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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, I've narrowed my search between these two bikes. Both are about the same price, however, the Felt comes with Dura Ace and Cervelo is Ultegra. Both are Alum. but the Felt has carbon seat stays. Am I comparing apples to oranges? I know I should ride each, but what LBS will let me do that? HELP!
 

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Not all bikes fit all riders the same way. One of the two bikes may fit you better. The more comfortable, for you, of the two will be the fastest.

A bike shop should let you test ride a bike. I am not talking a parking lot tour either. Try to get a half hour in the saddle to see how it really feels.
 

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I really liked my felt F55, I got one in 2006(?) and I rode the crap out of it. It held up well and was plenty stiff though the fork and seatpost were extremly heavy relative to the other components. Even when I upgraded to a cannondale I sold it for the felt again. if you are going to be racing I would go for the felt, you will see so much Dura Ace at the races that, if you are anything like me, will make you feel you have to get DA. I personally like the soloists and the aero advantage sounds good on paper (please nobody get upset here) but I dont know how noticable they will be over another bike.
All that said, the one that you like blindly while riding will be the best one. If your shop doesnt let you take them out on a ride with proper apparel then I would recommend going to another shop, it is protocol to take a bike out and really test ride it.
 

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I've got the Solist and love it. I believe the aero advantage is real (but maybe it's all in my head) and that you can feel it when riding alone into headwinds, or the speed gets above 20MPH. It's stiff, but that's how it's built. With 25c tires and a good saddle I can ride until my legs give out, not my buttocks.

I've never ridden the Felt so I can only compare my apple to itself. As others have said, test ride both if possible. If you can't, then test ride one, and if you like it, buy it. There's no reason you shouldn't be able to test ride a bike if you leave an I.D.

As for the Dura Ace/Ultegra question- all Shimano groups are good- ALL of them, including Sora. They're precise. They're fast. They last forever. My 1977 Japanese Schwinn has a low grade Shimano groupo on it. Aside from adjustments I've never had any problems- I've never even changed the cables on it. I put more than 7000 miles on a Sora equipped bike that only hiccuped if cross chained (and that's on a triple) or you tried to downshift after you already bogged. I'm sure Dura Ace is great, but for all practical purposes it's jewelry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
A New Wriinkle

Thanks for the great posts, I guess a test ride on either is best. But, a coworker pointed me to a website that is selling a Ridley Excalibur with SRAM Rival for even cheaper than the Felt or Cervelo. Best part, full carbon frame!

Anybody with experience with SRAM?:mad2:
 

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Sram is not shimano in a bad way from my experiences. I think that shimano just works much better than sram road stuff does.
I would still stick to the LBS for the purchase. These bikes are expensive and once you get a bike there will likely be adjustements to be made so that you get the most from your money. A shop you purchase from will be more apt to help you with these adjustments than if you show up with a bike purchased online. It may be hard to justify the cost difference initially but from my experiences the extra coin will pay off.
 

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I second SeaHouston's answer. From my experience with SRAM, it seems to take more effort to shift- especially the left shifter- which shifts the front derailleur. Maybe I'm just used to STI, but there's no doubt that there's more effort in shifting with the SRAM. Many will argue that it is an acquired thing and the SRAM force group is lighter than even Dura-Ace. Still, it took me 5 minutes to get used to Shimano and I never really felt comfortable with the shifting on the SRAM after 30 minutes. The system shifted smooth, accurate and lightning fast but the shifters need to change the way they shift IMHO.
 
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