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Recycle King
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If you have never heard of Eddington Number, it's a number calculated by English Astrophysicist Arthur Eddington to predict the number of protons in the observable universe in the 1930's. Eddington, who was an avid bicyclist, applied a bicycle version of the Eddington Number to help him keep track of his lifetime riding achievement.

it is defined as "the largest integer E, where you have cycled at least E miles on at least E days. it also comes with clear progression targets for you to achieve ever-higher Eddington numbers. In other words, "how many more days riding of at least x miles do I ride to achieve that score?"

Out of curiosity, how many of you are struggling to to reach the next Eddington number like me? Last year, I finished the riding season with 41. So far this year, I have only managed to reach 32. Here is a link to help you calculate your if you have been tracking your rides via strava, ridewithgps, endomondo - Eddington & More

Here is a excel file to calculated if you don't use any of the online tracking sites - https://drive.google.com/file/d/0By1lwbJo4j95eFd2bWE4OTVPUTA/view?usp=sharing
 

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Out of curiosity, how many of you are struggling to to reach the next Eddington number like me? Last year, I finished the riding season with 41. So far this year, I have only managed to reach 32.
I'm a little confused by this. Do you mean that, in the last 41 days of the "riding season" (don't know what this means where you live) that you rode at least 41 miles each of those days? Or, that 41 was the highest Eddington number you achieved during the riding season? Or other?

Edit: OK, I see that nothing says that the days have to be consecutive, so it could be that, over the "season" you rode at least 41 mi on 41 days?

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It would not be precise, as I don't track things much, but my estimated number for this year shall not be disclosed in any event, as it would appear much too pathetic.

I am a little confused whether this is done on an annual or lifetime basis. You appear to describe both, so perhaps it can be done either way.

Over my 45 years or so of cycling, I'd guess that my number would be somewhere between 35 and 40. It will not increase in this lifetime.
 

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I only need 85 more centuries to reach an Eddington number of 100! For me it's not really a metric I closely follow, or try to improve. Just an interesting statistic to compare between years.
 

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Recycle King
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I'm a little confused by this. Do you mean that, in the last 41 days of the "riding season" (don't know what this means where you live) that you rode at least 41 miles each of those days? Or, that 41 was the highest Eddington number you achieved during the riding season? Or other?

Edit: OK, I see that nothing says that the days have to be consecutive, so it could be that, over the "season" you rode at least 41 mi on 41 days?

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Yes, 41 was my highest E# for last year = rode at least 41 miles on at least 41 days. No, it doesn't have to be consecutive. I meant so far this year. But it can be apply to your riding career. Eddington number can also be apply to running, swimming or anything you can think of.
 

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Recycle King
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I only need 85 more centuries to reach an Eddington number of 100! For me it's not really a metric I closely follow, or try to improve. Just an interesting statistic to compare between years.
Now you got me curious about mine since I started road cycling.
 

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it is defined as "the largest integer E, where you have cycled at least E miles on at least E days. it also comes with clear progression targets for you to achieve ever-higher Eddington numbers. In other words, "how many more days riding of at least x miles do I ride to achieve that score?"
This can be highly skewed. Let's say you ride 60 + on Saturday & Sunday (roughly 60 weekend days per season) and 30 on the weekdays. That's a lot of miles in a season, but if you do 59 rides of 60+, your Eddington number would still be 30. Ride one more 60 miler and it jumps to 60. Not very representative.
 

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This can be highly skewed. Let's say you ride 60 + on Saturday & Sunday (roughly 60 weekend days per season) and 30 on the weekdays. That's a lot of miles in a season, but if you do 59 rides of 60+, your Eddington number would still be 30. Ride one more 60 miler and it jumps to 60. Not very representative.
No I believe your eddington number would be 59, then when you did the 60th 60 miler it would be 60. It's not calculated by milage it's just a number that is ho many times you road at least X amount on miles on X amount of days.
Veloviewer churns out a grapgh that shows it pretty simply, but I'm not too good at explaining.

Eg for me it tells me my number is 29 because i've ridden 29 miles 30 times, but to get to a number of 30 I have to ride at least 30 miles 2 mire times as I have only ridden at least 30 miles 28 times. But to get to 31, I need to do at least 31 3 more times..but to get to 32 I have to ride at least 32 miles 15 times as I have only done (at least) 32 miles 17 times.

Its the at least part.
 

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This can be highly skewed. Let's say you ride 60 + on Saturday & Sunday (roughly 60 weekend days per season) and 30 on the weekdays. That's a lot of miles in a season, but if you do 59 rides of 60+, your Eddington number would still be 30. Ride one more 60 miler and it jumps to 60. Not very representative.
Well, it's representative of something. I think he envisioned it as a single number that would reflect both the total amount of riding you do, and the proportion of your riding that constitutes high-mileage days. It's quite a different thing than total miles. It can skew all kinds of ways. To maximize the Eddington number for a given number of total miles, you have to do only long rides.

I also think Eddington used it mainly on a lifetime/career basis, rather than annual.
 

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This can be highly skewed. Let's say you ride 60 + on Saturday & Sunday (roughly 60 weekend days per season) and 30 on the weekdays. That's a lot of miles in a season, but if you do 59 rides of 60+, your Eddington number would still be 30. Ride one more 60 miler and it jumps to 60. Not very representative.
E# would be 59 in that situation.
 

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I would have thought an Astrophysicist would have been smart enough to realize that miles is a poor measurement of anything but miles.
I have no idea what my Eddington number is but would assume it's higher than that most Mountain Bikers but it would be a big mistake to assume that higher number represents any more "riding achievement"
 

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I would have thought an Astrophysicist would have been smart enough to realize that miles is a poor measurement of anything but miles.
I have no idea what my Eddington number is but would assume it's higher than that most Mountain Bikers but it would be a big mistake to assume that higher number represents any more "riding achievement"
It is if one of your goals is ride longer rides, especially over a given time frame.
 

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It is if one of your goals is ride longer rides, especially over a given time frame.
Like I said: "miles is a poor measurement of anything but miles."

I get that miles are good for measuring miles (length in terms of distance). But distance doesn't say much about time and effort.

If I understand this correctly someone who moves from flat Florida to, say, hilly dirt road full Vermont would probably have a much lower Eddington score if they kept up the same time and effort because miles would be much slower. Would you say their "riding achievement" has decreased as the score would indicate? I wouldn't.

People who mountain bike hard trails "achieve" less then casual roadies because miles are so hard and slow in the woods? That's just foolish.
 
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