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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm up for new glasses, and I'm debating whether to order a pair of prescription sunglasses to go with my "straight" set or hit someplace like Performance for frames to use prescription inserts with normal sunglasses.
I wear glasses all the time (don't need them for reading, but anything past about 3 feet is a blur). My experience with all kinds of clip-ons and add-ons has been pretty dismal--hard to keep clean, scratch easily when dust gets between the two lenses, look too dorky even for a guy old enough not to care much about looking dorky. Anybody have stories, recommendations, lamentations?
Thanks.
 

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la dolce vita
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I've had both. The inserts allow you to change the color of the lens which is a benefit, but the other ones fit better to your face (they don't stick as far out) and in my opinion look better.
 

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Squirrel Hunter
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Rudy Project

I have been using Rudy Project Rydons the last few years with Rx inserts. Working great and when my prescription changes the cost are reasonable to change. Sunglass lenses can be changed although I have found the racing red lense to be all purpose for nearly all of my riding. Have some clear lenses I will use for night or rain.

Previous used custom prescription Oakleys which had great optics but are way over priced and after a dismal warranty issue where they lied to me I will never buy or recommend another Oakley product.

Some time ago had a pair of Bolle glasses with inserts and experienced many of the complaints/experiences you refer to. Things have changed alot with inserts, give the new ones a try.
 

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I used the Bolle inserts and glasses for a years, until I finally said screw it and had Lasix surgery. The Bolle inserts were expensive ($30+) and they included nose pieces. If you wore them a lot, the rubber on the nose pieces eventually breaks off from the frame. As you might imagine, it's not as comfortable anymore to wear them! So another $30 and whatever another prescription fill costs....

Another issue is that your choices for glasses are usually limited. If you buy the inserts but don't like the choices available, you're stuck, unless you want to go to another manufacturer and start over again. $$$$$$
 

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n00bsauce
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I had Rudy Project RB3 sunglasses before I had lasik surgery 2 months ago. I found them very good at doing their job. I chose the RB3 model because the inserts used have the least amount of curvature and are the easiest to mount prescritive lenses of all the brands and models I looked at, and I looked at a lot. I never had problems with fogging or scratching. The only scratches were from where the prescriptive lens rubbed the outer sunglass lens. This was never a problem because it was where the frame of the insert touched the outer lens and you can't see through the prescriptive lens frame anyway.

RB3's look like any other swoopy pair of sunglasses. They don't stick out any farther than other models. Some have found their eyelashes rub against the prescriptive insert. This was not a problem for me and there's a lot a adjustability in the RB3 frame. I chose the insert type frame because I wanted to be able to change lens color and couldn't see paying the price to have several pairs of prescription sunglasses. Total cost, with clear and dark gray lenses, inserts and prescription lenses was $180. I still wear them, just without the prescription insert. I want a pair of brown polarized lenses for fly fishing and a yellow or orange pair for low contrast situations. It's great having one pair of sunglasses for many different conditions. I also like the flip up feature but that was more important when I used the prescription lenses than it is now. It looks dorky but when you go into a low light situation it's nice to be able to flip up the sunglass lenses but still see through the prescription lenses. Now I usually just take them off (lasik is fantastic!). I've also worn glasses my whole life (since I was 5 and I'm 53).
 

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Old Tunnel Road
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DaddyO Ray Bans

I went from Rudy Project prescription bifocal inserts to DaddyO Ray Ban prescription blended bifocals. I have to say it is so much better wearing one set of lenses rather than two sets (and really two frames). Easier to clean and greater clarity of vision as you are only looking through one set of lenses. The caveat is that the optician must be able to make your lenses work within the frame you choose. Some prescriptions may not work on lenses that are curved (curve is modest in the DaddyO's) and you may have to search around for the inset system that works best for you. Another good thing about having prescription sunglasses is you can wear them for all non-riding activities as well. I can't change the lenses out so I opted for a good medium polarized polycarbonate lense.
 

