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Have good, get give
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The BP was pretty wild on occasion. This was caused primarily because they gave slower riders either shorter routes or "headstarts" on both days so when the merge hit you were coming on riders 5-10mph slower than you.

At least you didn't have a half lane of cones for 5 miles.

Thought about doing the double, but that route just didn't get me going.

That and taking off two full weekends from the house has a way of getting the wife sort of anti-cycling.
 

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Cat 6
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24601 said:
This weekend was my first big charity ride, the MS150 in Dallas. I had a good time and road much better than I expected. The first day was 78.5 miles and I averaged not quite 19mph. I ended up skipping several rest stops just because I got tired of stopping and just wanted to finish.

I had a great weekend, until 5 miles to gothe second day (the 2nd day was 85 miles). One of those handbikes was in the middle of the lane. They are slow (I assume he took the short 40 mile route for day 2) and always in the middle. I tried to go around him, but my rear tire caught a crack in the pavement. I went down going about 20, slid for a while. My left side is pretty beat up. My elbow is swollen, my palm bruised (specialized gel gloves stayed intact and may have saved my hand). Road rash all down my leg. I hurt.

When I finally got up (thanks to all the riders that stopped), I took a look at the bike. It is scratched, a few parts may need replaced, but after putting the chain on it was rideable. I refused sag and went in to finish. I had tears in my eyes, as I crossed the end, both from pain and seeing my wife and 2 kids for the first time in 3 days.

If it had just been the MS158 instead of 163, I would have been nothing but a positive report, but right now I really hurt. I saw several wrecks and near missed from those handbikes and low recumbents. I am not so sure they really need to be out there, aspecially since all of them ride right down the middle and don't seem real interested in moving.

Oh, and to the drunk guy outside his house when I went down, I appreciate the offer, but do not try to pick me up by the elbow I am holding in pain. No means no in both our languages. Also, after the first pleading no, don't try again. It really did hurt and that wasn't the best place to grab me.

Can't wait for next year. :thumbsup:
nothing broken, bike is ok...the pain will subside and when it does you'll feel great for finishing.
 

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Windrider (Stubborn)
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Sorry you got hurt......

24601 said:
I saw several wrecks and near missed from those handbikes and low recumbents. I am not so sure they really need to be out there, aspecially since all of them ride right down the middle and don't seem real interested in moving.

:
glad it was just rash (Skin grows back, bones don't!).

I have to say though, rereading your post, the accident seems to have been a result of your own bike handling.

First of all, MS 150's are always a mix of both experienced and inexperienced riders. It is your responsibility to be able to control your bike. Doing 20MPH knowing that there are slower riders on the course was one error......error 2 was not paying enough attention to avoid a crack in the road.....error 3 was not having enough bike handling experience to be able to either avoid or recover when you hit the crack. If you can't handle the speed, you shouldn't do it. So the Hand cycle rider may have made one mistake, but you made at least 3 from your description

As to your comment about hand cycles and recumbents.....they have as much right to be on that ride as you do.

I have been riding charity events for 25 years and the one consistent thing I see are riders riding way too fast for their experience level, and then complaining about slower riders. I see these "fast" riders causing way more accidents than the slower riders.

Soory you got hurt, I hope it doesn't happen again.

Len
 

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You're Not the Boss of Me
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I gotta agree with Len.

Charity rides are always a bit crazy, and the MS150 can be one of the wildest. It involves all abilities, ages, bike types. I've done 4 MS150s and 10 Courage Classics (both multi-day charity rides) in addition to the usual round of organized events. They are not the best place to worry about your average pace, etc. Tight packs, squirrely riders, etc. are par for the course and require both patience, attention, and skill.

I love charity rides despite those sometimes maddening moments, because they are quintessentially joyful things where everyone's out there for a good cause and a good time. I think you might want to engage in a little self-reflection in suggesting that hand-bikes (essentially, disabled riders) don't belong on a charity ride. I think if you adjust your mindset a bit, you'll have even more fun.

Heal quickly and peace. Hope you keep supporting the MS150 (my Mom was diagnosed 15 years ago and it was a big factor in increasing my committment to philanthropic cycling).
 

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RoadBikeReview's Member
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Len J said:
First of all, MS 150's are always a mix of both experienced and inexperienced riders. It is your responsibility to be able to control your bike. Doing 20MPH knowing that there are slower riders on the course was one error......error 2 was not paying enough attention to avoid a crack in the road.....error 3 was not having enough bike handling experience to be able to either avoid or recover when you hit the crack. If you can't handle the speed, you shouldn't do it. So the Hand cycle rider may have made one mistake, but you made at least 3 from your description
however, if you hit a crack that's approximately parallel to your path, it can be really nasty, regardless of riding ability... they tend to suck you down, for reasons unknown to me.
 

