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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So, I am brand new to road bikes, but I have been around bikes my whole life, and am very mechanicly inclined. I am looking to purchase a road bike for comuting to and from work. I do not want to spend very much money, and I found a co-worker that has an 84-86 Peugeot that has not seen the light of day for atleast 15 years. It needs some maintance, and updates, and I think I can get it for a good price. Does $150 sound good? It is going to need atleast tires, tubes, pedals, seat, and handlebar wrap. It could also use all new cables.

One of my questions/concerns is the seat tube. It does not have a seat clamp, and there is just an allen bolt in the top of the seat post. I assume this means I cannot change out the seat post. Is there some way to retrofit a modern style seat post and clamp?

Second question- It is currently a 10 speed. If I were to install updated cassette, derailler, and shifters(would I even need shifters) could I convert it to a 12 speed or more? Are the wheel spacings the same for the different gear choices?

Is there anything that I should watch out for?

Thanks very much in advance, Jarrod
 

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$150 seems a little high to me, but I haven't paid much attention to used Peugeots lately, so I could be wrong.
You'll likely have to put tires and tubes on any bike that age, so that's not a knock. Tubes are four to six dollars, tires from $12 to $50 or so. If they're 27-inch instead of 700c, you'd have a much more limited selection, but they're readily available.
Cables are cheap and easy, You could probably just pull the old ones out, grease and replace, but we're only talking five or six dollars, so you might as well replace them.
Pedal and seat costs vary hugely. Many bike shops have a box of take-off seats; around here you can take your pick for $5-$10. If you're picky or plan to ride a lot, you could spend $100. Same with pedals. My singlespeed has BMX pedals I got for $8 off a clearance table, but you can spend a couple of hundred for clipless (there's no reason to, IMO, but you can...).
Bar wrap is a non-issue. Bike shops have miles of it, and it's impossible to screw up. If you get it wrong, just unwrap it and start over. Many people change it several times a season, just to be doing something to the bike or to get a new look.
Seat post swap is easy. You need to know the diameter of the old one (probably stamped on the post; if not, a shop can measure it for you), then you just give the guy money and he gives you a new post. You can often find them really cheap, less than $10, and I've never had trouble with those even though I weigh 240. Typical name-brand price might be $40.
"Upgrading" the cassette is iffy, depending on the rear spacing (later bikes have more space between the "dropouts," the things the rear axle slides into) than earlier ones. I don't remember the old measurements (maybe 120 or 126mm). Newer ones are 130mm. I also can't remember when cassettes replaced freewheels, but that may be an issue, too--you can't put a cassette gear cluster on a hub made for freewheels. It's possible to spread the dropouts and force a new wheel in there, and if you're willing to shift in friction mode (no clicking or indexing), that will work. Otherwise it's harder, but not impossible (also not worth the trouble, at least to me. I rode for 20 years on a 10-speed and didn't know I needed more gears).
Finally, another thing I don't remember: Peugeot is a French manufacturer, and almost nothing on the real French-made Peugeots was interchangeable with any other bike in the world. Most bikes' stems, for instance, were 22.2mm in diameter (called "1-inch," but really smaller) while French bikes used 22.0mm--just enough to make it not work. Bottom brackets were different, too. I think they'd moved the factories to Taiwan and changed to common English (and Japanese) standards by the time that bike was made, but I'm not sure. If not, you'll play hell getting French sizes.
 

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Whether it's a good price depends on the model as well as the condition. Peugeot made a range of models, and that might be a good price for a higher-end one, but very high if it was one of the cheapest. So you might want to ask for some more specifics.

Re upgrading the gears, unless it's really a nice frame it's almost certainly a bad idea economically. You'd likely spend more than the bike is worth. Certainly not worth it for a couple extra gear combinations.

When you say it doesn't have a seat clamp, are you referring to the binder bolt that secures the seatpost in the frame on modern systems, or do you mean a separate clamp? Every bike has some way to clamp the saddle rails to the seatpost, so there has to be a clamp of some kind, and most have the clamp integrated with the post, so that may be what you're looking at. Saddle rail dimensions haven't changed much, so even older-style seatposts and clamps can usually be adapted to modern saddles. So there's probably no reason to get a new seatpost, even if you want a new saddle.

I'd suggest you find out more about the model of bike and its components, post those here to help you negotiate an appropriate price, and then if you buy it, start by doing the minimum to make the bike rideable: a saddle you like, pedals in a style you like, new bar tape (to make it look prettier and newer), tires/tubes, and lube and adjust everything. Cables (at least the inner wires) are probably a good idea. New brake pads (good ones like Koolstop are a very cheap upgrade) will make it safer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
So, I got the price down to $75. The bike is an 86, PGN10. It has still been sitting in my car, so I have not even started cleaning it up. Some things I have noticed, or learned since I have had it are very interesting.