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I have had various solutions over the years. The Bolle inserts were the worst. They were uncomfortable with the shield further away from the face than normal. They would fog up between the lenses and they were a pain to take apart to clean. I had an optomotrist make lenses for wrap-around frames. They were better than the Bolle but did have some distortion, expecially at the periphery. I now have Oakley made perscription sunglasses. They must be ordered from Oakley by an optomotrist and are not cheap but they give me the clearest vision of all. They have been worth the extra cost to me.

Jim
 

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Couple of thoughts

I focus on Cross racing, where the efforts are generally intense. Previously I wore contacts, but had troubles. In particular, in cooler weather my eyes tended to water and I lost several contacts during races. Loosing a contact in a cross race is a recipe for disaster. I also have bad allegies (watery itchy eyes) in the spring.

I was all set to get inserts like those you are considering, but several cross veterans advised against it on because they had troubles with fogging between the two lenses.

I finally, ordered two sets of Tifosi prescription glasses, one clear and one a sort of general use orange. Although more expensive than the insert option, I could not be happier. If you choose a tint carefully one pair will cover almost all lighting conditions. I bought the clear for winter time overcast cross days, but have used this pair only a few times to date (still when I needed them I was glad to have them).

Hope this helps you decide.

jhr
 

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Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
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I have whatever the cheapo Performance ones with inserts are. I like them just fine, and for the money they are excellent. I'd buy them again, if I didn't have stars in my eyes for upgrading next time my prescription changes.

Here are the caveats:

1. Get the lenses done through Performance. If there's a problem (say your optometrist breaks the insert like mine did), you'll be happier if you've got someone who understands customer service to cry to. I superglued them and they're fine, but they don't look good (but since nobody else sees the inserts but me, who cares).

2. There can be a little "doubling" of reflections sometimes. When I first got them, it seemed I was seeing more of my own face or the doubling than of the road, but now I don't see it much at all. I don't know if I've changed how I wear them, how clean I keep them (very), or just gotten used to it, but it's fine now.

3. If you have a heavy prescription, you may experience distortion. A friend of mine has a set of the same ones, and his lenses make everything look smaller than normal. His optometrist says that's a normal effect of putting a strong scrip in such small/curved lenses. My pal can see clearly, but is so disconcerted by the size/distance perception change that he won't wear them. I don't blame him. My own prescription is almost all for astigmatism, so my lenses are quite thin and light, and I have no distortion problems.
 

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Keeping up with Junior said:
I have been using Rudy Project Rydons the last few years with Rx inserts. Working great and when my prescription changes the cost are reasonable to change. Sunglass lenses can be changed although I have found the racing red lense to be all purpose for nearly all of my riding. Have some clear lenses I will use for night or rain.

Previous used custom prescription Oakleys which had great optics but are way over priced and after a dismal warranty issue where they lied to me I will never buy or recommend another Oakley product.

Some time ago had a pair of Bolle glasses with inserts and experienced many of the complaints/experiences you refer to. Things have changed alot with inserts, give the new ones a try.
Oakley Rx rules!
 

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I've gone both routes and now use Oakley Rx inserts for cycling

I have used both prescriptions Sunglasses, with progressive correction, and the Oakley's I have now for cycling. Both have good points and bad.
Using prescription sunglasses does give you the chance to wear them when not cycling and you can have them in your exact prescription with progressive correction, if needed, and polarized which is a plus here in FL. The downside is that you only have one lens color, they may not fit as well for cycling as cycling specific frames, and they may actually cost more.
I got Oakley Rx inserts in an M Frame last year and really like them. I have both a very dark lens for Summer and a medium tint for the remainder of the year. They actually fit better than my regular glasses and I don't have any fear of them sliding off my nose, etc. during heavy efforts. Downsides: Cost has been mentioned above, about $375 from my local optical shop for the initial lens and frame set. Also, they can't do them in a progressive correction and there are some limits as to what single vision prescriptions they can do with them. Also, no polarized lens are available. I did have a warranty issue with the first lens I got last year, but my shop sent it back to Oakley and 10 days later I had a new lens, no questions asked.
I'll stick with the Oakleys for cycling and the prescription sunglasses for everything else.
 

