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Neophyte
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Mods, if this is more of a Lounge topic feel free to move.

Just hoping people who've gone through it already can help me set expectations for the first year (and beyond, I guess)... first child is due any day now.

Will I:

-Get to sneak out for short rides?

-Get really familiar with that trainer I bought a few years ago but hardly use?

-Never ever get to ride again?

My company has a good bonding leave program, my wife and I plan to stagger our leaves so the baby can have more full-time care the first few months. So for a couple months she won't work and I'm still going to work, then when she's ready to go back I'm off for 8 weeks. I'm thinking that while I'm at home with the little one, I'll be on the trainer more than ever, but don't know if that's even realistic... I've been told every second he's asleep is time that I should be as well...
 

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Congratulations.

It will make riding a lot harder. I originally had this idea that I could just stick a burley baby trailer onto the bike and continue on with life as before. Nope.

Our first-born just started college. Now we are repeating the process with a new puppy. Burley makes dog trailers. I wonder if ...
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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Be prepared to not get a good night's sleep for the next 18 years.

So...probably not very much at all. And remember, every second you're out of the house goofing off on your bike....you wifey is stuck with the screaming caca spraying child.

Having a baby VS having a cat - The Oatmeal
 

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Over time, you'll get into a routine. You may find evenings work, or early in the morning before the baby and wife wake up... But yeah - the trainer will be seeing many more miles for a while.

As your kid(s) gets older, it'll get a bit easier. But don't kid yourself - you'll have conflicts (sports, sleepovers, etc) 'til they're off to college.
 

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Since your life is now over, can we have your bikes?
 

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Congrats.
As I look back I was able to get a lot more riding when they were 10 and under, especially as an infant. Of course it depends a lot on your wife and work schedule. After school sports/activities is very time-consuming and I find my riding time going down until school's out.
I know it's way early but be careful with trainer and young crawlers.
 

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Congratulations! Have a 3 yo now but I have to say I had to take a break from cycling after she was born and just restarted recently when she went to dayschool.

I think there was thread here or some other forum where something about this was discussed. Short answer is yes it will be very difficult to find time. Most babies will be awake often and normal sleep during the first months would be hard to come by for parents. I think trainers would be your best bet and depending on how supportive your wife is with your biking you can probably squeeze in a few short rides, probably during early dawn or late afternoons/evenings. We all need our release once in awhile right?

However, it is important to realize that having kids is a life-changing event and things from here on out will be different (and it's not going to be easier too probably not until they're 18 and out of the house they say), and it might be reasonable to think that cycling would have to take a backseat for family. I guess when they're old enough you can include him/her with your biking as well who knows they might like it as much as you do. All I am saying is enjoy your kid every single moment you can as they will grow up really fast.
 

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Congratulations! I've got 3 kids and while the birth of each one has changed my training routines they haven't ended training for me. The best thing I've got going for me is my wife, who is incredibly supportive of my riding. That, along with finding routines that allow us to have family time and to individually pursue our hobbies has worked well for us. Based on what I've encountered with friends and acquaintances, most spouses aren't as flexible or supportive as mine. I consider myself incredibly fortunate in this regard.

One thing I do try to be consistent about is being willing to get up early to train so I cut into as little family time as possible. Weekdays, I'm often up and back before people are generally awake. The only exception to this is Saturday mornings - I still get up early but don't need to be back at any time so I can get good time and miles in. I guess the other exception is Sunday afternoons when CX season is on. A lot of those are family affairs though, especially now that my 10 yo son is getting into cross as well.

My biggest piece of advice: talk to your spouse and come up with a plan you can both live with. There will be things she wants to do as well, and you both need to support each other and make room for those things, be it biking or whatever. Good luck!
 

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The Velominati refer to this phenomenon as "breeding and blimping."

I found the combination of less frequent biking and horrifically disrupted sleep (which caused me to eat to keep myself awake), as well as trying to get tenure at a major university, made it very easy to pack on the pounds, and I am still trying to get back down to my ideal grad-school weight and fitness.

All joking aside, the kid obviously comes first (instinct and pheremones will take care of that for you), but be sure not to sacrifice yourself in the process. Do whatever it takes to get sleep and proper nutrition. It will be better for you, your wife, and kid(s) in the long run.
 

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Mods, if this is more of a Lounge topic feel free to move.

Just hoping people who've gone through it already can help me set expectations for the first year (and beyond, I guess)... first child is due any day now.

Will I:

-Get to sneak out for short rides?

-Get really familiar with that trainer I bought a few years ago but hardly use?

-Never ever get to ride again?

My company has a good bonding leave program, my wife and I plan to stagger our leaves so the baby can have more full-time care the first few months. So for a couple months she won't work and I'm still going to work, then when she's ready to go back I'm off for 8 weeks. I'm thinking that while I'm at home with the little one, I'll be on the trainer more than ever, but don't know if that's even realistic... I've been told every second he's asleep is time that I should be as well...
Get a trailer. Ride time for you is nap time for the kid and recovery time for your spouse. I always called our trailer my 50 lb. air brake. You'll be slower but you just might get stronger.
 

