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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After mountain biking for three years (and loving every minute of it), and constant peer pressure from the guys I work with, I finally bought a road bike yesterday - a 2006 Giant OCR1. After being fitted, picking up the other gear I needed (and wanted), I hit the road with a friend and put in 18 miles through beautiful central Kentucky horse country. I really enjoyed it. It's nice to be able to ride while the trails are drying out!

One thing about the bike that I noticed, which was mentioned in almost every review I read, was that the brakes are terrible. Taking advantage of the 10% off accessories when I purchased the bike, I bought a set of Shimano 105 brakes to replace the no-names that came with the bike. The 105's were recommended by folks here as well as the people at the bike shop. Hopefully they will be in within a week. I also picked up Look KEO Classic pedals, Sidi Raiden road shoes (which are as comfortable as slippers IMO), a Sigma BC 906 bike computer (which is pretty nice), and a pair of Continental Ultra Gatorskins (wire bead) to replace the Krappy Kenda's that come with the bike. I think it's a pretty good setup, just needs some fine tuning.

One question. Considering my 175lbs riding weight, what should my tire pressure be set to? From what I can tell from reading through old threads and some other information I found on the Internet, it looks like something between 100psi and 110psi on both ends should be good. Is that correct?
 

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I weight 145 lbs and run 110-120 psi. It's a personal preference. Lower pressure will give a slightly better ride and have a bit more rolling resistance. If you tend to hit things on the road (like sharp pavement transitions), then a little higher pressure will help prevent pinch flats. I try to hop over stuff like that, or at least get my weight off the saddle to let the bike move.
 

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Tire pressure is typically determined by the rim/tire combination. The hooked edge which secures the tire to the rim can only withstand so much pressure before it fails. I typically recommend that people run whatever the maximum pressure is for the tire - usually ends up being around 120 psi. If you start running lower air pressure, pinch flats can occur. This is especially a problm on narrow tires (23mm vs 35mm).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
gmcastil said:
Tire pressure is typically determined by the rim/tire combination. The hooked edge which secures the tire to the rim can only withstand so much pressure before it fails. I typically recommend that people run whatever the maximum pressure is for the tire - usually ends up being around 120 psi. If you start running lower air pressure, pinch flats can occur. This is especially a problm on narrow tires (23mm vs 35mm).
Interesting. I know max PSI listed on the side of the tire is 125, so I'll probably end up giving 120 a try. The tires are 23mm, FYI. Thanks for the information! I do appreciate the response(s).
 

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if u hear a big boom when u r pumping up your tire, well u added to much. i go with 100-110 on my michelin pro race 2 tires and have mavic and bontrager wheelsets. like others said to low and pinch flat. welcome to the roadie life. now time to shave those legs
 
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