Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 20 of 34 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
:confused:

I have a question. I've signed up for a century and am following the "easy century training-to ride 100 miles" found here....http://www.diablocyclists.com/RiderTips/EasyCenturyTrainingProgram.htm

and in Bicycling magainze.

My question is, the longest you ever ride in this plan is 65 miles during week 8 and week 9, then week 10 you jump to 100 miles. I'm currently in week 2 and everything is going fine, but just wondered...isn't that a big jump at the end? Thanks for any advice/support.

8 weeks and counting!!!! :D
 

·
tofurkey hunting
Joined
·
4,733 Posts
i don't know for sure, but i hear from a reliable source, that (at least in the bicycling article) the person who followed this regimine barely finished the century....and well after everyone else at that. when a good number of the rides revolve around <20 miles....i'm no expert, but this seems a bit suspect to me. again, same anonymous source tells me that bicycling had a more "agressive" plan for a century in that issue. perhaps it was more realistic.
 

·
Looks fast, rides slow
Joined
·
266 Posts
I guess the important question is: do you want the century training to be easy or the actual century to be easy? 10-week of training with only one 65-miler at the end sure sounds easy to me, but I doubt you'll have equally easy time on the actual ride with that little mileage.

I'm also training for my first century, and from everything that I've heard/heard it's wise to do at least one 75-miler before the big day. Maybe you can squeeze in longer rides near the end of your training?

K-Zero
 

·
50ft. Queenie
Joined
·
1,154 Posts
gigemaggs99 said:
:confused:

I have a question. I've signed up for a century and am following the "easy century training-to ride 100 miles" found here....http://www.diablocyclists.com/RiderTips/EasyCenturyTrainingProgram.htm

and in Bicycling magainze.

My question is, the longest you ever ride in this plan is 65 miles during week 8 and week 9, then week 10 you jump to 100 miles. I'm currently in week 2 and everything is going fine, but just wondered...isn't that a big jump at the end? Thanks for any advice/support.

8 weeks and counting!!!! :D
this sounds like a plan for someone who has basically no training under thier belt. if you are already riding, the first few weeks seem pretty easy. and the last few weeks appear to be kind of low on the milage. if your biggest ride prior to the century is only 65miles, you will really be hurting after 80miles. not that you cant do it...but it wont be pretty.

if your biggest ride is 75-80miles, without a problem, you can do 100 without too much problem.

GOOD LUCK!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,106 Posts
Need to get your butt in shape

gigemaggs99 said:
:confused:

I have a question. I've signed up for a century and am following the "easy century training-to ride 100 miles" found here....http://www.diablocyclists.com/RiderTips/EasyCenturyTrainingProgram.htm

and in Bicycling magainze.

My question is, the longest you ever ride in this plan is 65 miles during week 8 and week 9, then week 10 you jump to 100 miles. I'm currently in week 2 and everything is going fine, but just wondered...isn't that a big jump at the end? Thanks for any advice/support.

8 weeks and counting!!!! :D
Unless you are doing a very flat century and drafting others, you will be in the saddle for 6 or 7 hours during your century. No matter how well prepared you are in terms of aerobic capacity or strength, nothing will prepare you for 6 or 7 hours in the saddle other than lots of saddle time. When I completed my first century, I felt as if I could have done a lot more miles EXCEPT that my butt hurt so much that I couldn't sit and the soles of my feet hurt so much that I could not stand.
 

·
NeoRetroGrouch
Joined
·
6,491 Posts
gigemaggs99 said:
:confused:

I have a question. I've signed up for a century and am following the "easy century training-to ride 100 miles" found here....http://www.diablocyclists.com/RiderTips/EasyCenturyTrainingProgram.htm

and in Bicycling magainze.

My question is, the longest you ever ride in this plan is 65 miles during week 8 and week 9, then week 10 you jump to 100 miles. I'm currently in week 2 and everything is going fine, but just wondered...isn't that a big jump at the end? Thanks for any advice/support.

