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Which one do you guys believe is better and why? Deciding on which groupset to put on my new Tarmac. This bike would get ridden 75-100 miles a week. Don't want to have to do a lot of tinkering or adjusting once it's installed.
 

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Ride them both (or the most previous version) and figure out which ergonomics you like best. The most noticeable difference is the way that Dura-Ace & SRAM Red shift (e.g., double tap for SRAM).

Both will be very reliable, so long as you keep them clean and the chain lubed, for the 75 - 100 mile / week you are talking about.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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Which one do you guys believe is better and why? Deciding on which groupset to put on my new Tarmac. This bike would get ridden 75-100 miles a week. Don't want to have to do a lot of tinkering or adjusting once it's installed.
Troll. Ban him.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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There are no moderators. They vanished long ago, or at least they never bother to do anything like moving or locking threads.

How can anyone here tell you which drivetrain you'll like better? Obviously they both work great. It's totally up to you...go try 'em and see what you think.
 

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Bianchi-Campagnolo
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This is the rule:

Campagnolo wears in. Shimano wears out. SRAM breaks.

Make your choice. :D
 
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If the bike is not an EPS frame go SRAM, otherwise go Shimano. The beauty of the SRAM design is it will work on any bike even if not designed to support electronic shifting. Shimano will be the more reliable long term solution. Also keep in mind that right now the only R9100 being released is mechanical only.
 

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Agreed with : you really have to try both yourself to really know which one works best for you...weight, ergonomics, style of shifting, cost etc.

When I was a total weight weenie, it was SRAM red or bust. Although I still consider weight when building up a bike, I now put more emphasis on how well the system shifts and how reliable it is. Hence, have switched to DA 9000 on both of my bikes. Buttery smooth shifting and very dependable. My vote goes to DA9100.

Tried DI2 before...although nice, can't justify its cost at this point as mechanical DA is just so smooth once dialed in!

Never tried Campy...


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Banned Sock Puppet
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It all depends what is important to you.

If reliability and durability for the long haul are important to you, get Shimano.

If bling and gimmicks are important to you, get SRAMmed.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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It all depends what is important to you.

If reliability and durability for the long haul are important to you, get Shimano.

If bling and gimmicks are important to you, get SRAMmed.
Your posts have been really good lately, then this.
 

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coaster
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Dura-ace 9000. Looks better than either of the other options. MUCH cheaper. Works as well unless you need a cassette bigger than 28t. Same weight as 9100, a little heavier than Red 22 but a crank swap cancels most of that.
 

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Dura-ace 9000. Looks better than either of the other options. MUCH cheaper. Works as well unless you need a cassette bigger than 28t. Same weight as 9100, a little heavier than Red 22 but a crank swap cancels most of that.

if you need larger than a 28 get a long cage rear derailleur from ultegra. r9100 supports 30 because its long cage. the ultegra r.d. shifts about as well as dura ace.
 

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coaster
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if you need larger than a 28 get a long cage rear derailleur from ultegra. r9100 supports 30 because its long cage. the ultegra r.d. shifts about as well as dura ace.
Close.
9100 supports a larger cog than 9000 because of the position of the upper pulley. The longer cage is capable of taking up more chain slack. Yes, a 6800 rear derailleur added to an otherwise 9000 groupset will allow use of up to a 32t cog officially and depending on the frame up to a 36t cog.

The important point being that we agree the current stuff works awesome and it's available now at a great price.
 

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Close.
9100 supports a larger cog than 9000 because of the position of the upper pulley. The longer cage is capable of taking up more chain slack. Yes, a 6800 rear derailleur added to an otherwise 9000 groupset will allow use of up to a 32t cog officially and depending on the frame up to a 36t cog.

The important point being that we agree the current stuff works awesome and it's available now at a great price.
sole issue with 9000 which i understand should still exist for 9100 is the rear derailleur cable is prone to fraying near the front brifter. My take from reading the reviews is that the mechanical version of 9100 offers little benefit if any over 9000. Where 9100 has some interesting stuff is for riders opting for disc and eps.
 

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sole issue with 9000 which i understand should still exist for 9100 is the rear derailleur cable is prone to fraying near the front brifter. My take from reading the reviews is that the mechanical version of 9100 offers little benefit if any over 9000. Where 9100 has some interesting stuff is for riders opting for disc and eps.
Yes. Good points. One of the notable difference is the new 9100 cranks...not necessarily better, just different. I own two bikes with DA 9000. Will not switch to 9100. I may switch to the 9150 when it arrives on one of my bikes though...maybe?


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