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I took the free assessment that my gym offers and was surprised to find that my weakest categories were Resting Heart Rate and Aerobic Fintness. Other areas like blood pressure, flexibility, strength etc., were all in the Fit or Excellent category.

Being that I ride fairly often, love climbing, run up flights of stairs, row, among other cardio/aerobic type exercises, you can imagine my surprise at being rated only fair in these two categories. I don't smoke (duh).

I am guessing that maybe I ate too soon before the test along with having rushed home from work beforehand. Maybe I should have rested a bit. Do you think that a high resting heart rate would impact the aerobic fitness score? That score, btw, is 33.6 (ml/kg/min), whatever that means. 86 was my RHR.

At no time did I feel especially stressed or tired while taking the tests. Anybody have any insight into how these things work how the scores are determined? I think the software is Microfit.
 

· Scary Teddy Bear
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Two things..

CBar said:
I took the free assessment that my gym offers and was surprised to find that my weakest categories were Resting Heart Rate and Aerobic Fintness. Other areas like blood pressure, flexibility, strength etc., were all in the Fit or Excellent category.

Being that I ride fairly often, love climbing, run up flights of stairs, row, among other cardio/aerobic type exercises, you can imagine my surprise at being rated only fair in these two categories. I don't smoke (duh).

I am guessing that maybe I ate too soon before the test along with having rushed home from work beforehand. Maybe I should have rested a bit. Do you think that a high resting heart rate would impact the aerobic fitness score? That score, btw, is 33.6 (ml/kg/min), whatever that means. 86 was my RHR.

At no time did I feel especially stressed or tired while taking the tests. Anybody have any insight into how these things work how the scores are determined? I think the software is Microfit.

The aerobic fitness score seems like voodoo to me, it is probably little more than a marketing gimick to get people into the gym. As far as your resting heart rate. You CANNOT take only one measurement to get a resting heart rate. First of all, you should be lying down for a period of at least 15 minutes prior to them even checking your heart rate, otherwise it's not "resting", secondly, you have to take several measurements over a period of days or even weeks to get an average resting heart rate. Personally, wouldn't think anything of either of those numbers beyond a conversational piece.
 

· It's all ball bearings
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CBar said:
That score, btw, is 33.6 (ml/kg/min), whatever that means. 86 was my RHR.
Is that 33.6 ml/kg/min supposedly your VO2max (whatever it is, it's expressed in the same units as those used in VO2max)? If so, 33.6 is quite low (depending on your age), well below average for a typical young (<50), healthy, even remotely trained athlete. That number is extremely suspect. Do you know how they measured it?

As physasst mentioned, the 86 RHR they got is probably not even close to reality. Measure your pulse when you've been sitting on the couch watching tv for an hour... even that will be an overestimate.
 

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As for your "33.6 (ml/kg/min)," that sounds like it's trying to be a V02 max test. If they're not full of crap, you needed to have done the test while exercising to maximal exertion and wearing a properly calibrated oxygen sensor / breath mask thing.

My coach offers V02 max testing both to his athletes, and for a fee to the public at the local gym that he has an office in. Note that they have given you a weight-adjusted measurement, and that it tends to go down with age. The big thing my coach has pointed out is that the average Joe / Jane gets much lower scores than cyclists he coaches, and he suspects that he's not getting Joe's measurement properly because he hasn't truly pushed himself to his maximum on the machine. He also finds that folks who decide to use a treadmill or elipical trainer instead of a cycle tend to do worse, probably for the same reason.

Depending upon your age and weight, 33 ml/kg/min is not out of the range of normal, fairly fit people, but it's definitely on the low side. I improved by 8 ml/kg/min from my first to second tests within 6 weeks, and I'm sure that it wasn't a "real" improvement, just getting the test done better.

As for "true" resting heart rate?

There's a bunch of different ways to measure it, and as long as you're doing the same thing every time, it shouldn't matter too much -- but they all involve lying down. I've seen one that's really interestes in the difference between when you are lying down, having just woken up, and then a few minutes later after you've stood up.
 

· It's all ball bearings
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TurboTurtle said:
I belive that true resting HR is while sleeping. It's just hard for most people to take their pulse while asleep. - TF
Could be, but I remember there being a discussion/argument a while back where someone used their HRM to measure their minimum HR during a night's sleep and the consensus of other posters seemed to be that that was the wrong way of going about it...?
 

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BenWA said:
Could be, but I remember there being a discussion/argument a while back where someone used their HRM to measure their minimum HR during a night's sleep and the consensus of other posters seemed to be that that was the wrong way of going about it...?
I find it is all over the place when I sleep. Althought 60+ avg would probably be too high, and 40-60 might be more normal.

I've seen it drop to 30 for a minute. Surely that isn't my resting. I do figure that any less and I'd be dead.
 

· NeoRetroGrouch
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bas said:
I find it is all over the place when I sleep. Althought 60+ avg would probably be too high, and 40-60 might be more normal.

I've seen it drop to 30 for a minute. Surely that isn't my resting. I do figure that any less and I'd be dead.
You don't want the average, you want the minimum. - TF
 

· NeoRetroGrouch
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BenWA said:
Could be, but I remember there being a discussion/argument a while back where someone used their HRM to measure their minimum HR during a night's sleep and the consensus of other posters seemed to be that that was the wrong way of going about it...?
Actually, it's all about definition. What you want is a number that you can get with the most consistant/representative results. The object is to notice the changes and what that means about your training and fitness. If you get the same amount of sleep most nights and wake without an alarm, a pulse check the first thing is probably some really good information. I just think that the minimum while sleeping would be the most consistant number for most people and some HRMs will record this number. - TF
 

· Call me a Fred
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BenWA said:
not when sleeping, but upon first waking in the morning
OK, What about when the GF awakens me? My heart rate is really fast then!
 

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Resting Heart Rate.... Doesn't help me

I tested mine in April on three different mornings and i received a (34, 32, 41) as the resting heart rate. Every time I go to the doctor the nurses always ask if I am an athlete because my heart rate is so slow. I guess it is normal for me. Other people with resting heart rates of 60-70 whoop my butt all the time though lol. :confused:
 
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