8 weeks and counting!!!! :D
I lead a century training program each summer for beginners starting in March with a 6 mile ride and doing the century in September. Note that it is 6 months, not 10 weeks.

I use a ride schedule out of one of Freil's books that goes by time for the long rides and the longest ride is 4 hours 2 or 3 weeks before the event. The century usually takes a little over 7 hours (ouch) and they have no problem with the distance.

For your 10 week program, you should be able to do the 100 with only having done 65 - but it will hurt. Why do people like to suffer?

TF
 

·
gazing from the shadows
Joined
·
27,207 Posts
Everyone is different, but I normally ascribe to this rule of thumb:

You can easily ride 150% of your normal long ride with not much problem.

You can ride 200% of your normal long ride, but it will hurt a lot.

That works for me, in miles or in hours. When I am doing 2 hour rides, a 3 hour ride will make me feel it a bit, and a 4 hour ride will wax me. If I do 20 miles in the spring, 30 will hurt a bit, but 40 would hurt a lot. By this rule of thumb, if you do a couple of 65 milers, you will have little problem doing 65+ 32.5 = 97.5. So you will feel it, but it won't kill you.

UNLESS there is a headwind, or more hills than you usually ride, or you ride faster than during training, or you don't eat/drink properly and your stomach shuts down.

Personally, I would want a bit more under my belt for a cushion, but if you can do 65 two weeks in a row you can certainly do 100.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,504 Posts
2 X rule of thumb

The key is how the person felt after the 65 mile ride. If you can complete that distance "comfortably" then a century should not be a problem, though you will be plenty tired. If the 65 miler was a struggle, then the century could be a death march. IME, you can reasonably do 2X the distance of your comfort zone. If you finish 50 miles feeling fine, the 100 is not insurmountable. Obviously things like wind, heat, humidity, hills, etc. can make any distance a problem, but assuming your 50 mile rides have dealt with those issues, 100 should not be a problem. The biggest mistake people make is not realizing how much they have to fuel and hydrate for the longer distance. I can easily do 50 miles on just a 20 oz. bottle of Coke, but I sure can't do 100 on 2 bottles of Coke.
 

·
Ti me up
Joined
·
1,242 Posts
Clicked your link, and have to say that program looks like a lot of junk miles to me. He's got you riding 6 days per week, with four of them being 12-18 miles in the later weeks, plus a ~25 and then your long ride for the week of 60-65. That seems like a lot of wasted days. Plus, it's pretty unrealistic for many of us to ride 6 days per week. In the last few weeks of the program, I'd much rather see you riding 3-4x/week and doing 2-3 rides of 25-35, plus your long building from 50 up to about 70 or so. I just don't see the point of having four 15-mile days per week.

Background - three years ago, I had never done a century, and the whole "century training" idea seemed like this huge thing. Now I've done quite a few, to the point where I only have to specifically train for one if I'm looking to set a time goal, or it's a particularly hilly course. So I'm no training expert, but I've been in your shoes, and not too long ago. If you can do a couple of 30s, plus a 60-70, for several weeks in a row, finishing a reasonable century course is very doable.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
76 Posts
Discussion Starter #10
Thanks to all who replied...

Thanks for the info and advice. I am up for a good challenge, I just didn't think it seemed consistent with the training schedule to increase each week's mileage by a couple of miles per week and then the last week jump up 15 more miles. I can and will do it.

Looks like now I need to read up on proper pre and during ride hydration and nutrition. Does anyone have any links or suggestions? For the hydration I purhcased a camel bak, it should be here next week. For the time being I use water bottles.

