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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am planning on updating the drive train on my 8 year old custom Lynskey. I weigh 250 but working on getting to 225lb. I'm built like a linebacker or heavy weight fighter so I'm slow. I ride mostly mountain but plan on doing more road miles. I ride carbon tubeless on my mountain bikes and love the stiffness and cush. Although I like stiff road wheels I discovered even at my weight a harsh riding wheel is not fun. I'm seriously thinking of going away from road tubeless because if I not riding it often, it is staring to become a PITA to maintain. I was planning on getting the DTs but my LBS offered fantastic deal on the Rovals. I must mention I try to avoid road riding when it's wet and long descents will be few in number. Any thoughts? Thanks.
 

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Forever a Student
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Well Roval/Specialized just lost a lawsuit where in they stole designs from Stan's No Tubes.

So I would say no to Roval/Specialized based purely on principle. Feel like buying stolen designs from a corporate giant? Not me.
 

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Max recommended system weight for the RR21 Dicut is 110 kg.
 

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Neither wheelset is appropriate for your weight and intended use if you are looking for reasonably durable wheels that will not need constant attention.

Find something with at least 28 conventional spokes with a deeper carbon (assuming you have a compelling reason to go with carbon) or preferably 32 spokes with a shallower mid-depth aluminum. The extra spokes will not slow you down appreciably and I think would be a welcomed insurance. You could go with fewer spokes on the front but at your weight and frontal mass, you have a lot more to overcome before thinking about spoke weight and resistance.

A custom maybe your best bet, if not, look also at the Fulcrum line.

P.S. Your LBS is not serving you right. It appears he is trying to unload a take-off from an older Specialized sale. He should have cautioned you against its use for a person of your size.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks all. Yeah, I'm not a fan of Specialized's aggressive legal actions. I couldn't find the weight limit except in in a reveiw, so thanks again. I'll have to clarify with my LBS. As far as spoke count, on my mountain bikes I always run a high spoke count wheel and was planning to do so on my road bike until I tried my current Eurus. I was hoping advancements would make the Dicuts as bomb proof as my Eurus. At my weight I'm worried about braking with the carbon wheel set. I think I'll give Speed Dream a call.
 

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Thanks all. Yeah, I'm not a fan of Specialized's aggressive legal actions. I couldn't find the weight limit except in in a reveiw, so thanks again. I'll have to clarify with my LBS. As far as spoke count, on my mountain bikes I always run a high spoke count wheel and was planning to do so on my road bike until I tried my current Eurus. I was hoping advancements would make the Dicuts as bomb proof as my Eurus. At my weight I'm worried about braking with the carbon wheel set. I think I'll give Speed Dream a call.
Eurus and Zonda have proved themselves. Fulcrum Racing is the closest equivalent for Shimano drivetrains (thus my earlier recommendation). I have used the Racing 1 for a number of years and it has remained as true as the day I bought it.

However, if you brake a spoke you are walking home because the remaining spokes can not keep the wheel from wobbling.
 

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Check out November Wheels. I emailed them this past Fall, regarding options for more spokes that what was listed on their website, and was told that they did have some carbon rims with 28 spoke counts.

Also, regarding the ROVAL wheels weight limit.....if the Specialized dealer sold wheels to someone over the weight limit, what would happen in terms of warranty issues? Anyone have experience with that? Seems like Specialized would be forced to honor their warranty.
 

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Check out November Wheels. I emailed them this past Fall, regarding options for more spokes that what was listed on their website, and was told that they did have some carbon rims with 28 spoke counts.
Sorry if there was a misunderstanding there. We have a very few 28h Rail 52 rims that the rim manufacturer drilled with 28 instead of the 20 and 24 that we get. We don't offer those for general sale, and with the new tubeless 52 we will only be getting 20/24 drilling. I would not recommend carbon rims for the OP's intended use.

