Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
There's a useful thread on Ti bikes here: http://forums.roadbikereview.com/bi...anium-road-bike-build-352593.html#post4981877, and I am considering a custom one. I've narrowed my list of builders to Seven, Moots, Eriksen, Mosaic, Lynskey, Strong, and 333Fab. Of these, Mosaic is local to me - I could go over on lunch break to talk to them - but also the newest to the scene.

Does anyone have any experience buying a bike from Mosaic? Their location puts them at the top of my list, but their relative inexperience gives me pause.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
No direct experience but i know people who went Mosaic and they were happy. I've read they are similar in many ways to say a Firefly in their design and build philosophy, very small shop that has a strong commitment.. Seven is a much larger builder which brings benefits and disadvantages. Seven has a huge database of proven fits. They know what works and doesn't. If it was me I would limit my self to those two choices and decide if you want the small shop or the larger one. You really can't go wrong with either. it's controversial but i don't really consider the other choices in the same league(but they're not all equal)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
Honestly, if you have the money to make a good titanium bike, and if the guys are locals, do it with the locals. I had a Moots, it was awesome, and I wish I never sold it (though a part of me thinks it would have been stolen out here in China lol)

Honestly I doubt it's much of a risk. Just make sure you get a good fit and that these guys can make a bike to fit you. Smooth sailing from there.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
103 Posts
Good bikes, from what I hear. They tend to be on the stiffer, racier, and more responsive end of the spectrum, unlike many Ti bikes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,658 Posts
Good bikes, from what I hear. They tend to be on the stiffer, racier, and more responsive end of the spectrum, unlike many Ti bikes.
They use rider specific tubes. The only thing they'd 'tend to be' is how people ask them to be.

That's the problem with looking at reviews for custom bikes. People end up thinking the maker's bikes 'are like' what Joe Sixpack who wrote a good long review says his is like.

I test rode several Seven's before I bought mine. Same model but one of them was made for a woman much lighter than me and one was made for a man who had a lot of power and raced crits. Same model bike. They were nothing at all like each other. I'm sure Mosaic also has the skills and tube resources to do just about anything also so I wouldn't say their bikes are a certain way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
They use rider specific tubes. The only thing they'd 'tend to be' is how people ask them to be.

That's the problem with looking at reviews for custom bikes. People end up thinking the maker's bikes 'are like' what Joe Sixpack who wrote a good long review says his is like.

I test rode several Seven's before I bought mine. Same model but one of them was made for a woman much lighter than me and one was made for a man who had a lot of power and raced crits. Same model bike. They were nothing at all like each other. I'm sure Mosaic also has the skills and tube resources to do just about anything also so I wouldn't say their bikes are a certain way.
This! Which is why a good well thought out spec is very important here and why a good rapore with the bike builder almost as critical.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,658 Posts
Of course...the know-it-alls have arrived....


I have heard this not just from guys on Mosaics and I spoke to Mosaic as well. I guess they could soften it up if you wanted them too but they DO tend to build stiffer racier bikes.

Review: Mosaic RT-1 titanium road bike frame | road.cc
I read that review when I was shopping and am not going to re-read it but from what I remember the guy says his bike didn't fit the negative stereotype of Ti being a wet noodle (to paraphrase). I think pretty much everyone but the reviewer knows stereotypes about Ti, as with other materials, are just that and don't apply especially when talking custom but whatever.
Okay, Mosaic bikes don't fit an outdated stereotype about Ti (unless that's what you ask for).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
I have a Ti Firefly. and have ridden a friend's Serotta Ti bike. Have yet to ride any Ti bike that feels like a wet noodle. Thought the analogy referred to some poorly built stuff out of the 1990's
 

·
Los Barriles, BCS, Mexico
Joined
·
1,456 Posts
The only wet-noodle ti bike I've had, and I've owned many, was a Colnago Bi-titan. Very spaghetti-ish.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,796 Posts
late to the party, but OP never replied, so maybe an OPEN? question.

@pncguy = Welcome to the Forum.
Great question about Ti!
Your list of builders was impressive,
How could one miss your target???

My answer would be = any miss in the finished product might be due to misunderstanding or poor/lack of communication. Of 3 customs,the best 2 were hand measured&fitted by the builder for bike dreams i called out to them. It was their geometry for the description i provided.

On your list, 'in person' gets a heads up. I walked into Calfee Design and got a preliminary fit without any suggestion for an order. And a long courtesy ride on a Record equipped TetraPro. A few years back this was.

Moots, Ericksen, Strong, and many others..... Holland, deSalvo, so many others...all very desirable.
Thanks for buying from American craftsmen.

edit: The best fit (for my stated purpose) was from a small builder who took several measurements, before and while riding a trainer for 30min on my favorite bike, at varying intensity levels. A steel builder.

Make sure the fork is selected when overall dimensions/geometries are planned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Wow, that site, lifeisabeautifuldetail is awesome. The several part post on building a bike with Mosaic is very informative and a great read. It is helpful if you want to evaluate what your experience might be with Mosaic.

As of now, if I were to go custom, I think I'd be going with Eriksen or Strong. The reason is that they are both very small operations and the attention will be personal. My initial contact with both builders is wonderful and very confidence-inspiring. Eriksen gets higher scores from being closer to me: I can drive up to Steamboat to meet with them. Strong gets higher scores because I think I will really enjoy working directly with the guy who will be designing and building the frame. And the fact that Carl works one bike from start to finish is pretty cool to me.

BUT: with Christmas here, I've worked through a lot of needs and wants. I need a more comfortable bike than my aluminum 1991 Cannondale RS600. I don't like carbon. So that means I want a steel or Ti bike. I could afford a custom, but I am 98% sure that I'm going to go with a Jamis Quest Elite. Yeah, it sure won't be as nice as any of the bikes we've been talking about. But I can also then buy one for my wife. And one for my son. And still have money left over. And I think it hits what I need, even if it doesn't give me all I want.

Thanks to everyone for input!
 

·
Crank Addict
Joined
·
1,943 Posts
Wow, that site, lifeisabeautifuldetail is awesome. The several part post on building a bike with Mosaic is very informative and a great read. It is helpful if you want to evaluate what your experience might be with Mosaic.

As of now, if I were to go custom, I think I'd be going with Eriksen or Strong. The reason is that they are both very small operations and the attention will be personal. My initial contact with both builders is wonderful and very confidence-inspiring. Eriksen gets higher scores from being closer to me: I can drive up to Steamboat to meet with them. Strong gets higher scores because I think I will really enjoy working directly with the guy who will be designing and building the frame. And the fact that Carl works one bike from start to finish is pretty cool to me.

BUT: with Christmas here, I've worked through a lot of needs and wants. I need a more comfortable bike than my aluminum 1991 Cannondale RS600. I don't like carbon. So that means I want a steel or Ti bike. I could afford a custom, but I am 98% sure that I'm going to go with a Jamis Quest Elite. Yeah, it sure won't be as nice as any of the bikes we've been talking about. But I can also then buy one for my wife. And one for my son. And still have money left over. And I think it hits what I need, even if it doesn't give me all I want.

Thanks to everyone for input!
Yes... I thought that blog was really well done.

Have you seen that Lynskey is blowing out a bunch of left over stock on eBay? Frames are going for a fraction of the price. You may not get the full custom treatment, but you'll still get the quality of a US made Ti frame.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
362 Posts
I just received my Mosiac RT-1. I have ridden it and can say it seems stiffer than my Moots Vamoots RSL. Here are some pictures of it that the shop took.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top