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Mods, if this is more of a Lounge topic feel free to move.

Just hoping people who've gone through it already can help me set expectations for the first year (and beyond, I guess)... first child is due any day now.

Will I:

-Get to sneak out for short rides?

-Get really familiar with that trainer I bought a few years ago but hardly use?

-Never ever get to ride again?

My company has a good bonding leave program, my wife and I plan to stagger our leaves so the baby can have more full-time care the first few months. So for a couple months she won't work and I'm still going to work, then when she's ready to go back I'm off for 8 weeks. I'm thinking that while I'm at home with the little one, I'll be on the trainer more than ever, but don't know if that's even realistic... I've been told every second he's asleep is time that I should be as well...
You should be able to get in a good ride while your wife is in the delivery room.

I can't add much other than to say every baby is different. Our first one, never napped and we were sleep deprived. The second one took lots of naps and that allowed more time for riding. If you plan to get out and ride, discuss with your wife and also reciprocate by letting her have some time to do stuff she likes
 

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Seat's not level
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It depends on what you work out with your wife.

When my kid was born, my wife didn't have a problem with me riding. I actually trained for and rode the Triple ByPass that year.

My wife was accomodating and encouraged me to stay in shape even though she couldn't ride as normal.

It all depends on communication and agreements between you and your wife.

The big change comes when your kid starts racing.....
 

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Just chill out. You'll adjust, as with anything else in life. Depending on how much you ride now, you'll probably ride less (but maybe you'll enjoy it more). You and your spouse will figure it out as you go along. Everybody will still have a life. And every kid is different, in terms of sleeping patterns, fussiness, etc. No rules.
I'm thinking that while I'm at home with the little one, I'll be on the trainer more than ever, but don't know if that's even realistic... I've been told every second he's asleep is time that I should be as well...
I don't know who told you that, but it's nonsense. Unless you have a colicky baby who demands constant attention whenever he's awake (one of our three was like that), you will not have to sack out every time he nods off. Even a fussy newborn sleeps 12-15 hours a day (though it may be in short chunks); you probably don't need that much sleep.

You'll manage. Good luck and congratulations. It's great that your company will give you that leave. You'll have the "easier" shift in a sense, since the nighttime sleeping has usually gotten a lot better after a couple of months. During that first period when your wife is home with the baby all day, try to do all you can to help at night. If she's nursing, you obviously can't feed the baby in the middle of the night, and I've known guys who say, "then I don't need to wake up at all." Wrong, IMHO. I generally did everything I could during those night-time feedings: change the diaper, etc,, so my wife only had to awaken enough to sit up in bed and nurse the baby, then I get him back to sleep or whatever else is needed, while she goes back to sleep immediately. The physical and psychological demands of pregnancy, birthing and the post-partum period on a mother are beyond our ken. Be a real partner (I'm sure you intend to be).

But sneak out for some short rides, too. We all have needs.
 

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I'd like to chime in with not making any real cycling plans for at least the first 6 months. Routines change so much over that time that you should just simply be there for the kid and the mom and let the bike happen if/when it can.

When routines have settled in then you can push the bike a little higher up on the priority list. It is OK to push a tiny bit for bike time because your health and sanity do benefit your wife and child as well. But make sure it's a plan your wife is not just willing to accept but able to support.

Congratulations!
 

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I didn't ride for the first couple years after my daughter was born.

I had too many other things demanding my time. I was a going to law school full time and my wife worked full time too. Our closest family was about an hour and a half away. So, we were pretty much on our own for the first couple years.

I did get to sneak in some good fishing. We lived about 5 minutes from a decent fishing spot.

As mentioned above, every baby is different, you and the wife have to do whatever works for you, and work has a big influence on your time management.

Now, my kid is nearing high school and I work from home. So, I can squeeze almost as much riding as I would like into my schedule.
 

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Just adding to "every child" is different. The first months with ours ranged from completely crazy to easy. After the small baby months the family is also demanding a lot of time: school, kids birthdays parties!, their sports, homework, etc.

Either way it will be a big change.

What I personally find important is that you do not totally give up on sports. This might be the case for the first months but then I found it is better to have a compensation to relax and get a clear mind (besides staying healthy yourself). This will also be true for your wife and you could come up with a "deal": I let you out for that and you let me out for riding the bike.

See you on Zwift!
 

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Yes, be prepared for changes, (diapers included) sleep deprivation, and more funny moments (pee, poop and puke related) than you thought possible. If you are close enough to work, consider commuting. It was the majority of the riding I did during the first year of each of my children.
 

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Plenty of advice already but I would say the biggest thing for me is/was being flexible and opportunistic.

When I had a specific plan in mind and it didn't happen, I would get frustrated. When I started to just take opportunities to ride when the kids napped or whatever, everyone was happier and I was grateful that I was able to get out.

Not having a plan ends up morphing into a plan as your home routine starts to establish also.
 
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