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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
First off, thanks to those who have assisted me with suggestions or advice in the past.

I'm an ex-runner who can still run but this summer I bought a Trek 2.1 in June and I've logged about 700mi so far. Most rides now are on the weekend between 20-40 miles and my total weekly mileage is under 100. Now that days are getting shorter my outdoor riding will trim to weekends only. I want to maintain or ramp up my training so that next year I can enter a few time trial races or other events, maybe do a century with Team in Training. I'm in central PA so our winters will include periods of cold/wet/ice and unrideable roads. Currently my cardio is pretty good but IMO I could lose another 10-20lb and improve my diet (6'-1", 195lb)

I want to keep working out but before I invest in clothing, trainers, gym memberships, etc I'm soliciting your thoughts on each.
1) Go get lights and winter clothes and ride at night on weekdays and outdoors on weekends when there isn't snow on the ground.
2) Buy a trainer and tapes and do the indoor thing, supplement with calisthenics
3) Get a gym membership, take some spin classes and add strength training.
4) Just do other stuff like run and play hockey and come back to the bike in spring, focus on weight loss.

I do not have cash for all of these options.

Which of these or other ideas are best for novice riders?
 

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It's really just personal preference, whatever you're more comfortable with...however....

1, Yes, riding in winter can be fun but it sounds like you get a bunch of snow.
2. I don't like trainers, they are not very good simulations of riding.
3. Gyms are great, spin classes are okay but not enjoyable like real riding.
4. Doing other stuff, well I always do that anyways. Big deal.

but you forgot to mention

5. Buy a set of rollers which will get you to really feel like you are riding. They will allow you to work on balance, and positioning.

I vote for the numbers 1 and 5.
 

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Bingo!

Hooben said:
5. Buy a set of rollers which will get you to really feel like you are riding. They will allow you to work on balance, and positioning.[/B]
That's it. 'Nuff said. Rollers are by far the best investment for a new rider who wants to keep their legs, heart, lungs, and butt in shape over the winter AND to build some highly valuable skills at the same time.
 

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+1 on rollers. I have a resistance unit and since getting them have not been on a trainer. Get a set of wireless headphones to hook up to the tv and you're all set for winter. The extra little concentration required for the rollers makes the time go by much quicker.
 

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Hooben said:
It's really just personal preference, whatever you're more comfortable with...however....
3. Gyms are great, spin classes are okay but not enjoyable like real riding. .[/B]
Depends on whom else is in the class :blush2:
 

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Roller workout

dgeesaman said:
Interesting recommendation. They're not cheap though.

Do the rollers give a sufficient workout?
Actually you can get rollers pretty cheaply, though if you want them to last forever you have to pay more.

All you have to do to get enough resistance for a hard workout is to let some air out of your tires.
 

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Well, they actually sell tires specifically designed for rollers. You won't ever ride your tires flat, but taking out a few PSI can change your ride quality none the less.
 

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What are your goals for next summer?

If you're riding is to be similar to how it is now I'd pick option #4. Hockey is actually really good for biking but you may as well do training you like because there's no need to make a big sacrifice for the type of riding you do. Unless you're part of the .0001% that doesn't think a sitting on a trainer/rollers sucks I'd focus on general fitness and stuff you like (I'm assuming you'd play hockey because you like it).

Of course if you plan to start racing or have certain time/distance goals for the bike it's a different story.
 

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I'll bet if you look around you'll be able to find a trainer for pretty cheap. (less than 100 bucks) and you can use that to supplement the gym. This was my first season of racing and serious training and I cannot believe how much my upper body has shrunk. (I have not touched a weight since February lol).
 

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Purpose

simonaway427 said:
I'm just going to throw it out there as the devils advocate - buy why don't you ever see pros warming up on rollers?

At TDF, all you see are trainers trainers trainers......
The sole purpose of the race warmup is to warm up. That has nothing to do with the skill building that MANY cyclists need almost as much as they need the workout.
 

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Soft tire damage

dgeesaman said:
Really, doesn't that lead to tire damage?
In short, no. We're not talking about being so soft the rims are bottoming out. Just run 5, 10, or 15 psi less than you usually do. Without any road roughness, you should not have problems as long as you keep your speed reasonable.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
ewitz said:
Think about how you are going to actually rack up some mileage next year.
I really only started in June and I built my mileage gradually. My point in mentioning that is I'm up to about 100mi/week right now and that's several hours per week. That's the time investment I'd like to continue over the winter without wanting to stab myself in the face with a fork out of boredom.

Next year when the long days return I'd like to be in the 100-150mi/week range, health and personal issues permitting.

David
 
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