First off, there is definatly no seat post binder, or clamp of any sort. The seatpost adjustment is all done from an allen head bolt on the top of the seatpost. Turning it moves the post up and down. It gives a great, clean look to the frame, as there is no quick release, or binder bolt to see.

Secondly, the bike has some proprietary rear hub, with abnormal spline shape, and count, so inorder to change the freewheel, i would need to replace the rear hub. I will probable not do this , as it would not benifit anything, and would double the cost of the bike.

I think I am going to put on some crank brothers pedals, as that is what I currently have on my mtb, and I love them, so I will stay with them. Also, I would like to be able to use the same shoes that I have, so I could atleast walk into a store without sounding like a tap dancer.

I would like to change the brake levers, as I do not care for the cables exiting out of the top of the levers. Would it be possible to install later model brake levers, that have internal cable routing? Would I have any problems with diferent handlebar sizes? Thanks for all your help, I cannot wait to start riding this bike, It looks like its going to be very fun.
 

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jarrod7219 said:
So, I got the price down to $75. The bike is an 86, PGN10. It has still been sitting in my car, so I have not even started cleaning it up. Some things I have noticed, or learned since I have had it are very interesting.

First off, there is definatly no seat post binder, or clamp of any sort. The seatpost adjustment is all done from an allen head bolt on the top of the seatpost. Turning it moves the post up and down. It gives a great, clean look to the frame, as there is no quick release, or binder bolt to see.

Secondly, the bike has some proprietary rear hub, with abnormal spline shape, and count, so inorder to change the freewheel, i would need to replace the rear hub. I will probable not do this , as it would not benifit anything, and would double the cost of the bike.

I think I am going to put on some crank brothers pedals, as that is what I currently have on my mtb, and I love them, so I will stay with them. Also, I would like to be able to use the same shoes that I have, so I could atleast walk into a store without sounding like a tap dancer.

I would like to change the brake levers, as I do not care for the cables exiting out of the top of the levers. Would it be possible to install later model brake levers, that have internal cable routing? Would I have any problems with diferent handlebar sizes? Thanks for all your help, I cannot wait to start riding this bike, It looks like its going to be very fun.
You're still mixing up the seatpost terminology a little. There's a "clamp" -- that's what attaches the saddle to the post. So you can change saddles, if you want

The hub is probably just a freewheel hub, standard at that time. With the proper splined tool, you can thread off the freewheel, and thread on a new one. There may be no reason to change it, but if it's worn, replacements with various cog combinations are still available, and not expensive. And you could replace the 5-speed with a 6-speed if you want. Every shop has the tools for freewheel removal, so if you don't want to buy the tool you can pay somebody to remove the old freewheel (it can be kind of hard when it's been on for years).

You can get levers. Google "aero brake levers" -- that's what they called the ones with the along-the-bar cable routing. The band clamps on the levers accommodate a range of bar sizes, so that's no problem. Tektro levers are affordable ($30 or so?) and work fine.

Give it a good look, and lube things. You might need a new chain, and it wouldn't be a bad idea to replace the cables (you'll need to replace the brake cables if you get new levers, anyway).

Have fun. If it fits you, it'll be a good bike.
 

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I don't understand about the rear hub. The freewheel should just unscrew, I'm thinking maybe the splines you're talking about is the place where you insert the freewheel removal tool. There were a couple of different tools in use at that time, Regina and Suntour were the most popular. If you can latch on the the correct tool it should come right off (with a little effort). The easiest way is to remove the wheel, put the freewheel tool in a vice, set the wheel on top and use the leverage provided by the wheel as leverage. When you reinstall it, or install a new one, make sure all the threads are clean, then grease both the hub and freewheel threads liberally before screwing it on.
 

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I stand corrected

jarrod7219 said:
So, here is a picture of the type of freewheel on my bike.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/kstoerz/3077239830/in/photostream/

Not that it makes any difference, but now you know what I am talking about. I will post pics of my bike later today.
Forgot about the infamous, and now quite rare, Helicomatic. Not much you can do with that. Lube it and hope it works for a while.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Here is a picture of the seat tube/top tube/seat stay junction. You can see that there is clearly no seat post binder. I never did have a question about the seat attachment to the seat post, rather the seat post to seat tube connection. I do very much like the cleanliness of the connection without a seat post binder.

 

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Pump point

jarrod7219 said:
Here is a picture of the seat tube/top tube/seat stay junction. You can see that there is clearly no seat post binder. I never did have a question about the seat attachment to the seat post, rather the seat post to seat tube connection. I do very much like the cleanliness of the connection without a seat post binder.
You have an orphan system, so hope it is not corroded or frozen.

BTW, you have the pump head upside down. It should be angled into the angle formed by the seat tube and the top tube.
 

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Whew! I've never seen a rear hub like that. I think if it were me, I'd be looking for a new hub & relacing the rear wheel.
 
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