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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
greetings

I clipped the rear wheel of a rider in front at ~22mph on a flat road and went down, relatively hard. Lucky I am just bruised and my clothes are torn. The guy behind me tripped over (or hit?) my Madone (not sure how hard) and flew over me. The 2005 Madone 5.9 is in the LBS getting a full safety check and straightening out ultegra brifters, etc. I know with carbon frame and forks is hard to tell if I should be buying a new one or take my chances. There are some shallow scratches on the paintwork of tubes and forks. What do you all think?

What is the likelyhood of frame and fork invisible but eventually terminal damage, in percentage terms? low? high? medium? Also the Deda Newton (aluminium) bars and Thomson alloy X4 stem? The brifters were twisted inwards but the bar tape does not show tear/scratch damage.The rear derailleur is also deeply scratched but otherwise seems to be working - could this mean chain-stays or seat-stays are possibly cracked/damaged?

thanks, stay upright all.
 

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I'd send it to Trek for a full inspection. My friend crashed his Madone and put a crack in his top tube. They replaced and repainted the tube. I think it cost a few hundred, but it's better to be on the safe side.
 

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Sorry about the accident... hope you are back to 100% soon. Once your LBS is done with the inspection, if either one has any reservations about the frame being damaged, I'm sure sending it back to the manufacturer could settle the question. It would probably cost something, but that is bound to be cheaper than just buying a new one. Also, if the manufacturer did say the frame was done, they would probably give you some type of deal on a replacement.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
LBS said "all clear"

thank you everyone who replied.

My LBS carried out service on the bike and also did safety check on all components after I explained what happened. They said I have nothing to worry about. I sure hope they are right!

Stay Upright.
 

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acid_rider said:
thank you everyone who replied.

My LBS carried out service on the bike and also did safety check on all components after I explained what happened. They said I have nothing to worry about. I sure hope they are right!

Stay Upright.
Do your own inspection on the fork. Use a magnifying glass, and look around the fork tips. Any hint of cracking, even in the clear coat, sheet-can the fork. Be doubley suspicious of the fork if you destroyed your front wheel. A teammate raced on his bike after previously been taken down, and when he tried to avoid the next impending crash (two weeks later) by braking and turning sharply, his fork snapped.
I would gladly pay $300 for a new fork rather than hitting the deck again and (having to replace even more damaged equipment.)
Last year I chucked a 3 week old Easton full carbon fork, for exactly that reason.
 

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In this case the question is, do you trust your LBS as having made an adequate inspection? When it gets down to the mechanics of it, careful inspection will find flaws that can lead to a failure. Unlike metals inspection techniques are different. Consider that flight mechanics inspect carbon fiber parts on airplanes all the time. Ever see a movie of a modern naval jet landing on an aircraft carrier? Those new planes have a lot of carbon fiber parts in them, by the way. Look at the beating they take routinely.

Sounds like your body took the brunt of the shock anyway. Inpsection is prudent, and as you did not say you trashed a wheel then I would not think the fork got hurt at all. There are crashes where you get a feeling right away that something got broken on the bike, or yourself. Many crashes at speed are falling and sliding and only impart forces on the bike well within it's design specifications.

Bottom line, if you look carefully at your frame and fork, any damage is noticeable by eye. There is also the penny test; wrapping on the tube with a penny should make a characteristic sound. Near a true crack, the sound change is obvious.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
thanks you all, more info

both wheels were still true after the crash according to my LBS. Both front and rear brakes were a bit twisted on the sides rubbing the pads on rims but I just set them straight with my hands. I will do the penny test and a visual too.
 
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