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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been lurking in the fixed gear forum for awhile now and about three weeks ago I went to my LBS and bought an IRO Mark V and now I'm hooked. I had the LBS build it up with Vuelta cranks, Sun rims, IRO hubs(they look good) and I put Shimano 105 pedals on so I could use my road bike shoes. I was tempted to build my own but took the safe route for my first fixie. I also had Shimano brakes put on and after putting in some time on the bike I'm comfortable on the fixed gear. I have been a roadie for years but find that in some places I'm about as fast on the fixie. For my next new road bike I guess I don't need 10 speed after all!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

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Yee haw!

jamz50 said:
I've been lurking in the fixed gear forum for awhile now and about three weeks ago I went to my LBS and bought an IRO Mark V and now I'm hooked. I had the LBS build it up with Vuelta cranks, Sun rims, IRO hubs(they look good) and I put Shimano 105 pedals on so I could use my road bike shoes. I was tempted to build my own but took the safe route for my first fixie. I also had Shimano brakes put on and after putting in some time on the bike I'm comfortable on the fixed gear. I have been a roadie for years but find that in some places I'm about as fast on the fixie. For my next new road bike I guess I don't need 10 speed after all!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Good choice on the bike; and I like those hubs, too. You may find that road pedals are a bit of a pain to flip while you're moving since you can't stop pedaling; I ended up getting dual-sided clipless and then finally just went with platforms & toeclips, but you may be more talented than I seemed to be with single-sided pedals. Anyway, welcome to the fixed world. I think you'll find out that there's not much speed penalty at all compared to your road bike as long as the route isn't too hilly and you've chosen your gear carefully. As for your "next new road bike," don't be surprised if you end up with another fixie instead!
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I didn't think about dual sided as I have those on my mountain bike and in retrospect they would have been a better choice....clicking in can be a challenge, especially if you miss on the first time around. I have an Edddy Merckx MX Leader that I have been dying to build up but can't justify the expense....the frame sits in my office on a bookshelf....kind of as a motivator to keep me plowing away on the job....perhaps as a fixie I can bring it to life.
 

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I saw a picture of a Merckx MX, made with the Columbus Max tubeset, the old Motorola paint job, and forward-facing horizontal dropuouts - man, that would make one sweet fixed gear! Since it's obviously torturing you by just sitting on that shelf, perhaps you should send it to me for "safe keeping." I'll even pay for shipping. :)

As for pedals, you might do fine with your single-side road clipless. I just found that if I was starting from a dead stop on any kind of an uphill pitch, I really wanted to get clipped in on the first try. With my MKS platforms, I can just ride on the bottom of them if I don't get it flipped. It's a little weird not having the full ability to "pull" like you can with clipless, but since I use the bike for daily transportation, it's nice to not have to wear cycling shoes and cleats when I go into a store. I think mountain bike pedals and shoes with a recessed cleat probably give you the best of both worlds.
 

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Another Fixed Gear Noob

Do I buy a new one or is it better to get an old steel frame bike and build it up?? What's the diff???

P.S. I'm not very good at the mechanical side of putting a bike together. What do you suggest??
 

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laxman said:
Do I buy a new one or is it better to get an old steel frame bike and build it up?? What's the diff???


Advantages of building your own:

You get something unique and with character
It can be cheaper, depending on how you build it
You'll learn a lot about bikes and get a sense of pride from riding something you made

Advantages of buying one:

You're dealing with a known quantity
All the parts fit, especially the hubs
You can easily get one for between $500 and $1000
I personally prefer track ends over horizontal dropouts

Or just split the difference:
Get a used factory-made one!
 

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Have any fixie-friends

Get some of your fixed freinds to help you out or make real good friends with a mech at your local bike shop. A good attitude and some pizza can go a long ways.
 
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