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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
hi all, first post here. not really a beginner but no expert either. I purchased a villano (not sure what model) a cpl years back off of amazon and have been doing a decent amount of weekend riding with it this year. live in central Illinois currently but am trying to move to Denver and will definitely need to step up on the class of bike when I get out there from what I have seen lol looking at the orbea orca or possibly the avant. have a friend out there and really like her orbea so I'm kinda stuck on that brand. with the hills out there I'm thinking a triple gear crank would be helpful. I don't see any options on the orbea site for those. are they just a aftermarket option you get and put on and are there other things you need to upgrade when you do that? thanks
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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Rather than focus on a triple crankset and pay the cost of the requisite changes to the OE drivetrain, I suggest looking at models with compact cranksets (usually 50/ 34T) and go from there.

Test ride the bikes, preferably in the same environments (terrain) that you'll be riding.

Also, don't forget that along with changes at the front (chainrings) there are several options for rear gearing (cassettes). Any reputable LBS will help you sort this out.
 

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As PJ says, it's not cost effective to buy a bike and then basically replace most of the component group -- we're talking cranks, front derailer and at least one shifter if not both. Compact cranksets have smaller chain rings 50 teeth versus 53 and 34 teeth versus 39. It can make a pretty big difference in gearing, especially if you pair it with a cassette that has big cogs in it, such as 27 teeth, or even higher.

Go ot a bike shop and test ride a few bikes. Most shops carry either Trek, Specialized, Cannondale, or some combination of those manufacturers. Orbea is a little more rare. See if you can locate a dealer that stocks them. Maybe in Chicago.
 

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There's a 99.999% chance you'll be fine with a 50/34 and 11-28 in the back, even in the Colorado Rockies.

Even a 52-36 which newer bikes are all coming with makes for pretty easy climbing, but shop may also swap you to 50/34 if you want in order to sell the bike...
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have noticed the orbeas are not as abundant as some of the other brands, but I kind of like the rarity factor as well lol also I didn't know if the triple crank was a factory option or just a aftermarket upgrade to do. I just want to have the bike ready for whatever I might run into out there when I go. There are definitely some steep and super long hills that youd end up riding eventually. Its pretty flat here for sure
 

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I have noticed the orbeas are not as abundant as some of the other brands, but I kind of like the rarity factor as well lol also I didn't know if the triple crank was a factory option or just a aftermarket upgrade to do. I just want to have the bike ready for whatever I might run into out there when I go. There are definitely some steep and super long hills that youd end up riding eventually. Its pretty flat here for sure
Triples are offered as both factory options as well as aftermarket. Depends on the make/ model, but they're not as popular as the semi-compact or compact cranks.

Your gearing requirements are going to be dictated by fitness and terrain - not much else. So test ride some bikes (preferably where you'll be actually riding) and go from there.

As mentioned, there are options at the rear as well.
 

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Different sized... May come with a 25 or 28 as easiest, but 32 may be available (although this may require derailleur change, others can attest to that better than I).
 

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as far as rear options, does that mean different sized gears or more gears?
Depending on just where you are in the buying process (and your budget), you may have both options.

jetdog9 covered the first (size), but as another example, you may narrow down your choice between two bikes, one a 9 speed, the other, a 10. Both offer different cassette ranges (gearing options).

Just as a FYI, speed designation is based on number of cogs (gears) at the rear.
 

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Different sized... May come with a 25 or 28 as easiest, but 32 may be available (although this may require derailleur change, others can attest to that better than I).
good advice

and you can put a 32T on almost any drivetrain, even Ultegra11/DuraAce11/105 with short cage derailleurs. Just need a different cassette and a couple more links in the chain.

You can put on a 40T rear cassette (eg shimano XT 11 sp) by getting 1/ 11-40 cassettes 2/ Wolf Roadlink derailleur extension 3/ mid cage or long cage derailleur

with a 34 on front and a 40 on the back, you end up with as wide a ratio and just as many gear choices as a 9sp triple.

Triples on road bikes ... are now passe. I did these mods to 32 and 40 on our bikes .. and climbing speed and efficiency only improved. But I mean we have a lot of 15% climbs. ride I did 2 days ag was 40 miles, 3500ft of climbing, and that was not in the real mtns we also have here, just rolling hills. I even used the 40T a couple times, though 32T would have been fine
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
thanks guys, this is the kind of info I was hoping to get. I'm still a ways from getting one yet but its always good to build as much knowledge as possible beforehand
 
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