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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In a recent issue of Bicycling Pete Adeney (aka Mr. Money Mustache) said that "no one besides Tour de France riders need a bike that costs more than $1000." He says "the difference in the different rigid frame materials used in bikes is miniscule compared with the differences in tire size and pressure or the presence of suspension."

What are your thoughts?

I just ask for future reference because right now I'm just getting into road riding (at age 49) and am using a $300 2000 Gary Fisher Mamba mountain bike with Bontrager H2 26x1.5 tires put on it so I can be more comfortable on the road. I know eventually I'll be looking to move to a different type of bike and will be wondering how much I should really be putting into a bike.

Also, what do more expensive helmets offer that less costly helmets don't?

Obviously I'd think better protection for the skull, but how much better protection do you get in going from a $25 Bell Verge to a $45 Giro Revel to a $70 Giro Monza to a $135 Giro Ionos, etc.

Thank you very much for your help, advice, and thoughts!!!

TripleB
 

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This topic has been beaten to death, and even then the horse is still getting flogged.

TL;DR: Buy whatever bike you want and/or can afford.

Also, what do more expensive helmets offer that less costly helmets don't?
Usually it's more comfort, less weight, and better aerodynamics. It's certainly not more safety.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This topic has been beaten to death, and even then the horse is still getting flogged.

My apologies...pretty excited about getting into road cycling and get a bit over zealous with my questions!

Sorry about that!

I appreciate the information on helmets!

TripleB

 

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In a recent issue of Bicycling Pete Adeney (aka Mr. Money Mustache) said that "no one besides Tour de France riders need a bike that costs more than $1000." He says "the difference in the different rigid frame materials used in bikes is miniscule compared with the differences in tire size and pressure or the presence of suspension."

What are your thoughts?

I just ask for future reference because right now I'm just getting into road riding (at age 49) and am using a $300 2000 Gary Fisher Mamba mountain bike with Bontrager H2 26x1.5 tires put on it so I can be more comfortable on the road. I know eventually I'll be looking to move to a different type of bike and will be wondering how much I should really be putting into a bike.

Also, what do more expensive helmets offer that less costly helmets don't?

Obviously I'd think better protection for the skull, but how much better protection do you get in going from a $25 Bell Verge to a $45 Giro Revel to a $70 Giro Monza to a $135 Giro Ionos, etc.

Thank you very much for your help, advice, and thoughts!!!

TripleB
You've already seen the correct answers regarding helmets. The Bicycling writer got it right about frame stiffness/tire pressure. The only real improvements in frame ride quality can be found in the Trek Domane/Silque and the Pinarello w/ the shock in the monostay. They are actual suspension that will offer much more bump absortion than anything else done to this point...I'm primarily talking about Specialized's ridiculous "zertz" frame inserts and seatstays that are designed to "flex".
 

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... "no one besides Tour de France riders need a bike that costs more than $1000.
i assume you both mean a new, modern bike purchased at retail.

my grocery getter is a pristine '76 motobécane grand record i wouldn't sell for $1,000.

wouldn't sell either of my other two vintage bikes for that either.
 
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I pretty much agree with him. 1500 bucks will get you a solid aluminum frame with at least 105 components, if not ultegra.

I'd probably put a little extra in to some decent tires and wheels that won't fall apart if necessary, but you can hand build a solid, light wheelset for 300 bucks.

The powermeter and computer are going to cost a grand more, though, unless you go used. And those are as important as the bike if you're serious about maximizing your abilities.

Edit. Did you say 1000? Can you even get a bike for 1000? You are probably going to get some pretty crappy components (brakes, cranks, seat, wheels) at that pricepoint that you'll likely have to replace due to durability or fit/comfort issues.
 

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The most expensive road bike I ever owned was also my least favorite. I sold it and "downgraded" to a less expensive, but better bike for me. However the less expensive bike was still more than a grand. That's just my experience though and I wouldn't steer someone that way.

I would say that a huge part of a good riding experience is keeping whatever bike you have in good working condition: lubed up chain, properly adjusted shifters/brakes, tires properly inflated, wheels true............. etc...
I ride by people all the time with squeaky chains and improperly adjusted derailleurs. I was in a group ride the other day with a guy who's chain was constantly rubbing his front derailleur. I'm easy going in general but that would drive me nuts.

I'd ride a properly tuned up Tiagra equipped aluminum bike before an out of tune DA equipped wonder bike.
 

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I recently upgraded from an aluminum Trek 1.1 with entry level components to a carbon Trek Domane S5 with shimano 105 components.

When I first started riding the Domane.. I thought it was nice, comfortable, worth the money, good investment.. but nothing to go completely bonkers about. Then after riding the Domane for 100 miles and then getting back on to my old aluminum 1.1... I literally yelled... HOLY ****. That was when the Eureka moment hit me. Yeah.. carbon frame and shimano 105 components make a world of difference.

Moral of the story is: sub-$1K bikes are great to start out on and will last many years if they are serviced regularly and properly maintained. But, carbon frames and 105 components are well worth the extra $700-$1000.
 

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These discussions are always funny, especially when those with so-called "cheap" bikes say that no one needs anything beyond 105. Why draw the line in the sand there? Why not get a BD Claris bike for $499 and be done? Who "needs" a better bike than that? What will a 105 equipped bike do for them beyond the $499 bike? I understand it won't make you faster so what is it about your engine that requires better gears? Will it last 2-4x as long? Or do you just desire something better and don't need someone else determining your needs, your pricepoint?
 

