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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I like the look of them.
Is there any purpose to their design ?
How do they ride and more importantly, climb ?

Thank you


Yours

Doug.
 

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I believe they were designed to ride on snow in the woods.

One of the Nordic ski centers in NH allows and even rents fat bikes to use in their trails once a week. One of the rules for riding on the ski trails is you may not have any more than 10 PSI in your tires.
 

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They're designed to ride on soft surfaces, sand as well as snow.

Climb? Very slowly, I'd think. Not what they're made for.
 

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Fat Bikes look cool, plus I bet they are fun to ride. Framed makes a carbon fat bike that I would love to purchase sometime... the Marquette with 27.5 x 3" tires. Unfortunately, a cyclocross/gravel bike would be more practical for me at this time and will most likely be my next bike purchase. It only snows for about 3 months out of the year where I live and a Fat Bike would be overkill on rail trails in the spring, summer and fall months.
 

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I have one. I live in Chicago and fat bikes are great in winter. I run the tires at ~7 psi in winter. Fat bikes also work surprisingly well as a trail bike. You can bomb descents on a fat bike even if you're less skilled (like me, for example). Climbing on a fat bike is not as slow as you'd think, the tires look massive but they're mostly air. You also get tremendous grip in really steep stuff. Overall, fat bikes are probably not as good at level trail and climbing as a regular mountain bike but they are superior in winter and a bit easier to ride in technical stuff. They are also a blast to eff around on.
 

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Fat bikes are a hoot. You can ride them pretty much anywhere a mountain bike would go, albeit at a slower pace. They are great for the snow and sand...anything that benefits from the extra flotation a wide tire provides. Heck, I have mine set up so that I can take it deer hunting.

Gearing is like a mountain bike, so they climb fine, but they are pretty heavy. My Salsa Mukluk is 35 lbs or so. You can get them down in the 25# range. Most do not have suspension as the tires provide plenty of squish for most applications.

Tires and pressure are big deals. I have 3 sets of tires for different conditions. These can be a significant investment as carbide studded tires for icy conditions can cost $200+ PER TIRE! It is not uncommon to pay $100+ for a standard tire. At 205 lbs I might pump the tires up to 16 psi for roads and hard pack and knock it down to 6 psi for snow.

I have never worked as hard...and gotten passed by more people than when I did this:

Fat Bike Birkie | American Birkebeiner
Great fun and humbling. 30+mph down hill in the snow is a white knuckle affair. :)

If you want to smile on a bike like you did as a kid, get a fatty.
 

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... the Marquette with 27.5 x 3" tires.

3" tire bikes are actually "plus" bikes, not fat bikes. Fat bikes have 4+" tires and I have seen some which have 4.8" tires.

For my purposes, I agree with you that a gravel/adventure bike would be more useful. That will probably be my next purchase.
 

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3" tire bikes are actually "plus" bikes, not fat bikes. Fat bikes have 4+" tires and I have seen some which have 4.8" tires.

For my purposes, I agree with you that a gravel/adventure bike would be more useful. That will probably be my next purchase.
Good to know. I thought 3" wide tires were fat bikes, too. I haven't seen any Fat Bikes on the net with 29 x 4" or 27.5 x 4". All of the Fat Bikes I've seen are 26 x 4"
 

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Good to know. I thought 3" wide tires were fat bikes, too. I haven't seen any Fat Bikes on the net with 29 x 4" or 27.5 x 4". All of the Fat Bikes I've seen are 26 x 4"
2.8-3.0"ish tires are considered "plus" or "mid-fat"
Surly was the first to offer 29" x 2.8 (or was it 3.0") bikes.
Trek jumped in with the revamped Stache last year (29" x 3.0")

Most fat bikes have been 26" x 3.8"-5.0"

Trek was the first to offer a 27.5 x 4" bikes. Others are starting to offer tires for that wheel size.
 

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2.8-3.0"ish tires are considered "plus" or "mid-fat"
Surly was the first to offer 29" x 2.8 (or was it 3.0") bikes.
Trek jumped in with the revamped Stache last year (29" x 3.0")

Most fat bikes have been 26" x 3.8"-5.0"

Trek was the first to offer a 27.5 x 4" bikes. Others are starting to offer tires for that wheel size.
Cool. If I lived further north with greater annual average snowfall rates... I'd be all over the Trek Farley. Looks like a great bike.
 

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They're fun to ride as long as your friends don't find out.
 

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They're fun to ride as long as your friends don't find out.
...those would be the Rapha/Capo wearing friends. The laid back plaid/flannel friends are totally into it.

We have a local Hugh Jass race series. Crazy stuff. One must stop and pound a nail to count your lap. Numbers are issued on a paper plate. Check out how they messed with the field on the start to this race. It's all about fun.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p8Zrh3-9P3Y
 

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They seem to have become a "ghetto thing" around me, and the majority of "fat bikes" are being ridden down sidewalks in "tha hood" and congregating around sketchy bodegas.
 

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I believe they were designed to ride on snow in the woods.

One of the Nordic ski centers in NH allows and even rents fat bikes to use in their trails once a week. One of the rules for riding on the ski trails is you may not have any more than 10 PSI in your tires.
I sure hope they keep the skiers off the trails when they do this. Nothing is more fun than having a bunch of nearly out of control fatty riders bombing a hill that you're skiing up. They can't control where they are going, and you don't have enough speed to maneuver. I've been hit twice by fatty riders while skiing, and one of those collisions cost me a $700 pair of skis, the other a $150 pair of poles.

If you get a fatty, ride it responsibly. Riding on active ski trails IS NOT acting responsibly. Neither is riding through my wife's wildflower garden. But none of these riders were acting irresponsible - just ask them (I did) - they were just having fun.
 

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I love my Farley! It's my off-season ride. Trainer on week nights and fatty on weekends when I can't or can't comfortably road ride any more. In on 4.7" Barbegazis. It'll climb, you just need the toughness to make it so. I did a mile+ in 6" of deep virgin snow/ice at about 4/5% last winter and I was near blowing up. I rode snow shoe tracks, 20" of the ground, that's freaking cool! Trails are good, I like the technical stuff, you can keep the easy single track, I find it boring. I beach ride a lot. Even in road season I'll hit up a beach ride here and there just to go enjoy the ride. I did a long ocean ride near an off-shore storm in the spring that was spectacular! Huge waves and a bunch of surfers looking at me like, WTF? All cool. Snow riding is thing for me more than anything else. I love it. I leave groomed trails alone, and I also XC ski. FYI to fatty folk in the snow, I've gone to 1 psi to get traction in post holed trails and deep snow. It works. There is a freaking ripple in the tire but the bike will take off, it's really amazing. I carry my micro gauge and I recommend the same... I also carry a little pump, but good luck with that, I think it's just more for confidence as it would take like a day to make an impact. Oh, and FYI, if you want to snow ride, Wolf Tooth Poagies. You are welcome.
 

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You can go way more places on a fatty than you ever will on a mountain bike. Swamp, mud, plowed fields - I tried them all and places I used to leave my mountain bike and hike , I can now ride. Trek Farly 9 is what I have and love it.
 
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