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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm picking up a new bike Friday and have some tubular questions. I'm mainly a mountain biker, but got a deal I could not pass up on a new road bike. The bike has tubular wheels and I'm looking for some guidance. 1st, from what I've read I should carry a spare tire and since I do not have any used I need to buy a spare so which one?? 2nd, should I put some tire sealant in the tubular tire like I do on my tubeless mtb tires? 3rd what psi range should I run on tubular's? Thanks in advance
 

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I'd buy the same tire you have on the bike or a really cheap Vittoria Rally (glue it up).
There are a lot of folding options (do a web search), I used to fold and tie under the seat, now I fold and tie (shoe lace) and put it in a black wool dress sock with minipump and multi tool. i carry the package in a jersey pocket (sticks out the top a bit - about 8" long). If you are really adventurous you may want to carry a tubular patch kit (regular kit with razor blade, needle, and thread).
You can add sealant to the tires (as long as the valve is removable - valves on the Rallys have a fixed valve).
Pressure depends on the road, your weight, and how you are riding. They will take a lot higher pressure than a clincher. Plenty of threads on this.

If you stick with it you will be in the minority :)
 

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In addition to the above: (i) good idea to stretch the spare before you need to install it on the side of the road. Most use an old Tubular rim, but a clincher will work too. Just stretch it over the rim, air it up, and let is sit a few days. Your thumbs will thank you. (ii) If you don't want to put the spare in a jersey pocket, Arundel makes a bag that will hold a folded tubular, its called the "Tubi" and works really well. (iii) be sure that you have the proper length valve or valve extender on your spare, its no fun to try and switch the extender from your flatted tubular to the new one and not be able to get it to seal properly and you can't inflate the newly mounted spare (iv) I put the same amount of air in my tubulars as in my clinchers even though most will allow for much higher [email protected] lbs, its like riding on a rock.
 

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I hope not.....last one I repaired took several hours of careful work in the garage and overnight drying of the cement to get the rim tape reattached. That's also why I have two sets of tubular wheels hanging in bags in my garage and all my road bikes have clinchers, but didn't think that comment would be too responsive to the OP's post.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
OK. I told the LBS to put a 3rd tire on the side for me. I have an old set of REV-X's that I can stretch the tire on. Thanks for the replies
 

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I hope not.....last one I repaired took several hours of careful work in the garage and overnight drying of the cement to get the rim tape reattached. That's also why I have two sets of tubular wheels hanging in bags in my garage and all my road bikes have clinchers, but didn't think that comment would be too responsive to the OP's post.
You guys are killing me, it's not that tough. What do you think the riders did in the days prior to support vehicles and tire/bike swaps?
 

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Exactly...there has to be one guy that will sit on the side of the road and fix a tubular. Personally, if i had no spare i'd ride the flat one home or hitchhike...but some people have nothing better to do, i guess.
Seriously,
You'd rather trash a rim than spend 30-60 minutes to patch a tubular tire, granted you shouldn't ride it the same as a tire that you let sit after gluing it on, but it will get you home in good order. Especially if you've already used the spare.
As to nothing better to do? I tend to ride areas with a nice view, nothing wrong with enjoying the scenery while taking a break and fixing things. But that's just my perspective, your mileage may vary.
 

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I'll deal with your PM message here.

You promote that folks build their own wheels, but someone has to be "stupid" to patch a tubular tire on the side of the road.
I never used the word "stupid". That's your word. Posting vacations are handed out for name-calling.
I promote home wheelbuilding (just like I promoted tubular repair back when I used them) but I would never promote wheelbuilding on the side of the road.

Please stop sending me pms.
 

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I'll deal with your PM message here.


I never used the word "stupid". That's your word. Posting vacations are handed out for name-calling.
I promote home wheelbuilding (just like I promoted tubular repair back when I used them) but I would never promote wheelbuilding on the side of the road.

Please stop sending me pms.
Thank you for the response, keeping in mind I sent you a PM originally asking you what the issue was. But I didn't get a really response, instead it was "!!!!!!", with your signature block in regards to "stupid people", I obviously mistakenly inferred from your response
"No comment. I don't really want a posting vacation." your PM "!!!!!!", and signature block that I was being categorized.
Rest assured I will not send you another PM.
 

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Back in the day, Pros carried one or more spare tubulars crossed over their backs, but we've progressed a bit since then. I guess they may have stopped to fix a tube if both blew out.

I've ridden tubulars since the early '70s and used to commute on them when I was in graduate school, so I've fixed plenty of them in my time. They also used to cost $12.95.....and were relatively cheap. Today, I just carry a spare with me and fix any flats when I get home. If you want to fix a tubular while on the road, you may certainly do so, but I doubt the OP will feel comfortable or even capable of trying that for at least a while.

I don't even patch clincher tubes on the road, but I will patch them at home. I carry two new tubes in my bag and, if I flat both of them......out comes the cell phone.
 

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I do not agree with having a patch kit. Not worth the time. Much easier to just carry extra tubular and have it ready to be installed. Make sure it is stretched and valve extension is already installed (if needed).

The removal and install only takes about 5 minutes and you are back on the road. I refuse to patch on the side of the road. I rather do that at home, while drinking a beer and listening to music. :thumbsup:
 

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My point was have a patch kit in addition to having a spare, as I've been on a ride where the spare was used and had another flat down the road. Rare but it happens.
 

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My point was have a patch kit in addition to having a spare, as I've been on a ride where the spare was used and had another flat down the road. Rare but it happens.
I have never rode with a patch kit. (Statement is false when talking about clinchers)

With tubulars, I feel like my chances for flats are not as likely. (my own opinion) For me to need to carry a spare and an additional patch kit is a bit much. I think those instances or extreemly slim and not worth having to carry extra. If you want to play it super safe, then I guess you could. I just dont bother.
 

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Where did I say to not carry a spare? I've gone gone through a spare and patched both flats in parallel (waiting for the adhesive to dry).
 
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