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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Rider Stats/Preferences: Weight - 157 lb Height 6 foot 0 inches.

I ride 2-3 challenge centuries a year. Most of them are mountain centuries with 8k+ of climbing. I do not race. My aero needs are slim to none. For me, 'aero' consists of drafting off the fast guys until the real climbing starts. I'm not worried about comfort as much as I am durability.

I would like to build a reasonably light, yet durable set of wheels around some Chris King r45 hubs.

For durability sake, I would likely use 24/28 hubs.

Because I'm not really needing significant aero, I was thinking Sapim lasers would be fine.

I'm inclined to use brass nipples for the durability but am not sure that it's warranted.

As to rims, the DT Swiss 440 seems to fit the bill for relatively light weight, durability, and drilling compatibility. The Pacenti is another intriguing option. The Kinlin XR-19W is lighter, but, I wonder about its durability compared to the DT or Pacenti.

I would likely build them 2x front and rear.

Any suggestions before I shell out the $$$?

Thanks!
 

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There is no reason why light rims and tires will help you more on a climb than losing weight elsewhere. They will make the bike's *handling* lighter however, which you may or may not want.

Even on a climb a little bit better aero performance will make more difference than a little weight. 100g is ~0.1% speed difference on a climb. If you are climbing at 10 mph, that's 0.01 mph. And the aero performance will help on the flat. I'd put CX-Rays on it... they are as strong and light as anything and easy to build with high tension.

The spoke count you want/need will depend on the rim... not good to choose that ahead of time, unless 24/28 is your minimum.

If you want a light rim and a wide rim... there aren't any. The Pacenti would be the best bet... with the added bonus that it is probably the most aero, too.

Aluminum nipples are fine if a good compound is used on the threads.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for your reply.

I chose 24/28 for a couple of reasons. First, I'm not all that experienced of a wheel builder. I've put together 4-5 sets of wheels over the span of the last few years. I figure the 24/28 stands a better chance with my limited skills than a 20/24 build would. Second, at 157 I'm kind of on the border for lower spoke counts. If I were to *gasp* gain weight it might be a little hard to ride 20/24.

The aero perspective is helpful. While these centuries are 'climbing' centuries, there are flats and descents in them. I'm currently on Bonti Race X Lites waiting for the rim to crack at the eyelet. It will happen eventually. This will likely turn in to my every day riding wheel when the Bonti's go bye-bye. In the meantime, I'll ride them some, but use them mainly for events.
 

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A good climbers wheelset should also have great downhill abilities which is often overlooked in all these light wheels discussions. To me this is more important than weight savings.
Steep ascents often tend to end up in steep descents where insufficient braking and steering qualities reduce confidence and cost time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Granted. Thinking about hitting switchbacks on the descent at speed with light-weight rims makes me cringe. I'd like to think that I watch out and think ahead, but, I know better. Many has been the time where I grabbed both brakes hard and still almost missed my line.
 

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Even your first set of wheels can be very good, if you take your time and are meticulous, and do a good job of stress relieving. Stress relieving is the trickiest part to get right. Mike T has a pretty thorough page on wheelbuilding. Wheels

I weigh 170 and rode a set with 18f 24r Stans 340 rims... back when they were actually < 350g. No problems in 10k miles. I'm now on the Kinlin XC279s in 20f and 24r. I would have preferred 16f and 20r, but no 16h rims are available. Also check what manufacturers sell. If they even have weight limits it's usually well above what you will ever reach... unless you are planning to gain 50 lbs or something. I guess what I'm trying to say is that if you choose the Pacenti rim (which should be rather stiff), 20f and 24r will not be fragile. If you aren't someone who really thrashes wheels they should be more than adequate.

And CX-Rays are easier to build with, since twist can be easily prevented. If you buy the spokes from Alchemy, they have a good holder and nipple installer that you can pick up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yes, I just finished building up a set of wheels for my son and followed Mike's stress relief guidelines. I took them on a 57 mile ride to test them and they did just fine. Dura Ace 7800 32/32 laced to DT 415s. 2x front, 3x rear. Even my son will have a hard time trashing this set....That Dura Ace hub is soooo quiet......

Sooo, 20/24 hubs would be OK with a heavier rim like Pacenti? I was also considering the Stans. I guess the low weight of the rim scares me a little.
 

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Yes, I just finished building up a set of wheels for my son and followed Mike's stress relief guidelines. I took them on a 57 mile ride to test them and they did just fine. Dura Ace 7800 32/32 laced to DT 415s. 2x front, 3x rear. Even my son will have a hard time trashing this set....That Dura Ace hub is soooo quiet......

Sooo, 20/24 hubs would be OK with a heavier rim like Pacenti? I was also considering the Stans. I guess the low weight of the rim scares me a little.
I think the Pacenti would be fine in 20/24, all though I haven't built that hoop in that particular hole count yet. I wouldn't build the Stans in that range though. I really think that is a hoop that needs to be overbuilt.
 

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I weigh 150lbs and have built a set of Kinlin XC279s (BHS C472W) with 20f, 24r CX-Ray's and have had no problems with regard to stiffness, spokes going loose, etc. The Pacenti SL23 is the lightest wide rim I believe at around 450g so it would make a good choice for your needs.
 

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Hope you don't mind that I'm asking but, why you are not considering to buy some factory build wheelset?

You can buy just a few spokes extra for both wheels, while they are available on market so you shouldn't worry about anything.

I dont know your budget, but I would go for a Dura-Ace C24 TL.
 

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Not what the OP is asking but price wise I go Campy Neutron. Not easily accessible proprietary spokes yada yada, but its still my choice. Campy has the wide hub shell, asymmetrical rear spoke configuration down for a reasonable price.
 
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