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i'm curious what vehicle the author drives.

and how large his house is.

and what toilet paper he uses.

and whether he puts more salt than is necessary for the body on his food.

I guess the author is a pretty smart guy as he's clearly found a way to get paid to write 'the sky is blue'.

Triple B I think the issue is buy what floats your boat because you will ride it more and that's the goal.
 

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Hey Hyper I too just upgraded from a much loved Trek 1.1. Almost went Al but decided for the money i'd try carbon and ended up going 105.

I've got about 160 miles on the new bike and keep saying i'm going to do another ride on the 1.1 to compare but it hasn't happened yet.

cx the zertz are indeed goofy looking but that bike is very, very smooth. my guess is most of it comes from the seatpost.

105 shifts waaaay better than the 2300 I had before. don't need it at all but by golly it is nice! going small to big ring and over two to three on the cassette at the same time is childs play now!
 

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A $5 hammer from Home Depot will work fine for hanging pictures in your house, but I wouldn't use it to build a deck, let alone to build a house.
 

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cx the zertz are indeed goofy looking but that bike is very, very smooth. my guess is most of it comes from the seatpost.

105 shifts waaaay better than the 2300 I had before. don't need it at all but by golly it is nice! going small to big ring and over two to three on the cassette at the same time is childs play now!
You are wrong, the seatpost does almost nothing. In fact there are several normal seatposts, even aluminum ones, that do a FAR better job at adding vertical compliance. The article is on point and so is CX.


Last year I bought a $700 BMC GF02. It's one hell of a bike.
 

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Hey Hyper I too just upgraded from a much loved Trek 1.1. Almost went Al but decided for the money i'd try carbon and ended up going 105.

I've got about 160 miles on the new bike and keep saying i'm going to do another ride on the 1.1 to compare but it hasn't happened yet.

cx the zertz are indeed goofy looking but that bike is very, very smooth. my guess is most of it comes from the seatpost.

105 shifts waaaay better than the 2300 I had before. don't need it at all but by golly it is nice! going small to big ring and over two to three on the cassette at the same time is childs play now!
105 is amazing to me. I have 2300 also on my 1.1! Yes... it's crazy how much smoother and better the 105 is compared to 2300.

The Domane S5 was perfect for me. I didn't need Ultegra or disc brakes... I was more concerned with the Domane's frame geometry that suits my style of riding. Still love the 1.1... but it's not even in the Domane's league. The 1.1 will be a nice backup bike when and if the Domane is in the shop.
 

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You are wrong, the seatpost does almost nothing. In fact there are several normal seatposts, even aluminum ones, that do a FAR better job at adding vertical compliance. The article is on point and so is CX.


Last year I bought a $700 BMC GF02. It's one hell of a bike.
What does the price of a used bike have to do with this?

If it's not the zertz and not the seatpost then it must be frame design eh? per OP the author says 'suspension' is what works. do you not understand that 'suspension' is just flex of a material? ever look at a leaf spring? how about a torsion bar suspension? I guess we need to call Porsche and tell them the torsion bars they used for so long to build one of the greatest sports/race cars of all time wasn't really a suspension at all.

heck even a coil spring is just flexing of a material. if the author does not understand this then he is poorly informed and thus talking out of his ass because he fails to understand what 'suspension' is.
 

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i think he means that unless it looks like a coil spring it's not really suspension.

which of course is nonsense. it's intellectually akin to claiming airplanes fly by witchcraft.

or he just doesn't like specialized.
 

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In a recent issue of Bicycling... said that "no one besides Tour de France riders need a bike that costs more than $1000." He says "the difference in the different rigid frame materials used in bikes is miniscule compared with the differences in tire size and pressure or the presence of suspension."
What are your thoughts?
Consider the source..."Bicycling" is, IMHO, *not* a magazine for serious road cyclists. It's really for beginners or casual folks. So that advice is likely OK if that's where you fall, or aim to be with the sport long term.

What you mostly have here in this forum are fairly serious cycling enthusiasts. If you plan to ride more than 3000 miles a year, say 4000-5000 and up, you should get a real deal road bike. First, and foremost, it should be the correct size, and fitted to you by a professional. Plan on investing in clothes, shoes, better tires, etc. Maybe a new saddle, while working with a shop to try a few to find the one best for you.

See - no mention of frame type or stiffness or suspension anywhere above.

If you want to keep it casual and ride 10-15 miles every other weekend, almost anything that rolls and is somewhat comfortable and works OK will do.

Unless you are into status and looks. Then you'll need the best, most expensive machine, likely from Europe. So when your friends visit you can point it out to them with your Rolexed arm, in the garage hanging next to your Porsche.
 

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This topic has been beaten to death, and even then the horse is still getting flogged.

TL;DR: Buy whatever bike you want and/or can afford.



Usually it's more comfort, less weight, and better aerodynamics. It's certainly not more safety.
this about says it all.

I really really like Money Mustache's ideas, lifestyle example and his blog. Everyone should read his blog end to end. He loves using bikes, but he ain't no cycling enthusiast like folks on this forum. He's preaching to a different choir.

oh I do agree with the Mustache about helmet though. The pricing makes no sense, no correlation to safety, long as ya avoid Aliexpress fake helmets. minor aero, styling, comfort, and features (gopro mount, built in lights, etc) might be in play though
 
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