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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all!

Now that I built my 1st wheelset, I am thinking about my 2nd one. Could this wheelbuilding thing be addictive? :)

Anyway, for my 2nd build, I am considering DT Swiss RR40 rims. The other components will be similar to my 1st build which were with HED C2 rims:

14/15/14 spokes - DT or possibly Wheelsmith which are reported to have a better finish

Brass nipples

Shimano 6800 Ultegra hubs

32 spoke 3x pattern

I am around 180lbs., but on longer rides, I don't exactly travel light, so rider and bike can easily be around 205lbs.

My question is, do you recommend the asymmetrical rear? The advantages of more equal DS and NDS tensions are obvious. Are there any disadvantages?

Fair Wheel Bikes mentioned that they have seen more early failures in asymmetrical rims in the past. Is there any reason to believe this to be an issue in my decision?

Thanks in advance!
 

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My question is the same as yours so it will be interesting to see the replies. I'm looking to build a new PowerTap wheel on Wheelbuilder.com and wonder if the DT Swiss 440 asymmetrical, another DT Swiss rim or HED Belgium C2 rim would be best for both training and centuries or longer, e.g. Triple Bypass.
 

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@lombard
If a rim can take 130kgf there is no reason to go asymmetric with the 6800; especially when the choice is a narrower and shorter rim.
Look on the R460 as another option if you want to stay with DT

@roadie
IMO, HED C2
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
@lombard
If a rim can take 130kgf there is no reason to go asymmetric with the 6800; especially when the choice is a narrower and shorter rim.
Look on the R460 as another option if you want to stay with DT

@roadie
IMO, HED C2
Thanks DC! Well, I guess I could do another HED C2, but really wanted to try a different rim for variety, if nothing else.

DTs wheels state a max tension of 1200NM which equals 122kgf. I did look at the R460, but my reservation about that one is it's tubeless compatible which usually means a royal PITA mounting/unmounting clincher tires. Also, I think 18mm wide pushes the limit on my chain stays.
 

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130 kgf on the stand will give you about 122-125 kgf with the tire on and inflated.

Tubeless rims its where it will be. You are trying to avoid the unavoidable but I do understand and share the concern. Proper technique helps loads on them though.

Archetypes are still non-tubeless and are top notch rims at around the same weight and performance as the HED.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
130 kgf on the stand will give you about 122-125 kgf with the tire on and inflated.

Tubeless rims its where it will be. You are trying to avoid the unavoidable but I do understand and share the concern. Proper technique helps loads on them though.

Archetypes are still non-tubeless and are top notch rims at around the same weight and performance as the HED.

Ahhh, so I didn't realize the tension spec they give is for a fully inflated tire! I did notice the tensions decreased about 2 graduations on the tensiometer after I mounted and inflated tires.

The Archetypes do seem like good quality rims and aesthetically pleasing until you start to wear down that anodized brake track. Do they at some point wear to where it would look virtually like a machined track? It sounds like you like the Archetypes better than the DT RR440s.

I even found the HEDs a bit of a challenge to mount without levers. I needed levers for the last few inches. I since read about squeezing the bead into the center of the rim as hard as possible during mounting since the channel would give the tire a shorter distance for lack of a better way of putting it.
 

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Ahhh, so I didn't realize the tension spec they give is for a fully inflated tire! I did notice the tensions decreased about 2 graduations on the tensiometer after I mounted and inflated tires.

The Archetypes do seem like good quality rims and aesthetically pleasing until you start to wear down that anodized brake track. Do they at some point wear to where it would look virtually like a machined track? It sounds like you like the Archetypes better than the DT RR440s.

I even found the HEDs a bit of a challenge to mount without levers. I needed levers for the last few inches. I since read about squeezing the bead into the center of the rim as hard as possible during mounting since the channel would give the tire a shorter distance for lack of a better way of putting it.
Yes, they do.

If you want to reach there quicker, ride a few times in the rain.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Yes, they do.

If you want to reach there quicker, ride a few times in the rain.

