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True symetrical fixed hub?

If you're going with a 120mm rear track hub, flip-flop or not, or any other hub with symetrical axle lengths from the flange, the answer's yes.
 

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Actually, all wheels build pretty much the same, unless you're going to change spoking patterns, number of holes, etc. Even if you're using track hubs, you're going to need to dish the rear slightly, and the front should also be checked for center. So really, they're all the same.
 

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All rear track wheels are not created equal!!!

Rear Track Wheelbuilding 101...

The spokes of the wheel are divided into two kinds, driving (pulling) spokes and trailing (static) spokes. When you sprint, hub windup exerts torque that is drawn against the driving spokes as it pulls the rim around. The driving spokes should always be laced so that they come out of the hub on the outside of the flange (and underneath the corresponding trailing spoke) and the trailing spokes should always be laced on the inside of the hub flange (and over the driving spoke.) When laced in this way, when the driving spokes are pulled tight, they pull against the trailing set of spokes (where they cross) and more evenly distribute spoke tension throughout the wheel. When properly laced, the wheel is stronger, more efficient, less prone to gravitate towards "untrueness", and less likely to promote premature hub/spoke/rim failure.

The prevailing wheelbuilding practice, for roadbikes, is to reverse/split the pattern on the derailleur-side of the wheel (driving spokes inside/trailing spokes outside.) This is done as a saftey precaution to protect the spokes, in the event that the derailleur is pulled into them. Since track bikes have no derailleurs, an identical pattern can be used.

If your wheelbuilding project includes a flip/flop hub, then special consideration should be given to the spoke lacing pattern, since the pattern will be revearsed when "flipped/flopped." If the hub has a freewheel, then the lacing pattern must be exclusively applied to the "fixed" side without consideration to the "free" side. But, if both sides of the hub are "fixed", then a reverse/split pattern (roadbike) should be used so that each drive side is appropriately laced.

-velosavant
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
good info; thanks

velosavant said:
Rear Track Wheelbuilding 101...

The spokes of the wheel are divided into two kinds, driving (pulling) spokes and trailing (static) spokes. When you sprint, hub windup exerts torque that is drawn against the driving spokes as it pulls the rim around. The driving spokes should always be laced so that they come out of the hub on the outside of the flange (and underneath the corresponding trailing spoke) and the trailing spokes should always be laced on the inside of the hub flange (and over the driving spoke.) When laced in this way, when the driving spokes are pulled tight, they pull against the trailing set of spokes (where they cross) and more evenly distribute spoke tension throughout the wheel. When properly laced, the wheel is stronger, more efficient, less prone to gravitate towards "untrueness", and less likely to promote premature hub/spoke/rim failure.

The prevailing wheelbuilding practice, for roadbikes, is to reverse/split the pattern on the derailleur-side of the wheel (driving spokes inside/trailing spokes outside.) This is done as a saftey precaution to protect the spokes, in the event that the derailleur is pulled into them. Since track bikes have no derailleurs, an identical pattern can be used.

If your wheelbuilding project includes a flip/flop hub, then special consideration should be given to the spoke lacing pattern, since the pattern will be revearsed when "flipped/flopped." If the hub has a freewheel, then the lacing pattern must be exclusively applied to the "fixed" side without consideration to the "free" side. But, if both sides of the hub are "fixed", then a reverse/split pattern (roadbike) should be used so that each drive side is appropriately laced.

-velosavant
Will start as soon as I get my ENO hub from Harris. Thanks.

Doug
 
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