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RBR Veteran Opinionater
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Thought I'd share this interesting little communique from Specialized.

I have a fact 8 s-works tarmac - 2006. It's a frim ride, more like alu than steel, and I got to wondering about how stiff 10 and 11 are. Which brought other questions to mind. Here's what I asked, and the answer:

To [email protected].

I understand that the higher number indicates higher strength to weight when rating carbon fiber. My question is strength in non-ride load conditions. For example, if a bike falls and the top tube strikes a hard object, is a fact 6 frame better able to withstand the impact because a thicker tube was required due to the lesser carbon used? Would a fact 11 frame in the same scenario be more likely to break because the carbon used is so strong that a very thin tube wall is all that is needed? Or does the higher strength carbon also yield better strength against such an impact?
Thanks, Bruce Jennings



Bruce,

In fact the 6r carbon would hold up a little better to outside impacts but not because the walls are thick but actually the higher modules carbon is actually more brittle. We can go higher than 11r carbons to make it stiffer and lighter but it would probably snap in half after a few rides. Don't be afraid though we still design our bikes for impact we understand that is going to happen.

-Zane


Specialized Customer Service/Online Store
1137 South 3800 West
Salt Lake City UT 84104
877-808-8154
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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brujenn said:
Thought I'd share this interesting little communique from Specialized.

I have a fact 8 s-works tarmac - 2006. It's a frim ride, more like alu than steel, and I got to wondering about how stiff 10 and 11 are. Which brought other questions to mind. Here's what I asked, and the answer:

To [email protected].

I understand that the higher number indicates higher strength to weight when rating carbon fiber. My question is strength in non-ride load conditions. For example, if a bike falls and the top tube strikes a hard object, is a fact 6 frame better able to withstand the impact because a thicker tube was required due to the lesser carbon used? Would a fact 11 frame in the same scenario be more likely to break because the carbon used is so strong that a very thin tube wall is all that is needed? Or does the higher strength carbon also yield better strength against such an impact?
Thanks, Bruce Jennings



Bruce,

In fact the 6r carbon would hold up a little better to outside impacts but not because the walls are thick but actually the higher modules carbon is actually more brittle. We can go higher than 11r carbons to make it stiffer and lighter but it would probably snap in half after a few rides. Don't be afraid though we still design our bikes for impact we understand that is going to happen.

-Zane


Specialized Customer Service/Online Store
1137 South 3800 West
Salt Lake City UT 84104
877-808-8154
Makes sense. To my way of thinking, raising the STW ratio lowers durability. This is why when I started my search for my first CF bike I focused on midrange bikes. Not just for price, but because an 18 lb. +/- bike would suite me fine. And hopefully the frame would have a pound or so 'extra' material to hold it together for awhile. I buy 'long term', so durability matters.

I don't know if you've ridden the newer Spec CF bikes, but I'd guess you'd find the ride a little more refined than you describe your '06. I believe the '08 Tarmac Comp uses 8r carbon and IMO the ride is similar to some steel bikes I've ridden.
 
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