Thanks again for all your advice!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
see a nutritionist...

i've been riding recreationally for about 17 years and i've done at least one century each year during that time. but last year, at age 50, i did my first back-to-back centuries when i did the seattle-to-portland ride. i followed the training regimen on the cascade bicycling site and it worked out well. in fact, my girlfriend - a novice rider and first-time century rider followed the same regimen and finished well.
but one thing i also did that helped quite a bit was to see nutritionist. did the whole bit about keeping a food diary for a week or so and then discussed my diet and habits with her. while she didnt provide me with any earth-shattering advice, she did offer a few pointers that definitely helped. she was able to look at some of the things i was eating regularly and advise that i supplement those items with other things, eat more of other things and minimize other items. her advice was invaluable and i think it really helped me finish the ride in really good shape.
one of the best things, frankly, was that she advised that i didnt have to give my beloved portland microbrews. i'd been ready to give it up for the rest of my training, but she let me know that i didnt need to go to that extreme step. for that alone, she won my favor.
i always figure that while i may have good instincts about what i eat, it never hurts to talk with someone who deals with certain things for their living.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,347 Posts
gigemaggs99 said:
Thanks for the info and advice. I am up for a good challenge, I just didn't think it seemed consistent with the training schedule to increase each week's mileage by a couple of miles per week and then the last week jump up 15 more miles. I can and will do it.

Looks like now I need to read up on proper pre and during ride hydration and nutrition. Does anyone have any links or suggestions? For the hydration I purhcased a camel bak, it should be here next week. For the time being I use water bottles.

Thanks again for all your advice!
Unless this is an unsupported century you won't need the camelback. On supported centuries there are usually 4-5 stops. (The flier often tells you). Two bottles is fine.

I always take two bottles and fill one with plain water, the other with sports drink. Either whatever the organizers provide, or I bring my own mix if I don't think they'll have something I can stomach. With a bottle of each, if I suddenly get sick of sports drink between stops, I still have plenty of water to drink.

Nibble a bit of food at each stop. Figure you're burning about 500 calories/hr. You will need to replace much of that, but if you wait til lunch, the lunch that you'd have to eat would be huge! All that food weighs you down and takes blood away from your legs and lungs. If you eat something at each stop you'll do better. I always carry a caffeinated GU in case I misalculate the stops and start to bonk, or just start flagging.

Good luck and resist the urge to hammer at the beginning of the ride.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
95 Posts
very true...

i agree with everything ericm979 said. especially the advice to avoid hammering at the beginning of the ride. it'll take a lot of discipline to ride at your pace at the beginning of the ride, rather than following the rest of the rabbits who are bolting out at the beginning. for longer rides i like to divide the ride into quarters. ride the first quarter by just spinning, gradually increasing my effort. then i'll crank it up for the next two quarters and then, depending on how i feel i may really push it - if i've found a bunch of other riders who are riding at my pace - or i may knock my pace down a notch for the last quarter, if i'm not feeling all that strong. i know its a little game i play with myself, but it seems to help.
i agree that you really dont need the camelbak in the sense that there are always plenty of stops on most supported centuries. but i have noticed that i do drink a lot more water when i use the camelbak, simply because its easier to access it if you just have to suck on the tube, which is right near your mouth. i just dont drink as much or as regularly if i depend on my water bottles. i find that i'll usually drink it in larger gulps, if i use bottles, but i will continually sip, if i use the camelbak. and i've noticed that i do feel stronger if i sip continually. regardless, if i do use the camelbak, i always use it strictly for water and i'll put energy drink in the bottles.
you should experiment and see if your drinking habits are affected by whether you use a camelbak. for longer rides, its a heckuva lot more important to maintain steady and sufficient hydration, and for me, the camelbak helps in that regard.
 

·
Lizzie will ride free
Joined
·
3,156 Posts
I would second the spinning advice for the beginning. As everyone points out, it is very easy to go out too fast. Drop down a couple of teeth from what you would normally ride for the first 25 miles or so, and it will put a nice little restriction on any irrational exuberance.
 

·
The Wanderer
Joined
·
536 Posts
gigemaggs99 said:
:confused:

I have a question. I've signed up for a century and am following the "easy century training-to ride 100 miles" found here....http://www.diablocyclists.com/RiderTips/EasyCenturyTrainingProgram.htm

and in Bicycling magainze.

