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has shifting performance suffered? do you drop a chain? excessive cassette noise? cassette looks fine probably will last for the next 2 seasons if light mileage, less than 1200 miles per. the chain ring looks like it's above 2000 miles but is probably allright, the faces haven't gotten real sharp, the rounded edges haven't been pointed and the bottom of the chainring groove is still round hasn't been flat bottomed. i don't replace until the teeth start to chip. If you do replace change the chainrings chain and cassette all at the same time.
 

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You didn't mention how many miles you have on the chain and how often you replace it. You also didn't tell us your riding style and chain lube frequency. All that said, I have a Dura Ace setup that has 16,000 miles on the chainrings and cassette. I clean & lube the chain at least every 200 miles and replace the chain every 1,500-2.000 miles. The chainrings and middle cassette gears are worn but will probably be good for another 4,000 miles.
 

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chainrings look fine..

Chainrings are one of the few items thatyou can actually look at and tell if they are worn. Yours look fine; some posters here report chainring life in the 20-50,000 mile range. Personally, I change, trade and upgrade too often to ever get that many miles on a chainring.

Cogs are another story. There is one simple test for a worn cog. Install a new chain and ride the bike. The chain will skip under any reasonably heavy load when it's used with a worn cog. Chain skip is quite distinct, you can't miss it.

Here's another bit of recently acquired wisdom. When one person finds a worn cog at say 6000 miles and another rider gets 12,000, it really means NOTHING. There is no way to no which worn cog actually has had more use in terms of actually revolutions before failure. Depending on your terrain, you might use only 2 cogs quite heavily. Another rider might spread the wear over 4 cogs and thus get twice the "life" from a cassette. The exact timing of a change to a new chain can also have a significant effect on PERCEIVED cassette life. Make that change to a new chain at the right time and you'll get the entire life of the last chain out of the cassette, maybe an extra 2-3000 miles. Make the change a couple of hundred miles later, by poor luck, and one cog may skip. That same cog could work perfectly with a chain that is just slightly worn. I found this to be the case with one of my cassettes. To check for cog wear, I installed and almost-new chain and everything worked fine. A few weeks later, I put on a brand new chain and 19T cog skips.

Changing chains frequently, like every 1,500-2000 miles is OK, but only if the chain has really worn enough to increase the pitch by .5% from 12 inches to 12-1/16 inches over 24 pins. Changing chains more frequently, perhaps as suggested by a Park chain tool, is just a waste of money. While using an out of pitch chain can decrease cog life, changing far ahead of need will not keep the cogs from wearing.

Another thing that I can tell you from experience, is that Ti cogs may have a life that is as 1/3 less than a steel cog, perhaps even less.
 
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