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waterproof*
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I've been a fan of satellite spotting, and have subscribed to NASA's service that alert when the ISS will be visible, but last night it was clear and warm here in Tejas so I was out at the park, doing some calisthenics on the equipment, happened to look up and notice a satellite overhead. Polar orbit, north to south.

Then it blinked out. I thought, hmm, that's odd, the earth's shadow is way more east than that. So I kept looking and a few seconds later it blinked back on again. Kept watching it all the way to the horizon, slowing blinking off and on.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Satellite_flare
 

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I have an Android app named "ISS On Live", which shows the location of the ISS and also includes a live video feed looking down at Earth.
 

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Neat. I like satellite watching too, and have seen the ISS many times. Back in shuttle days I once saw ISS and a shuttle a few degrees apart just after undocking. That was cool.

I've seen tumbling satellites wink on and off before, but I wasn't aware of the Iridium phenomenon until your post. Apparently those satellites have 3 large shiny antennas that make the phenomenon more dramatic than with most satellites, and since there are so many of them (more than 60), it' seen pretty frequently.

The first satellite I ever recall seeing was Echo I, a test of the concept of a passive communications satellite that would simply reflect radio waves beamed at it. It was a 100-foot metallized mylar balloon, very reflective in visible wavelengths as well as radio. It was probably comparable in brightness to the ISS, being a little smaller but a lot shinier.

It was launched in 1960. I'm old.
 

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Frog Whisperer
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Neat. I like satellite watching too, and have seen the ISS many times. Back in shuttle days I once saw ISS and a shuttle a few degrees apart just after undocking. That was cool.

I've seen tumbling satellites wink on and off before, but I wasn't aware of the Iridium phenomenon until your post. Apparently those satellites have 3 large shiny antennas that make the phenomenon more dramatic than with most satellites, and since there are so many of them (more than 60), it' seen pretty frequently.

The first satellite I ever recall seeing was Echo I, a test of the concept of a passive communications satellite that would simply reflect radio waves beamed at it. It was a 100-foot metallized mylar balloon, very reflective in visible wavelengths as well as radio. It was probably comparable in brightness to the ISS, being a little smaller but a lot shinier.

It was launched in 1960. I'm old.
I remember seeing Echo too
 
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