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I read on this site a year or so back about an overweight guy who bought himself an indoor trauiner and cycled for hours everyday and got so fit he ultimately became a pro cyclist, have searched and can't find the article - can anyone point me to who this is and a link, I'm sure there was a wikipedia link

Many thx
 

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I belive it. .

WingNut said:
I read on this site a year or so back about an overweight guy who bought himself an indoor trauiner and cycled for hours everyday and got so fit he ultimately became a pro cyclis. . .
One's success in a endurance sports like cycling is 99% genetics. It's sometimes amusing to read some of the post of people structuring their work around riding so they can "train" 15 hours a week to be a CAT 2 or something, when in actuality a genetically gifted person could do it goofing around on his/her bike for maybe 7 hours a week. It reminds me of a guy who used to do some Tuesday/Thursday night hammer sessions, and could hang at the front, yet spent his off time drinking in bars and maybe rode 100 miles a week. It's genetics, and you can't fight it, nor really improve on it.
 

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QQUIKM3 said:
One's success in a endurance sports like cycling is 99% genetics. It's sometimes amusing to read some of the post of people structuring their work around riding so they can "train" 15 hours a week to be a CAT 2 or something, when in actuality a genetically gifted person could do it goofing around on his/her bike for maybe 7 hours a week. It reminds me of a guy who used to do some Tuesday/Thursday night hammer sessions, and could hang at the front, yet spent his off time drinking in bars and maybe rode 100 miles a week. It's genetics, and you can't fight it, nor really improve on it.
I would disagree with you. Over the years I have seen plenty of genetic monsters who never went anywhere because they did not have the desire/ability to train 30 hours a week, travel relentlessly in crappy cars and crappy hotels and live like a monk. I have seen plenty of people willing to put up with it who had long carriers. Bob Mionske is a good example, he had the Vo2 max of pea but still went to the Olympics twice and National Championships. One of my best friends in the world is a genetic freak. former DH ski racer who after only 2 years of riding was racing on 7-11 doing all the European Classic. Two years later he was out of the sport. He just did not want to work so hard to finish 50th.
 

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Everything's relative

bigpinkt said:
Bob Mionske is a good example, he had the Vo2 max of pea but still went to the Olympics twice and National Championships.
No, he didn't. He had great statistics (and VO2 max is not the only number to consider). You're comparing someone with great numbers and then someone with fantastic numbers. Between those two, motivation and training will compensate. The point is that the rest of us have, by comparison, mediocre numbers. There's nothing most of us can do to EVER get to where we can produce 400 watts for an hour while weighing 150 lbs. Of course we can get better than we were when we started cycling - that's a given. But there's a persistent myth that we all could be pros if we had 30 hours a week to train. Not gonna happen. Not now, not never. :)
 

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Kerry Irons said:
No, he didn't. He had great statistics (and VO2 max is not the only number to consider). You're comparing someone with great numbers and then someone with fantastic numbers. Between those two, motivation and training will compensate. The point is that the rest of us have, by comparison, mediocre numbers. There's nothing most of us can do to EVER get to where we can produce 400 watts for an hour while weighing 150 lbs. Of course we can get better than we were when we started cycling - that's a given. But there's a persistent myth that we all could be pros if we had 30 hours a week to train. Not gonna happen. Not now, not never. :)
I have always heard that Bob had a low Vo2 and won races on smarts, perhaps this is another of those cycling myths that are not based on fact.

Perhaps I should rephrase my position as it did not come out correctly and I agree with much of what you are saying. My main point was that success was NOT 99% based on genetics.

If you are 30 years, weigh 250 and have never done a bit of exersize in your life then no matter how how much you train you will likely not be a pro. If you start at 13, have good guidance and support, and work very hard and maintain your focus for 10 years your chances of being a US domestic PRO (Free bike and travel and not much else) is not bad, Your chances of being a PRO in Europe are much less....winning races in Europe?? A fraction of a percent.

In the end what separates the greats is not genetic it is training and focus/obsession.....and a good doctor.
 

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Can't agree

bigpinkt said:
I have always heard that Bob had a low Vo2 and won races on smarts, perhaps this is another of those cycling myths that are not based on fact.

If you start at 13, have good guidance and support, and work very hard and maintain your focus for 10 years your chances of being a US domestic PRO (Free bike and travel and not much else) is not bad, Your chances of being a PRO in Europe are much less....winning races in Europe?? A fraction of a percent.

In the end what separates the greats is not genetic it is training and focus/obsession .....and a good doctor.
Mionski's numbers were good enough, and he was just used as an example that you could race at the top level without the highest VO2 max in the world. His numbers still put the rest of us to shame.

However, I can't agree with your assumption that it is just training. To reach the kind of levels you describe, you need BOTH training and genetics. If you take an "average" 13 year old and train them hard, they are going to be an above average 25 year old but NOT at the top levels of the sport (US domestic professional). They have to have genetics, motivation, good training, resistance to injury and illness, etc. Miss any one of these and they're out of the ball game.
 

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Kerry Irons said:
They have to have genetics, motivation, good training, resistance to injury and illness, etc. Miss any one of these and they're out of the ball game.
And don't forget response to training, recovery, and tolerable training volume all have strong genetic components.
 

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What is the genetic bell curve? I mean, does your average high school varsity athlete have the genetics for it if he would only dedicate himself?

Could Pre have been a sick cyclist, as good as if not better than is running exploits?

How specific is the genetic cut for cycling? I guess I have always felt that hard work will get you your first 85% of cycling fairly fast. But the "great" to "phenom" category will always be mooted by the genetic freak in the bunch. I dunno.
 

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Yes. .

DM.Aelis said:
What is the genetic bell curve? I mean, does your average high school varsity athlete have the genetics for it if he would only dedicate himself?
You're born genetically imprinted already, and this kind of gets back to someones earlier comment about "desire" to train, travel and all that crap, but it's useless with out the genetic factor on ones side. It's funny to hear anger by some as it's reality, and I guess sometimes it bites.
 

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asgelle said:
So my 40 km TT times have been going down because my genes have been changing? I guess that's possible if you want to admit training causes genetic mutations.
No, I think the point is that folks like whatshisname from Lounge here and Liz Hatch for example, they pick up the bike relatively late, and in just a couple years are Cat 1 / Domestic pro. Meanwhile, you have most of the other racers that have been doing it years and years and they may never reach that level.

Another example, though much more anecdotal, is this guy that comes to our club rides starting every June or so, with little to no miles cycled since the previous summer, and he ends up riding with the A group on the weekly hammerfests. Sure, he's not going to win a Cat 1 race (because he doesn't train or race at all), however naturally fast enough hang in the weekly hammer rides.

One more, just to toot my own horn a bit. I ride with a guy from work on about 80% of my rides the last two years. In spite of the fact that I'm 7 years older and 70 pounds heavier, I drop him on every long hill or series of hard rollers, with virtually the same training on the same routes. It happens so often and so regularly, how can anything other than genetics explain it?
 

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Some people just are born excelling in a particular thing.

But they had to start somewhere - at some point in his life Eddie Van Halen was a rank
beginner at guitar, but look what obsession brought.

I'm sure at one point Lance Armstrong was a rank beginner bike rider too.
 
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