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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 1995 Cannondale Criterium 3.0 frame that I built up from a 1989 Criterium. The bike rides great, but I'm concerned that the rims are at the end of their usable life. I was looking at replacing the wheels and using the wheels on the bike now for another project. The problem I have is that the rear dropout spacing is 126mm and current hub spacing is 130mm. My question is, could I just throw a 130mm spaced hub in the frame (made of that famous super stiff Cannondale aluminum) and ride away without any worries, or should I just lace up new rims to the hubs (RX100) I have? Thanks!

Kris
 

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Arrogant roadie.....
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4,232 Posts
Aluminum tends to be very unforgiving when stressed past it's expected level, and it is not possible to safely cold-set aluminum dropouts without compromising the metal's structure.

A few years ago, Sheldon posted an article on how you could fit 8 cogs of a (then current standard) 9-speed cassette on a 126mm hub. You might be able to do 9 cogs from a 10-speed cassette the same way today.
 

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Banned forever.....or not
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I've got an old 1985 Cannondale in my basement that used to be my main ride. I rode it for years with an 130mm hub jammed in the rear drop-outs. The only trouble I had was getting the wheel in or out. The rear triangle is so stiff, I almost needed three hands to get the wheel in, and had to pound on the wheel with my hand to get it out.
You have to be a pretty manly man to get that wheel in there.
 

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n00bsauce
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We're talking a 4mm total difference, 2mm on each side. For some frames it's almost within manufacturing tolerances. I have a 1985 Cannondale R400 frame that I've converted to a flat bar 1x8 for commuting and use 130mm wheels. Actually the rear wheel slides in pretty easily. I've had some 130mm spaced frames where the wheels fit tighter in the dropouts. You do not have to cold set the frame and a 130mm hub should fit, albeit tight. I wouldn't worry about it at all.
 

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sloping is for girls
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There really isn't too much concern cast by the holy pages upon this matter.

"Ideally, the frame spacing should exactly match the hub spacing. This makes for easiest wheel replacement. In practice, however, there's a fair amount of latitude in fit. In fact, when the first 130 mm 8-speed hubs were introduced, they had locknuts with beveled sides, so that you could "spring" apart the rear triangle of a frame made for the then-standard 126 mm spacing.

In general, you can safely go up one size in spacing this way, just springing the frame apart. I can't give you an absolute guarantee that this won't cause damage, but the odds are very much in your favor"
 

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Banned forever.....or not
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#1: You can't "cold set" a C'Dale frame.
#2: I remember a C'Dale ad where a guy had all his weight on the drop outs of a C'Dale frame, (on it's side, on the floor) and they didn't close up 1mm.
 

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n00bsauce
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Well, I'm a 90# weakling and I will guarantee you I can flex the stays of my Cannondale more than 1mm with my own two arms. Ads are, well, ads.
 
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