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Seems as though the Italian courts thought that indeed Simeoni was a liar after all. Maybe Armstrong knew something they didn't. Michele Ferrari cleared of all sporting fraud charges in Italian courts.

From cyclingnews.com:

Michele Ferrari absolved of all charges by Italian appeals court

By Tim Maloney, European Editor

In a decision earlier this week, an Italian Court of Appeal in Bologna absolved Dr. Michele Ferrari of the sporting fraud charges related to accusations by Filippo Simeoni, as well as charges of abusing his medical license to write prescriptions "because the facts do not exist" to support these charges.

Ferrari was the preparatore for many top cyclists, most notably Lance Armstrong. On October 1, 2004, Ferrari was convicted of sporting fraud and abusing his medical license to write prescriptions and sentenced by Judge Maurizio Passarini to suspend his medical license for one year and a fine of €900. One of Ferrari's main accusers was Simeoni, who Ferrari worked with from late 1996 to late 1997, claimed that Ferrari had given him erythropoietin (epo) and Andriol (synthetic testosterone). But the appeals court found that Simeoni's accusations against Ferrari had no basis in fact and threw out Passarini's judgement.

After the successful appeal, Ferrari's attorney Dario Bolognesi said, "We're satisfied with this verdict, but we are still awaiting the full text of the court's decision that will shed light on why they overturned the original decision, because we have requested that the previous decision is removed from Doctor Ferrari's record. And we may also sue for damages."
 

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magnolialover said:
Seems as though the Italian courts thought that indeed Simeoni was a liar after all. Maybe Armstrong knew something they didn't. Michele Ferrari cleared of all sporting fraud charges in Italian courts.

From cyclingnews.com:

Michele Ferrari absolved of all charges by Italian appeals court

By Tim Maloney, European Editor

In a decision earlier this week, an Italian Court of Appeal in Bologna absolved Dr. Michele Ferrari of the sporting fraud charges related to accusations by Filippo Simeoni, as well as charges of abusing his medical license to write prescriptions "because the facts do not exist" to support these charges.

Ferrari was the preparatore for many top cyclists, most notably Lance Armstrong. On October 1, 2004, Ferrari was convicted of sporting fraud and abusing his medical license to write prescriptions and sentenced by Judge Maurizio Passarini to suspend his medical license for one year and a fine of €900. One of Ferrari's main accusers was Simeoni, who Ferrari worked with from late 1996 to late 1997, claimed that Ferrari had given him erythropoietin (epo) and Andriol (synthetic testosterone). But the appeals court found that Simeoni's accusations against Ferrari had no basis in fact and threw out Passarini's judgement.

After the successful appeal, Ferrari's attorney Dario Bolognesi said, "We're satisfied with this verdict, but we are still awaiting the full text of the court's decision that will shed light on why they overturned the original decision, because we have requested that the previous decision is removed from Doctor Ferrari's record. And we may also sue for damages."

Doesn't matter. Damage is done. Most fans will think Ferrari is dirty anyways. And Armstrong by association. We tend to trust sensational stories, and pay little or no attention to retractions. You are guilty until proven innocent, but even then you are guilty.
 

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They may have decided that the evidence was not legally strong enough to uphold the conviction. But that isn't the same as being totally exonerated. Only if they strike all record of it will it be a total clearing.

It's the same as if a thief was convicted of a crime on evidence from one person only with no other witnesses. He may very well have committed the crime but the evidence is not strong enough to nail him. The judge, police & victim all know he did it, but they have to let him go.
 

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ultimobici said:
They may have decided that the evidence was not legally strong enough to uphold the conviction. But that isn't the same as being totally exonerated. Only if they strike all record of it will it be a total clearing.

It's the same as if a thief was convicted of a crime on evidence from one person only with no other witnesses. He may very well have committed the crime but the evidence is not strong enough to nail him. The judge, police & victim all know he did it, but they have to let him go.
Hmm.... so there's no evidence to convict, then how does judge and everyone know "he did it"? They just don't like the guy? Gut feeling? Yeah, police are NEVER wrong with their hunches. There's no way they would try to nail some innocent guy - they have way more integrity than that. If they even take you for questioning, this pretty much means you did it. (sarcasm)

I say we should go back to throwing people in the river to see if they float. I they do, that means they are a witch, and my original "gut feeling" is correct.
 

