Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello everyone, I have been riding for about 4 years. Lately I have been doing a lot of research about my first wheel upgrade, and I am hopeful that some of you all may be able to add to my process with some of your ideas or experiences.

First of all my main bike is a 2014 Felt Z5 which I like a lot. It still has the stock MAVIC CXP-22 wheel set with the stock Shimano 10 speed cassette. I live in the Central California foothills near Yosemite National Park and our roads range between hills and mountains, There is very little flat land unless we travel to the central valley which we sometimes do. The pavement condition varies from decent to poor. I am running Vittoria Rubino Pro Slick tires in 700x25 and I weigh around 180lbs.

The Mavic's have been trouble free, but I am suspecting that my climbing efforts around here will appreciate lighter wheels. My Mavic's weigh around 2100 grams bare, without tires/tubes, skewers, or cassette.

The two wheel sets that have my attention right now are;

1. Vuelta Corsa Superlite's which I would plan to buy on eBay from a seller I have seen recommended highly in this and other forums. (simplydeluxe) They claim to weigh around 1,500 grams and appear to be fine for my weight. They can be found for around $350-$400.

2. Reynolds Stratus Pro Road which Competitive Cyclist currently has on sale for $450. These weigh in at just under 1,500 grams so about equal to the Vuelta's.

What I am wondering is if anyone here has any thoughts for or against these two wheel sets, or if there is something else appropriate in the $500 +/- range that I should be considering.

Also, both wheel sets get good reviews so far as I can find and to me, both wheels look nice. I am curious if there are any compelling reasons to spend the extra on the Reynolds wheels?

Thank you, and I appreciate your input.

70Charger500
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
481 Posts
Hello everyone, I have been riding for about 4 years. Lately I have been doing a lot of research about my first wheel upgrade, and I am hopeful that some of you all may be able to add to my process with some of your ideas or experiences.

First of all my main bike is a 2014 Felt Z5 which I like a lot. It still has the stock MAVIC CXP-22 wheel set with the stock Shimano 10 speed cassette. I live in the Central California foothills near Yosemite National Park and our roads range between hills and mountains, There is very little flat land unless we travel to the central valley which we sometimes do. The pavement condition varies from decent to poor. I am running Vittoria Rubino Pro Slick tires in 700x25 and I weigh around 180lbs.

The Mavic's have been trouble free, but I am suspecting that my climbing efforts around here will appreciate lighter wheels. My Mavic's weigh around 2100 grams bare, without tires/tubes, skewers, or cassette.

The two wheel sets that have my attention right now are;

1. Vuelta Corsa Superlite's which I would plan to buy on eBay from a seller I have seen recommended highly in this and other forums. (simplydeluxe) They claim to weigh around 1,500 grams and appear to be fine for my weight. They can be found for around $350-$400.

2. Reynolds Stratus Pro Road which Competitive Cyclist currently has on sale for $450. These weigh in at just under 1,500 grams so about equal to the Vuelta's.

What I am wondering is if anyone here has any thoughts for or against these two wheel sets, or if there is something else appropriate in the $500 +/- range that I should be considering.

Also, both wheel sets get good reviews so far as I can find and to me, both wheels look nice. I am curious if there are any compelling reasons to spend the extra on the Reynolds wheels?

Thank you, and I appreciate your input.

70Charger500
A little above your price range but well worth it for custom wheels. Will shave 1.3 pounds off your bike if you're into that sort of thing.

I have basically the same bike and did the same upgrade. Me plus my bike use to weigh 200 lbs, now me plus my bike weigh 198 pounds. Does that make a difference up the hills? Nah, but my wheels are sexy as heck.

http://www.novemberbicycles.com/nimbus-ti-select/

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
14,449 Posts
A little above your price range but well worth it for custom wheels. Will shave 1.3 pounds off your bike if you're into that sort of thing.

I have basically the same bike and did the same upgrade. Me plus my bike use to weigh 200 lbs, now me plus my bike weigh 198 pounds. Does that make a difference up the hills? Nah, but my wheels are sexy as heck.

November Bicycles: Race smart. - Nimbus Ti Select

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk
This.