My question is, the longest you ever ride in this plan is 65 miles during week 8 and week 9, then week 10 you jump to 100 miles. I'm currently in week 2 and everything is going fine, but just wondered...isn't that a big jump at the end? Thanks for any advice/support.

8 weeks and counting!!!! :D
You are correct. The training schedule is designed for somebody to barely finish the century. If you look around on the site, there is another program "Century Training-With Strength To Spare". In the final weeks, you will be doing 71-75 miles. Much more realistic, if you can spare 6 days a week...

http://www.diablocyclists.com/RiderTips/StrenghtCenturyTrainingProgram.htm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
I'm an airline pilot, therefor I am out of town about 3-4 days a week. Does anyone have any idea how to modify the 'strength to spare' schedule to allow for only training 3-4 days per week? On the road, I can often use a stationary bike, but not always.

Thanks
Elguapo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
Elguapo9 said:
I'm an airline pilot, therefor I am out of town about 3-4 days a week. Does anyone have any idea how to modify the 'strength to spare' schedule to allow for only training 3-4 days per week? On the road, I can often use a stationary bike, but not always.

Thanks
Elguapo
Many programs will suggest you to train by time, not miles. Also will say increase intensity if time is not available. So convert the miles to time based on your anticipated century speed, if time is not available increase the intensity. A HR monitor helps on a stationary or spin bike. Try and follow your high intensity, long days with your rest days. And you HAVE to ramp it up 15-20% per week. Lighten up every 3rd or 4th week, then pick it up where you left off.
 

·
Looks fast, rides slow
Joined
·
266 Posts
Elguapo9 said:
I'm an airline pilot, therefor I am out of town about 3-4 days a week. Does anyone have any idea how to modify the 'strength to spare' schedule to allow for only training 3-4 days per week? On the road, I can often use a stationary bike, but not always.

Thanks
Elguapo
I'm riding 4 times a week for my century, and so far it's working out great. But I do power yoga twice a week so I'm still being active 6 times/week. Here's my typical week:

Mon - yoga
Tue - pace ride
Wed - yoga
Thu - fast ride/interval training
Fri - rest
Sat - long ride
Sun - recovery ride

If you only have two other days to ride beside your weekly long ride, I would make them count by riding hard (hills, intervals, etc.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
kyler2001 said:
You are correct. The training schedule is designed for somebody to barely finish the century. If you look around on the site, there is another program "Century Training-With Strength To Spare". In the final weeks, you will be doing 71-75 miles. Much more realistic, if you can spare 6 days a week...

http://www.diablocyclists.com/RiderTips/StrenghtCenturyTrainingProgram.htm
good thread. i, too, am training for a century, but it's not till september. i am also starting to train for a 31 or 62 mile ride may 7, 2006. i was using the Easy Century Training that the OP listed, but also thought that it was a lot of days riding and a lot to ride on the first long ride for someone who's not been riding much. this ride will be my first organized ride and, for me, my pace that i hope to ride is 15mph. .

can someone help me develop a plan that will have me riding 65 miles by may 7 that doesn't require me riding every day?

k-zero: your schedule looks good. instead of yoga, i am using an exercise ball trying to work on abs, back, core strength. could you suggest a length of time to ride or distance to ride on those 4 days??

thanks, karen.
 

·
It's in the game!
Joined
·
2,042 Posts
Suspect anything saying "Easy"

Ride 65 miles 3 times a week with a easy spin day of 20-25miles following the 65mile days and if there are hills on the century route then do a hill-repeat day once a week. That's your schedule but then give yourself some short easy rides(1hr) the last 3 days before the race with one of those days with 2 short max effort intervals(2-3mins).

It's not that hard that you gotta read an entire book because it only takes 3 sentences to tell someone how to train for one.
 
1 - 20 of 34 Posts
Top