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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It seems a common (and successful) training routine is to have easy day rides and hard day rides. Is it a crazy concept to have a bike for each purpose?

The easy day bike would be more upright, more compliant, and more comfortable to ride slowly, like a good steel touring bike with + size tires. The hard day bike would obviously be oriented to riding fast.

In addition to the comfort gaines, might there also be some psychological benefits for those who have a hard time riding slow on easy days. The easy day bike would help set the tone of the ride and discourage empromptu races.

Does anybody train like this?
 

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Downhill Juggernaut
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Um, sorta. My problem is that I always want to go fast, no matter what bike I'm on (well, fast for me anyways...). I have to make a conscious effort to just take my time. I don't even ride my "ghetto bike" as much anymore because I don't think it's fast enough. It's an old mountain bike with 26" slicks and smaller cranks. Shame too, it's a pleasure to ride and handles great. It's almost the perfect city bike. I just always seem to reach for the roadbike or the Cross Check instead because they are both faster and more efficient.

I do agree though, I seem to have an easier time going a bit slower with the Cross Check. But I use it for commuting and when I'm riding downtown to run errands, so the type of riding could help with that as well.
 

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Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
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JFR said:
It seems a common (and successful) training routine is to have easy day rides and hard day rides. Is it a crazy concept to have a bike for each purpose?

The easy day bike would be more upright, more compliant, and more comfortable to ride slowly, like a good steel touring bike with + size tires. The hard day bike would obviously be oriented to riding fast.

In addition to the comfort gaines, might there also be some psychological benefits for those who have a hard time riding slow on easy days. The easy day bike would help set the tone of the ride and discourage empromptu races.

Does anybody train like this?
I get what you mean about the fat tires etc., making you more likely to ride at appropriate recovery intensity, but this seems a bit much.

If my fast bike was so harsh that I couldn't do long easy miles on it, I'd be re-thinking my fast bike's fit, not getting another bike for easy days. I believe it's possible to be comfortable on a race-ready bike.

Ultimately, I think it comes down to money. Right now, I can only justify having one bike I ride regularly, because I spent a lot on it. When I have some more cash for it, I'll probably do something about a SS/fixie, just to mix things up, and I could get something that would be good for loaded touring, and I could get...

The list goes on, but my motivation for getting other types of bikes would not be a division between my comfy-but-slow bike and my back-breaking-but-fast bike.
 

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Clyde-o-Matic
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My approach is to have a road bike that comes out for nice days and a beater that is used in wet weather, pulling the kids, running errands, night, etc. The beater is set up much like the road bike in terms of fit/comfort but obviously carries more weight (triple ring, rack, fenders, lights, etc.) and is less aero. Psychologically, I find it that I'm more consisently in the right zones on easy days if I take the beater. The road bike wants to get out and crank and the beater is content to take in the scenery but it is mainly a mental thing.
 

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You're Not the Boss of Me
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Not necessarily a bad idea per se. I have an old steel Bianchi that I enjoy for the easy days, and use the Seven for more aggressive rides, but the one part that I wouldn't inherently support is doing your recovery rides on a totally different geometry (as you said, more upright, etc.).

Same (or similar) fitting beater, etc. can be just the thing.
 

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Home Brew User!
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JFR said:
It seems a common (and successful) training routine is to have easy day rides and hard day rides. Is it a crazy concept to have a bike for each purpose?

The easy day bike would be more upright, more compliant, and more comfortable to ride slowly, like a good steel touring bike with + size tires. The hard day bike would obviously be oriented to riding fast.

In addition to the comfort gaines, might there also be some psychological benefits for those who have a hard time riding slow on easy days. The easy day bike would help set the tone of the ride and discourage empromptu races.

Does anybody train like this?
Sounds like a great idea. I've been pushing a good friend who is a racer boy type to buy a bike specific for commuting (steel, fat tires, rack, etc). It is killing him but he finally picked up a used Jamis CX bike and is putting 32s and a rack on it.

I suspect he will grow to love it.

I'm not, never have been or never will be a racer so I can't really relate but I heard that what many Europeans say about americans is "they ride to fast on slow days and too slow on fast days".

It is my understanding that there is some real benefits to riding slow and easy on recovery days. The club racer mentality does not really allow for it though.
 
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