LOL! Um, no thanks. Don't mind heat or cold, but wet weather is a show stopper for me. I think I can wait. :) If I really get that impatient, I'm guessing sandpaper or a Scotchbrite pad should get me there sooner. :)
 

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LOL! Um, no thanks. Don't mind heat or cold, but wet weather is a show stopper for me. I think I can wait. :) If I really get that impatient, I'm guessing sandpaper or a Scotchbrite pad should get me there sooner. :)
Riding in the rain is not that bad if you have the proper gear. In some strange way I kinda enjoy it if it's light rain. I try to commute with the bike as much as possible and as they ..... The first few times is difficult after that you get used to it....... you got to have fenders though, real fenders not the plastic excuses for fenders, I would never do it without them.
One pair of Archetype I have is the now discontinued Hard Anodized; the brake track is almost as good as if it was machined and this was the hardest to wear off evenly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Riding in the rain is not that bad if you have the proper gear. In some strange way I kinda enjoy it if it's light rain. I try to commute with the bike as much as possible and as they .....
Hmmm. Well I guess if you commute on your bike, you have no choice. I've been on rides where the forecast of dry and cloudy turned into a day of rain. Always felt really beat up afterwards - 30 miles felt like 100! Reduced visibility is a big issue here. Not to mention it can't be great for the bike. If I had to ride in the rain, I would save a beater bike for those days. Bearings and water don't get along well.
 

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Hmmm. Well I guess if you commute on your bike, you have no choice. I've been on rides where the forecast of dry and cloudy turned into a day of rain. Always felt really beat up afterwards - 30 miles felt like 100! Reduced visibility is a big issue here. Not to mention it can't be great for the bike. If I had to ride in the rain, I would save a beater bike for those days. Bearings and water don't get along well.
We are derailing this thread somewhat but since you are the OP it may be excusable, I guess!

See, I don't have to commute by bike, I want to commute by bike and keep a car at the office. I'm very fortunate that my commute is mostly on a paved bike path alongside the river; quite a way to start one's day! I have not found visibility to be an issue with just rain. As a matter of fact, this morning I had light rain throughout the morning. Quite pleasant coming down the trail.

My view on my commuter is that it needs to be one of my better bikes because I start my day with it and finish it as well. As a matter of fact, I don't have anything I could classify as a "beater" bike. Some see more love than others because of mood changes but that's about it. Life is too short to waste it on beater bikes unless you want to! Bearings are consumables as is grease. No big deal. If anything it makes you to keep up with your bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
We are derailing this thread somewhat but since you are the OP it may be excusable, I guess!

See, I don't have to commute by bike, I want to commute by bike and keep a car at the office. I'm very fortunate that my commute is mostly on a paved bike path alongside the river; quite a way to start one's day! I have not found visibility to be an issue with just rain. As a matter of fact, this morning I had light rain throughout the morning. Quite pleasant coming down the trail.

My view on my commuter is that it needs to be one of my better bikes because I start my day with it and finish it as well. As a matter of fact, I don't have anything I could classify as a "beater" bike. Some see more love than others because of mood changes but that's about it. Life is too short to waste it on beater bikes unless you want to! Bearings are consumables as is grease. No big deal. If anything it makes you to keep up with your bike.
Hmmm. Well if I had a bike path by a river to commute on away from car traffic, I might not mind rain as much - as long as it's not a torrential t-storm. I'd be regularly commuting on my bike for sure! You lucky guy! :)

But anyway, back to original topic. Do you think the Archetypes are much better than the RR440s? Do the RR440s have any downsides I should know about?

Thanks!
 

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Hmmm. Well if I had a bike path by a river to commute on away from car traffic, I might not mind rain as much - as long as it's not a torrential t-storm. I'd be regularly commuting on my bike for sure! You lucky guy! :)

But anyway, back to original topic. Do you think the Archetypes are much better than the RR440s? Do the RR440s have any downsides I should know about?

Thanks!
Neither much better nor much worst! I think the RR440 are better optimized for climbing/racing than the Archetype. If I was not doing any of these at a level where such differences would matter, I would not see the reason why I should give up a wider and stiffer rim like the Archetype to save a few grams. Tubeless aside.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Neither much better nor much worst! I think the RR440 are better optimized for climbing/racing than the Archetype. If I was not doing any of these at a level where such differences would matter, I would not see the reason why I should give up a wider and stiffer rim like the Archetype to save a few grams. Tubeless aside.
Thanks DC!

Hmmm. I didn't realize until now the Archetypes were heavier - a whole 19 grams per rim more than the RR440 and 14 grams more than the HED C2s -whoopie! I'm concentrating on losing the weight I put on my engine during the past year. I can feel it. I hope to lose more than 38 grams. :mad2:

I didn't think the RR440 was a tubeless compatible rim, but one comment I read was that it has the tubeless profile, hence difficulty mounting tires.

One last (I think) question. Do the Archetypes have brake wear indicators?
 

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They do but not as pronounced as the HED.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
In case you had not seen it, or forgot about it.
Another older overview that includes the 3 rims mentioned, including the RR440
Alloy Rim Roundup - Fairwheel Bikes Blog

Thanks Z'mer. I'm actually very familiar with this very good write-up from Fair Wheel as it's been passed around here a few times. I had never seen the one from DCR which is why I posted it.
 
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