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n00bsauce
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Zeal gets uniformly great reviews but they still don't solve the main problem with dedicated prescription sunglasses. Unless you're willing to spend a good amount of cash for several pair you have to compromise with a do it all one color lens. I wasn't willing to live with this compromise. I ride road and mountain bike. I often ride in the late evening and at night. Eye protection is a must and you can't ride in low light or the dark with shades. Even orange or yellow is too much tint for me. I don't like polarized lenses for bike riding but they are a necessity for fishing. I previously used fit over polarized sunglasses for fishing because they worked. They are definitely a dorky solution but on a trout stream it's not such a big deal. Now that I don't wear glasses I want a good pair of polarized sunglasses. I can spend about the same amount of money on a new pair or another set of lenses for my Rudy Projects. One pair of sunglasses to keep track of is bad enough. Two put me on the edge. I also find that red/orange/yellow sunglasses don't cut it in bright light. I need darker shades but the yellow variety would be really nice in flat light conditions and in dark woods. I've just got too many demands for one lens color to satisfy and that's why I like interchangeable lenses. I'd go broke buying 4 different prescription pairs of sunglasses and I'd surely lose one or more in short order.
 

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Rudy Project...

I just got a pair of Rudy Apache SX glasses with polarized prescription bifocal lenses. They could even do my strong -5.25 correction. Amazing clarity even at the edges of the lenses. I can even read with them. My local optometrist ordered them directly from Rudy Rx.
 

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GMS65 said:
Has anybody tried a pair from Zeal Optics? They seem like a great alternative to the prescription inserts:

http://www.zealoptics.com/index.php
I've got the Zeal Lazors, with clear, amber and gray lenses. Work great, though there is some distortion with the wrap-style frame. Doesn't bother me, but it does some people. Plus they are expensive. I think I paid over $350 for the frames and three prescription lenses. 'Course at the time I had a medical flex spending account that was use-or-lose, so the money would have been wasted anyway.
 

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It is all about comfort and seeing

I buy a saddle for comfort and glasses for safety.

Maui Jims.

TT
 

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Daylight Fading
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Cory

It sounds like you're only slightly near-sighted, so I'd consider dropping some good dough on a prescription Rx. Worst case, if you crash and break them, sounds like you could see well enough to get home. The optics that you should be able to get through a dedicated pair (AR coating, polarization) will help a lot more than the bulkier insert type option.

Hope this helps.

BT
 

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Adidas Evil Eye Sunglasses with optical insert

I have been using these for several months for both regular and cycling purposes. I am very pleased with the result. In the past, I have had difficulty getting my Rx prescription fitted into a sunglass frame that has an 8-base curve because one eye requires a large magnification and the lenses need to be bifocal. There is no problem with the Adidas optical insert in terms of fitting the presciption. The insert fits firmly and securely in the frame. There is no movement or vibration. The frame is excellent. The arms of the frame can be adjusted so that the frame sits closer or farther from the face with the result that my eyelashes do not touch the lenses. The frame has a detachable sweat bar and this may or may not be a reason why my eyes have not been bothered by perspiration. To control perspiration, I also use a do-rag/skull cap under my helmet.

The frame has a 10-base curve which I would never have previously considered given my prescription. A 10-base curve means that the eyes are fully covered. For this reason, an anti-glare coating was not required on the insert lenses, which saves a bit of money. I purchased my frame at an optician in Canada. I bought extra lenses at www.sunglassesgiant.com who is located in California.
 

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2nd for Daddio-0. I got a pair this last winter. They are great. With a high index, I wasn't able to do anything that had much wrap to them. These are still nice looking but allow for a higher index lense.

I had a pair of Rudy Rx's with the inserts and hated them. Fogging was a big problem. I was on the upper end of the it's ability to handle the high index, and had some distortion with them

There is also some guy in CO that has a special process for doing high index wraps. I think it would be cool, but since a good friend is my optomotrist, I spend my $$ with him.
 
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