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I had a similar accident in the BP MS 150 a few weeks back about half a mile from the finish where a lesser experienced rider up front was waving to some spectators but couldn't keep their line so they clipped another rider's wheel and that ended up taking a few others including myself down.

I went through a period of despising the rider that couldn't hold their line but then I realized if I was paying attention instead of waving to the crowd then I would ahve been able to avoid the accident instead of becoming part of it so the blame was on me. Luckily my bike wasn't that damaged, the wheels nedded truing, I bent the front derailer & one of the brake levers plus ripped some bar tape so having a bike mechanic friend it only cost me some new bar tape and a couple of beers. I didn't get much road rash but somehow ended up with bruising at the inside of the top of my leg, which is finally healing so I can walk properly now and hopefully get back on the bike in a couple of days.

I think when riding the charity rides you just ahve to go out there with an aim to have fun and be prepared to deal with the masses of riders out there on the course, if you go out there with an aim to get pesonal bests you will just get frustrated and/or involved in accidents.

PS. Those cones were a nightmare especially as some had been bumped over further into the lane, luckily everyone I was riding with was pretty good at caling out obstacles otherwise some of us would ahve went down for sure.
 

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Squirrel Hunter
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Thanks Len

Len J said:
...Doing 20MPH knowing that there are slower riders on the course was one error......error 2 was not paying enough attention to avoid a crack in the road.....error 3 was not having enough bike handling experience to be able to either avoid or recover when you hit the crack...
Thanks Len for writing my response. Error 4 might have been riding too fast while tired and perhaps you should not have skipped a couple of those rest stops. When I have been on a long ride like a century and am getting ready to enter a really congested area at the end, particularly a city with lots of autos I make it a point to stop for a moment, relax and collect my thoughts so I can focus on a safe finish.

As to the hand crank bikes, they often ride in the middle because of the design of roads with a crown to faciliate drainage.

For the OP - hope you heel fast!
 

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I just want to make sure I have the situation right. You were coming up on a slower rider from behind, tried to pass him and crashed, yet somehow it is his fault? Bents and the disabled forced to ride hand bikes shouldn't be banned from charity events. You should.

You may be a nice guy in the real world but you come off as a complete tool on the internet.
 

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Windrider (Stubborn)
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I wasn't trying to.....

24601 said:
My issue is not just the hand bikes, but all of the close to the ground wide types. They are difficult to see and ride the middle and don't move. It seems that the fact that they cause so many issues would at least require some sort of attention. At the least they should be flagged as I saw several people run up on them in packs and not see them until almost too late.

My pace was far from quickest, in fact several people passed me right before the incident. I actually slowed down as I approached him from 23-24. The crack was a fluke and couldn't be seen. When my wheel fell in, there was really nothing that could have been done. I can handle the speed, and your assumption otherwise not knowing me or my style is fairly insulting and rude. The real issue is that there was enough space in the right lane for both of us with still some room to spare if he had just moved over a bit. I tried to go wide just to give him extra room and that is when it happened.

If they are going to be on the ride, they should ride like everyone else. The fact that he was handicapped is meaningless. He doesn't (and neither do the wide low recumbs) have more rights to make everyone have to go wide around him. At one point earlier a low bent was going around 10 up a hill as we were riding the shoulder of a major highway. There was a huge pack of riders trying to get around him, but he was in the middle and weaving. I tried to go around him, called on your left, and just as I got a wheel beside him he swerved over. I called again and he turned around and shrugged his shoulders. I was finally able to catch him move all the way to the left and get past him , but he almost immediately moved back to the middle and trapped the rest of the pack. He was a danger, no question about it. He was forcing people into traffic. If he can't ride tight he shouldn't be there.
be either insulting or rude......I was simply taking what you wrote & writing what it implied from my experience.

The fact that others passed you at higher speeds does not imply that you should be riding at the speed you were.

JTolleson said it better than I could have (obviously from your response)....it seems this is a good thing for you to self-reflect on.

As to your description of a rider that was obviously struggling on a climb......I've been riding for 30+ years and there are climbs that I struggle on......does that mean I shouldn't try them?

I applaud anyone who dedicates their time and effort to both raise the money, train and then do a charity ride. Many (probability the majority) of these riders have never done this distance before.....it is quite an accomplishment for them. I have found that one of the best things about these rides is to slow down and talk to some of the riders and ask them why they are doing the ride and then just listen........some of the stories are amazing and I always feel blessed for having heard them.