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magnolialover said:
Seems as though the Italian courts thought that indeed Simeoni was a liar after all.
Is that really an accurate assessment? Maybe there just wasn't enough hard evidence to convict?
Or maybe they did believe Simeoni.

What some Italian guy posted on RBR makes it sound like he got off on technicalities. Namely that the charges of acting as an unlicensed pharmacist weren't supported because he didn't prescribe or dispense to the public but to select individuals sporadically (does this mean they have evidence he gave prescriptions for PERs and/or actually drugs to cyclists?)

And then that the other accussations against him (telling riders how to take EPO, etc.) do not amount to sporting fraud.
 

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55x11 said:
Hmm.... so there's no evidence to convict, then how does judge and everyone know "he did it"? They just don't like the guy? Gut feeling? Yeah, police are NEVER wrong with their hunches. There's no way they would try to nail some innocent guy - they have way more integrity than that. If they even take you for questioning, this pretty much means you did it. (sarcasm)

I say we should go back to throwing people in the river to see if they float. I they do, that means they are a witch, and my original "gut feeling" is correct.
They could only nail Al Capone for income tax evasion, now you would be insanely naive to maintain that's the only thing he was guilty of. I know there's an ocean between the two in every sense, but a lack of conviction isn't necessarily the same as being innocent. Now burn the witch and his cycling texan crony! ;)
 
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Armstrong rocks...er, rolls

You go Lance, if you were French, the European press would be demanding you be King.
But, an American in Paris (who has conquered Moulin Rouge seven times in a row)...you may listen to the Dixie Chickens; but, that's ok. To each his own. You've worked harder for everything you have. Enjoy! Ride on.
 

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Museum of Zero Tolerance said:
You go Lance, if you were French, the European press would be demanding you be King.
But, an American in Paris (who has conquered Moulin Rouge seven times in a row)...you may listen to the Dixie Chickens; but, that's ok. To each his own. You've worked harder for everything you have. Enjoy! Ride on.
Don't be silly, we don't give a rat's arse about kings. Especially the French, you know, guillotine and all that Terror they had going on. More or less inspired by the USA of course, but you don't want to say that out loud to L'Equipe. :rolleyes:
 

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rogger said:
Don't be silly, we don't give a rat's arse about kings. Especially the French, you know, guillotine and all that Terror they had going on. More or less inspired by the USA of course, but you don't want to say that out loud to L'Equipe. :rolleyes:
Hate to be an asshat, but I just finished writing a 40 page paper on the French Revolution.
Rev:1789-99. Guilottine perfected circa 1791. (1793? Eh the Phyrigian caps were 91, It's one of the two for the guillotine).
I think the French like kings. 1800 on: Napoleon.
They went from a moron with a bad administration to a friggin dictator. :p
(Well, not intentionally... but...)
-estone2
 

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estone2 said:
Hate to be an asshat, but I just finished writing a 40 page paper on the French Revolution.
Rev:1789-99. Guilottine perfected circa 1791. (1793? Eh the Phyrigian caps were 91, It's one of the two for the guillotine).
I think the French like kings. 1800 on: Napoleon.
They went from a moron with a bad administration to a friggin dictator. :p
(Well, not intentionally... but...)
-estone2
Yeah well, they like to call it republics, they're down to the sixth or something like that? :idea:
 

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The cyclingnews story is misleading--to say the least. The conviction was set aside because the time between charges being brought and the occurence of the offense exceeded the limitation period. In the U.S. legal system this would be called the statute of limitations. He got off on a technicality.
 

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Museum of Zero Tolerance said:
You've worked harder for everything you have. Enjoy! Ride on.
If "worked harder" is some kind of euphemism for "doped" then I guess you're right.
 

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AJL said:
From all I've read, he did work his ass off, doesn't mean he didn't dope - but he was a hard worker in any case.
I just get tired of all this crap about how LA won because he worked harder, trained smarter, so and so wasted their talent, the europeans are lazy, etc.
 
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