Here's (maybe not so) brief explanation of why we don't do higher spoke counts in carbon wheels. This is one of the MANY things we encounter every day that merits far far more explanation than the world allows time for. Despite the hugely higher heat tolerance of our and many other carbon rims over what was around a couple of years ago, carbon rims still present heat challenges. In order to warp one of our current carbon rims, you basically have to go down a huge hill dragging your rear brake. We've developed a good, repeatable real world test which covers up to 200 pound rider use. The 200 pound rider in this test is me, wearing 40 pounds of extra weights.

Our most recent heat incident with a Rail happened at Levi's Gran Fondo in October 2015. That ride specifically recommends against using carbon clinchers. In the case involving our wheels, there had been a rider fatality (about which I don't know any particulars) on one of the most severe downhills of a ride that contains many many severe downhills. This particular section is a couple of miles averaging around 8% with stretches of 15%+ grades. Due to the need to manage the ride around the rider fatality, marshals required a huge number of people to descend this hill at speeds requiring constant braking. A rider on November Rails had his rear wheel suffer a minor warp during this (he actually rode the wheel for more than a month after the incident). I don't think many other wheel companies would share this story, but we know quite well the temperature at which a Rail rim fails, and how more or less impossible it would be for a normal rider to generate those temperatures in other than a very extreme case like this one. In three years of Rail sales, I still only need one hand to count the number that are known to have suffered heat damage, and all were well outside of ordinary cases.

As far as we know, there is no good way of objectively testing how many spokes a certain rider needs. You do this by iteratively testing as much stuff as you can, in as many use cases as you can, with as many riders as you can, and then you apply that to situations where you don't have directly applicable tests. For example, we haven't tested HED alloy rims in as many use situations as we've tested Pacenti rims, but from bench testing and other stuff, we know that the rims are similar enough that we'll feel our best recommendation with a Pacenti build will be 100% applicable to a HED alloy build.

We have tested Rail builds in every way we possibly can, and have reams of input on it. Just yesterday, we got an email from one of the very first Rail 52 owners (he ordered the very first day they were available), and he is a 215 pound former match sprinter who has 12000 miles on his 20/24 52s over just shy of three years, he loves them and they have been awesome wheels for him. We have had national caliber sprinters (as in, have won NRC crits) who are in the high 190s and who put out unthinkable watts use Rails extensively and tell us that the 20/24 build performs great in that use case.

Our heat testing with 200 pounds of rider is what I would consider extreme testing for the bigger end of our carbon wheel rider audience. The OP is 25% heavier than the weight at which we test in extreme conditions. How exactly that extra weight turns the dynamics of a fairly ordinary situation for a 190 or 200 pound rider into one more closely resembling an extreme situation, we can't exactly say. There are far too many variables and dynamics at play. A few weeks ago, I descended Palomar Mountain on a set of Rails without a moment's thought to the safety of doing such. It was a beautiful day and although the road surface is pretty horrible, as a fairly adept bike handler I was able to descend what I would call "normally." The OP weighs 55% more than I do, though. His bike will accelerate mine faster than mine, and take much more energy to slow or stop than mine - doubly so because he will be stopping more weight from a higher speed. The point of which is to say that my comfortable cruise down one of the crazier descents in the US might be a heck of a lot less demanding on my wheels than his day to day ride.

But for a 200 or 215 pound guy who wants to use a good set of deep-ish carbons for racing or run of the mill group rides, and who has a set of alloy wheels for his trips to Palomar, 20/24 carbons can work wonderfully. For the guy who is about the OP's size who wants to use them for every day use and is looking for a 24/28 build to cover that, we don't think that's an appropriate use case for carbon clinchers, so we don't offer the build to cover it.

Hopefully that makes some sense, even though it turned out to be not even close to brief.

*edited for clarity 2/18*
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm not a hammer and I don't want to be too much of a Fred so carbon is out. Plus, the concerns expressed above reinforced my decision to go with alloy. My Eurus are the brass nipple version and I would guess actual weight to be 1600gm. The 28/32 Boyd Altamont Lites with Eternity hubs I ordered may be a few grams more. Also, I wouldn't feel bad using these on mild gravel roads with 28 tires especially after I drop some weight.
 
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