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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a set of Enve 6.7 tubulars with a Powertap SLC+. From a little research, the market rate for these to sell would be $2,200ish (maybe more)

For that money I could get a set of Flo 60/90 ($900)

and

A Flo Disc ($600)

and

A stages power meter ($700)

I really only race the 6.7s in triathlons, so the increased mass of the Flo wheels isn't a huge issue. I love the 6.7's but it would be nice to have a crank based power meter. Is there some failing in my logic? Someone other than my wife try to talk me out of this.
 

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Well ... given the use of the wheels, it's hard to talk you out of it :) ... if they were for road racing or crits, it would be much easier.

Your logic is sound and you will likely get more benefit from the power meter than anything when it comes to pacing for Tri's and or TT's should you start racing them.

From an aero perspective there is little difference between the Flo's and the Enve's ... but the Enve's are "MUCH" lighter, though on flat races you won't notice it much, if at all other than initial acceleration and small rollers.

I was originally going to get HED Jet 90/Disc until I ran across Flo wheels ... Then I purchased a 60/90 front set and a 90 rear and will pick up a disc before too long ... all for the price of a the original HED set I was looking at. 1200 miles later on the Flo's and I'm pretty impressed.
 

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I could see selling them to put a little money in your pocket, or to use elsewhere.....but to esentially trade for different configuration of the same thing I probably wouldn't bother.
But if you really want a crank based power meter I suppose it makes sense. Everything I've read (but I've never used either) seems to say the Power Tap is much better......but I can see the attraction of being able to change wheels and still have a power meter. Basically you'd be taking a step backwards (IMO) in every part you change for that ability though. Okay, you'd also have a disc so I suppose that's a bit of a positive too.
 

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I have a set of Enve 6.7 tubulars with a Powertap SLC+. From a little research, the market rate for these to sell would be $2,200ish (maybe more)

For that money I could get a set of Flo 60/90 ($900)

and

A Flo Disc ($600)

and

A stages power meter ($700)

I really only race the 6.7s in triathlons, so the increased mass of the Flo wheels isn't a huge issue. I love the 6.7's but it would be nice to have a crank based power meter. Is there some failing in my logic? Someone other than my wife try to talk me out of this.
In my opinion, if you are going to use the power meter properly, then it will make you faster than any wheel set in the world. There's really no substitute for hard work and I'm saying this as the guy who makes a living selling wheels ;).

I hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the opinions. I don't think the Flos will be faster (maybe the disc), but they will be clincher, which may* limit time spent at the side of the road fixing a flat.

I run these using Jantex tape, no glue. I realize this may increase rolling resistance, but it makes changing a tire a snap. You can all flog me now.

* the caveat here is that, in the 3 seasons I have used these wheels, I have never had a flat in competition. Several on training rides, but nothing where it counts.
 

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You have pretty much the optimal race day wheels for your triathlons. Keep them.

Save for a little while, and get the Stages powermeter too if that's what you really want, and then use it on your training rides. Alternatively pick up a PowerTap rear wheel for training on ebay/CL for about the same money (or less). The Flo wheels are a step backwards.
 

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Thanks for the opinions. I don't think the Flos will be faster (maybe the disc), but they will be clincher, which may* limit time spent at the side of the road fixing a flat.

I run these using Jantex tape, no glue. I realize this may increase rolling resistance, but it makes changing a tire a snap. You can all flog me now.

* the caveat here is that, in the 3 seasons I have used these wheels, I have never had a flat in competition. Several on training rides, but nothing where it counts.
A disc wheel is always your fastest option. Another more affordable option that doesn't require you to get rid of your ENVE wheels might be purchasing a wheel cover. Many of our customers don't want to spend the extra money on a disc so we recommend the wheels covers that wheelbuilder.com makes. It's about $80-$100 for the cover and you essentially turn your existing race wheel into a disc for race day.

Just a thought.
 
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