In the grand scheme of things, if you are expecting lighter wheels to make you noticeably faster or make hill climbing easier, you will be disappointed.

However, if getting a new wheelset will make you more enthusiastic about riding, you will want to ride more and as a result, you will get stronger, go faster and find the tough hills easier. So indirectly, you could say a new wheelset will make you climb hills faster. :)

I also believe the rolling weight issue to be overblown. Rolling weight will cause you to accelerate slower, but once you are up to speed, it makes no difference whether your weight is rolling weight or static weight.
 

·
A wheelist
Joined
·
11,324 Posts
This.

In the grand scheme of things, if you are expecting lighter wheels to make you noticeably faster or make hill climbing easier, you will be disappointed.

However, if getting a new wheelset will make you more enthusiastic about riding, you will want to ride more and as a result, you will get stronger, go faster and find the tough hills easier. So indirectly, you could say a new wheelset will make you climb hills faster. :)

I also believe the rolling weight issue to be overblown. Rolling weight will cause you to accelerate slower, but once you are up to speed, it makes no difference whether your weight is rolling weight or static weight.
That.

"Better" wheelsets have far less affect on our performance than the buyer hopes for. Lighter wheels must accelerate faster but that amount is very small and relatively infrequent. If lighter wheels do accelerate faster then one must admit that heavier wheels decelerate slower. So which wheelset will be the "fastest" in the real world? To be honest, people like us as our end of the game should not be concerned about such stuff too. Team Sky's "1%" program of minute improvements would be and they would have mechanics fitting the correct wheels for the day's race.

As Lom says, choose whatever wheels will make you ride more and the effect of that alone will make you faster.

BTW - I have (or have had) wheelsets ranging from very light (for clinchers) 1410g to 32/32 spoked 1852g and many weights (and rim depth sections) in between. And as a long-time keeper of ride average speed data, none of those wheelsets have provided any actual benefit over any other.

The poster should get a nice set of wheels and a great set of tires and pump 'em to the correct (for him) pressures and he'll be in nirvana.
 

·
δanned
Joined
·
7,005 Posts
If you like the November Nimbus Ti wheels, get them sooner than later. November is phasing out the Nimbus Ti hubs, and in the future they will be replaced by White Industries T11s. You'd basically be getting the same hubs but paying more money. If that sounds confusing to you, there is a whole thread on it.

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/wheels-tires/goodbye-nimbus-ti-355191.html
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thank you all for the replies. I did not realize the benefits of upgrading your wheels were so slight.

Sounds like my stock wheels are 99% as good as the upgraded ones I was considering.

Perhaps if I put some cool stickers on mine they'd be just about as effective too (as long as I like the way they look more). Certainly a cheaper option! :thumbsup:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
978 Posts
I ride in the foothills west of Denver, 260+ days yearly for many years. I'm 52 years old & weigh 160 lbs, and notice a big difference when riding a pair of 1400 gram wheels vs an 1800 gram set. The less you are out of the saddle, the less of a difference you will notice in wheelsets. I'm a very punchy rider, sprinting on flats multiple times per ride and constantly in and out of the saddle on climbs.

You might not see a difference in your average speed, but the fun factor is increased with wheels that spin up quickly.

My old bike is a flexy titanium frame, which was completely transformed when I went from a heavy wheelset to a light one. Lighter wheels take less energy to spin up, which lets less energy to be pent up in the frame, in the form of bottom bracket flex. My knees also hurt less for the same reason when riding light wheels.

You simply could not pay me a large enough sum of $$$$ to ride a 2100 gram wheelset on my daily rides. I'm not getting any younger and I'm not going to be able to be a hammer forever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
You may enjoy the feel of another lighter set of wheels, but you won't climb appreciably faster. That gets done with repeated training, losing body weight and continued hill attacks on steeper and longer hills. That said I got rid of my Mavic's and replaced them with Dura Ace C-24's and I do enjoy my climbs more. The wheels just feel great. I'm under no delusions that the C-24's have transformed my legs in any way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,935 Posts
The feel of a 1lb lighter wheel set is hugely different. When I changed my stock Cannondale Synapse wheels for a lighter set of aluminum Reynolds wheels it felt like a totally different bike. I really did not enjoy riding it much before the wheel change, and afterwards it was fun to ride, it accelerated faster for sure. There's too many variables to say if they made me faster on average or not, but they felt faster and that kept me working harder / in the game on climbs with the group I ride with so that probably made me faster if nothing else