Sorry if it came across as insulting, but I would bet I'm closer to the truth than not.

IMO

Len
 

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Len J said:
I applaud anyone who dedicates their time and effort to both raise the money, train and then do a charity ride. Many (probability the majority) of these riders have never done this distance before.....it is quite an accomplishment for them. I have found that one of the best things about these rides is to slow down and talk to some of the riders and ask them why they are doing the ride and then just listen........some of the stories are amazing and I always feel blessed for having heard them.


Len
Perfect Len.......It's a charity ride and not a race...I find it hard to believe someone can find fault with someone doing a charity ride on a hand cycle....
 

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I'm not going to bother taking sides on this one, but I do have a question for anyone out there who may know something about organizing rides like these. Why is it that, seemingly without fail, the "short route folks" get started on their ride on a time table that will cause them to be caught and passed by those doing the longer route? It seems to me that either the people riding the full route should get fired off earlier in the morning or the people doing the short route should get started after the fast riders from the full route group have passed. "Racing" a charity ride has never made sense to me, but it's an inevitability that some will have set out to do just that.It seems to me that it would be more convinient (I refuse to say safer as this group should be able to handle some passing if need be) for the fast experienced guys to not have people in their way. It also seems that it would be safer (there it is) for the short ride folks as they would not have to deal with the people who insist on hanging on for dear life with the fast group before they are ready. 24601, i'm not saying you weren't ready by any means. I'll be the first to admit that I have the fitness (over 8 years of rowing on a very competitive level) but not the bike handling skills (only 2 years on the bike). Especially in my first year of riding, I often found myself hanging on when i probably shouldn't have been, I was lucky not to wreck my own ride or someone elses (knock on wood). Anyway, what's the deal? Why can't organizers get around this issue?
 

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Have good, get give
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meathead said:
I'm not going to bother taking sides on this one, but I do have a question for anyone out there who may know something about organizing rides like these. Why is it that, seemingly without fail, the "short route folks" get started on their ride on a time table that will cause them to be caught and passed by those doing the longer route? It seems to me that either the people riding the full route should get fired off earlier in the morning or the people doing the short route should get started after the fast riders from the full route group have passed. "Racing" a charity ride has never made sense to me, but it's an inevitability that some will have set out to do just that.It seems to me that it would be more convinient (I refuse to say safer as this group should be able to handle some passing if need be) for the fast experienced guys to not have people in their way. It also seems that it would be safer (there it is) for the short ride folks as they would not have to deal with the people who insist on hanging on for dear life with the fast group before they are ready. 24601, i'm not saying you weren't ready by any means. I'll be the first to admit that I have the fitness (over 8 years of rowing on a very competitive level) but not the bike handling skills (only 2 years on the bike). Especially in my first year of riding, I often found myself hanging on when i probably shouldn't have been, I was lucky not to wreck my own ride or someone elses (knock on wood). Anyway, what's the deal? Why can't organizers get around this issue?

Problem with holding starts for the slow people is that you already have people finishing at 6 and 7pm. You hold them till 7:45am to let the long group get the 20mph+ riders out in front and you have people finishing in the dark or in the sag. There isn't a solution except to expect the unexpected.
 

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Inexperienced riders are definitely one of the challenges of the charity rides. But it comes with the territory -- everyone's there for a good time and good cause.

Of course, I avoid these situations by being in the front :)
 

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Shirtcocker
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FrontRanger said:
I just want to make sure I have the situation right. You were coming up on a slower rider from behind, tried to pass him and crashed, yet somehow it is his fault? Bents and the disabled forced to ride hand bikes shouldn't be banned from charity events. You should.

You may be a nice guy in the real world but you come off as a complete tool on the internet.
+1...

// try and do the ride on a handbike sometime and you'll appreciate what those guys do. I've given up water bottles to a few handcyclists when their support wasn't nearby--they work really hard to get where they are going. We should do everything we can to support them.
 

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Windrider (Stubborn)
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It depends on the ride......

what I have seen that causes this are two things:

1.) Rolling starts, where anyone can start anytime between x & Y &
2.) In some events, there is a "celebration" at the end where family and friends are invited to Witness the finishers and then there is a "closing" ceremony. Because of this, the organizers try to have everyone finish at the same time.

Not defending it, but there you are.

Again, these are charity rides not races..........go in with your eyes open, there are every skill level imaginable...be prepared for it. If you "race" it at a high pace you put yourself and everyone else at a greater risk and you miss some of the best parts of the event....the people that do the rides and the reasons they do.

Len
 
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