ate less than a 1000 calories yesterday and I feel fine. A little hungry but I am trying to lose weight. I am taking time off any big rides during this time as I just don't have the energy to go more than an hour or so. After I lose somemore, I will eat to ride. Since counting calories for the first time this year I have noticed how many calories 2000 really is. That is a ton of food if you eat healthy.
Eat poorly, the calories can really add up.

I tried a low carb thing last summer. Never again. It was the worst experience of my life. I am not drawn to carbs like some people but I felt like crap and could not ride without bonking.
Never again will I ever try go without a food group.
 

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The paleo diet is essentially a low-carb diet. "The Paleo Diet for Athletes" recommends augmenting the usual diet with high-carb calories during and immediately following exercise.
 

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If I don't "Low Carb" my diet I put on weight...."FAST" This past fall...when my training went down to 9 hours a week and my balance went from protein to carbs (dang holiday season) I put on 11 pounds in 1.5 months and my caloric intake didn't really go up by much (only vaired by 100 or so extra calories a day).

But then I'm getting older...38 years old now...and have found that I don't suffer from a lack of energy by going lower carb. Now I don't over do it, but I try and keep my protein intake around 40% - 45% of my daily caloric intake. The rest is made up of fat and carbs.

I think the real key...take in enough calories to make sure you are getting enough to rebuild and recover from hard rides, regardless of where those calories come from.

Last season I was way overweight heading into the season and went fairly low carb...more than I am now...while training very hard and dropped 50 pounds in 4 months while still retaining energy and racing (and doing well).
 

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vexatious enigma
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pigpen said:
Not really sure about needing 2000 calories.
I ate less than a 1000 calories yesterday and I feel fine. A little hungry but I am trying to lose weight. I am taking time off any big rides during this time as I just don't have the energy to go more than an hour or so. After I lose somemore, I will eat to ride. Since counting calories for the first time this year I have noticed how many calories 2000 really is. That is a ton of food if you eat healthy.
Eat poorly, the calories can really add up.

I tried a low carb thing last summer. Never again. It was the worst experience of my life. I am not drawn to carbs like some people but I felt like crap and could not ride without bonking.
Never again will I ever try go without a food group.
This is a good point, 2000 is a lot. I don't remember where I read that tid-bit but it made sense up until now.

I have no idea how many calories I'm taking in daily. I feel like it may be pretty high considering that all I do is bike and go to the gym (to improve my biking.) I should probably count them up one of these days.
 

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The Dropped 1
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2,000cals is nothing!! I'm a light-weight female and that is the bare minimum I'll eat on days that I do, well, NOTHING.

I'm always jealous of the guys that ride similar to me (maybe a tad more) and eat whatever they want all day long. I'm really careful with my calories and watch calories eaten vs. calories burned. I've managed to drop a good amount of weight in the past 3-4 months with super consistent riding (higher volume than ever before doesn't hurt), but I still eat 55-60% of my daily calories in carbs.

I just started build recently and upped my calories from around 2400 to 2800-3000 a day. Weight is fluctuating up a bit higher, but I think it's partly muscle growth and I don't want to wind up bonking halfway through an interval workout.

I don't eat junk food or fast food, either! No alcohol (or very rarely).

I'm barely squeaking through this regen week on less calories. I can't restrict to less than 2300 most days! Maybe I just love to eat? :)
 

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Don't shoot the messenger, but on page 98 of Chris Carmichael's "Food for Fitness" (copyright date - 2004) - "Low-Carb Diets Are Not Suitable for Athletes"

"One of the goals of low-carbohydrate diets is to chronically deprive the body of carbohydrates. However, we know that when you do not consume enough carbohydrate, you deplete your energy stores and cannot work out effectively."
 

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a friend of my mine just published a study (which I haven't read, but I've seen the abstract) finding no loss of fitness for trained cyclists on a calorie-restricted diet. I am not sure what everyone ingested, but it was typically way less than 2000 calories/day over a couple of months, anyway.
she used a lot of guys in my club for the study. several of them had the best season that they ever had.
I would have gnawed off the window sills.
 

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bill said:
a friend of my mine just published a study (which I haven't read, but I've seen the abstract) finding no loss of fitness for trained cyclists on a calorie-restricted diet. I am not sure what everyone ingested, but it was typically way less than 2000 calories/day over a couple of months, anyway.
she used a lot of guys in my club for the study. several of them had the best season that they ever had.
I would have gnawed off the window sills.
That sounds scary! Competitive athletes eating only 2000 cals a day?? Yowza! From what all I have read lately, you calculate your Resting Metabolic Rate (RMR), add whatever you burn from exercise for the day, then subtract what you eat. If the number is positive, you lose weight, if it's negative, you gain weight. I supposed I could understand this study if the subjects were overweight, but if they're super lean, and I'm guessing they'd be running quite a calorie deficit, I couldn't imagine it would be good for the body.
So they were on calorie restricted diets - were the carb/fat/protein ratios considered as well or was that not a factor. I'd be interested in reading it should you obtain a link to it :)

-Chris
 

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the diet was balanced. these were competitive cyclists -- not fat people, but they were sort of interested in dropping a few. and they did. one guy, who had been a killer Cat 3 sprinter, became a killer Cat 2 all-rounder.
I'll try to come up with the abstract.
 

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bill said:
Just read the abstract - very interesting! I'd be interested in a long term study (3-6 months). I wonder if a good deal of the measured benefit is because of a change in different factors (working out more and eating less), or if a fairly consistent improvement would be seen if the study had been conducted for a longer amount of time. The body always seems to adjust to whatever you throw at it :)
 

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bill said:
the diet was balanced. these were competitive cyclists -- not fat people, but they were sort of interested in dropping a few. and they did. one guy, who had been a killer Cat 3 sprinter, became a killer Cat 2 all-rounder.
I'll try to come up with the abstract.
Well, that's essentially what Lance did.

[Losing weight without losing power. Probably lost a hair of top-end speed, I'd guess.]

Throughout history, the vast majority of humans have existed on caloric restriction.
 

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3 weeks.....not near long enough. Interesting however.
I buy the submaximal efforts utilizing more fat for fuel, but hard intervals burn carbs primarily and you had better eat them or suffer the consequences.


Throughout history, the vast majority of humans have existed on caloric restriction.

Not while racing bike they have not.
 

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kef3844 said:
Not while racing bike they have not.
I disagree. Most successful cyclists have restricted their caloric intake. That's the whole point. Pro cyclists ride many hours a day and yet do not eat ad lib.
 
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