The laws of physics say with most of the weight change at the rim (typically) lighter wheels are faster accelerating, with the same power input. Faster accelerating 'feels' faster climbing to me, but may not be noticeably unless you are pretty light weight and it's a steep grade. Of course that all depends on what you call noticeable I suppose. 5 seconds on a 5 minute climb in a competitive spirited group ride is pretty significant to me.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
202 Posts
Upgrading from heavy stock wheels is definitely worthwhile. However, when looking at the best value, or the most suitable wheel in terms of the rider's weight, riding style and budget, making gram-to-gram comparisons on the overall weight of the wheels is not the first nor the last factor that should make or break your decision.

Lightweight alloy wheels with low spoke counts will work better for a 50kg rider than for a 100kg rider. Wheel flex, rubbing on brake pads while climbing out of the saddle, and less predictable stability on high speed descents, are reasons many manufacturers specify weight limits on their lightest wheels. Stress cracks can develop in the rims by the spoke holes, spokes break, re-building may or may not be possible.

More important than "how much does that wheel weigh" is the quality of design, materials and construction. Although a lower rotating mass is easier to accelerate, rolling resistence, rigidity, hub quality and (cough-cough) the rider's fitness and training also contribute significantly to a wheel's ability to spin up faster.

In most riding conditions a wheel's aerodynamic qualities are more important than 50 grams less here or there in its construction. I'd give aero factors (number and shape of spokes, rim profile) as much consideration as weight in terms of upgrading from stock, although these considerations can seem at cross purposes (short of budgeting for carbon rims).

Rim design is definitely the most important factor in a wheel's weight, since the peripheral rotating mass is what actually hits the road to speed up or slow down. Far more important than whether the hub has a heavy steel axle or an alloy axle, as the hub just stays put near the level of the bike's centre of gravity. Thinner spokes weigh less but thicker spokes can make the wheel more rigid. All wheel designs have to compromise different factors within the constraints of their manufacturing costs.

In consideration of all the above, going from 2100 gm Mavic CXP22 build to something lighter, you're more likely to find a better performing wheelset in the 1600-1700 gram range of mid-profile wheels for cheap (ish), than with a 1400-1500 gram flyweight-on-the-cheap build. Fulcrum Quattro LG or Fulcrum Racing 5 LG are among the best value, reasonably light pre-builds out there under $500 currently, as I see it. Of course, custom wheelbuilders have the ability to make a wheels that are as good or better if you throw a bit more money at them, and it's worth every penny.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,935 Posts
2. Reynolds Stratus Pro Road which Competitive Cyclist currently has on sale for $450. These weigh in at just under 1,500 grams so about equal to the Vuelta's.

What I am wondering is if anyone here has any thoughts for or against these two wheel sets, or if there is something else appropriate in the $500 +/- range that I should be considering.

70Charger500
I have a set of Stratus Pro disc wheels and they are nice wheels, no problems with them staying true and the hubs seem decent. I did have a nipple on the front wheel break at about 6000 miles. They are alloy nipples, had the wheel restrung with black brass nipples. They have been used quite a bit in the Winter so maybe the elements took a toll on the nipples, who knows. I have seen them on Ebay new for less than $500 before, but even at 500 it's a lot less than the $750 I paid on sale!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Lots of good insight here, thank you all.

I am currently emailing with the folks at Bicycle Wheel Warehouse and they have recommended their PURE Race wheel set. These seem to be a good mix of stiffness, lightness (1540 grams), practical easy to obtain replacement parts, and a fair price ($450.00).

PURE Race 700c Wheel Set 1540g


I have read many good things about BWW here in this forum, which I why I reached out to them also.

Also, I certainly agree with what so many have said about fitness and losing weight off of the rider being so important. I am continually working on fitness, and so far have lost about 70 pounds riding my bike and tracking all my food.

I am planning to order them this week. :thumbsup:

70charger500
 

·
Banned Sock Puppet
Joined
·
14,449 Posts
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top