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The Edge
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just got a brand new Michelin Carbon. In it's first 100 miles I've gotten 3 small but deep cuts through the tread and one puncture. So much for them being tough tires, huh?! The puncture was caused by a really small piece of glass on my last ride right in the center of the tire, about 3mm across. Can I glue a inner tube patch over that spot on the inside of th tire, or I'm I gonna experience more punctures in that same spot as time goes on regaurdless?
 

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niteschaos said:
I just got a brand new Michelin Carbon. In it's first 100 miles I've gotten 3 small but deep cuts through the tread and one puncture. So much for them being tough tires, huh?! The puncture was caused by a really small piece of glass on my last ride right in the center of the tire, about 3mm across. Can I glue a inner tube patch over that spot on the inside of th tire, or I'm I gonna experience more punctures in that same spot as time goes on regaurdless?
What happens when you reinflate the tire? If you can feel a bump, that means you have cut one or more tire cords and the tire is done. Sorry. If the tire feels smooth but the cut seems to open up, some guys treat the cut with superglue to hole it closed.

Personally, I have wheels mounted with different tires that I use selectively. I use Specialized Armadillos for rides in urban areas and anywhere I expect a lot of glass and junk. I save my Michelins for rural areas. Doing that I only get a couple of flats a year but I don't ride nearly the number of miles that some other guys do.
 

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The Edge
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Spoke Wrench said:
What happens when you reinflate the tire? If you can feel a bump, that means you have cut one or more tire cords and the tire is done. Sorry. If the tire feels smooth but the cut seems to open up, some guys treat the cut with superglue to hole it closed.

Personally, I have wheels mounted with different tires that I use selectively. I use Specialized Armadillos for rides in urban areas and anywhere I expect a lot of glass and junk. I save my Michelins for rural areas. Doing that I only get a couple of flats a year but I don't ride nearly the number of miles that some other guys do.
The tire seems to be okay. Still round and everything, but I just got done pulling out another peice of glass that had worked its way into the tread. I'm going to have to get some tire liners. ugh.
 

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hi, I'm Larry
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Take a close look at the cuts

If any of the threads in the cord are cut. Toss the tire, it is toast. No need risking your body on a bad tire. High speed blowouts can be very dangerous.
 

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The web is a MUT
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If you're finding that much glass and debris where you ride you might consider installing some tire savers, either home made or purchased. Basically little scrapers that hover just above the surface of the tire tread and catch on any debris that is coming around which the tire picked up before it gets pushed in further. Some I've seen are just a bent piece of wire attached to the brake bolt on the fork, hardly noticible. Others are flat plastic or card stock. Lots of tourists and commuters use them.
 

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Every little counts...
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Fill the cuts with Shoo Goo or superglue

niteschaos said:
The tire seems to be okay. Still round and everything, but I just got done pulling out another peice of glass that had worked its way into the tread. I'm going to have to get some tire liners. ugh.
Inspect your tires after every ride.

After riding through a bad patch, wipe the tires (while riding) with your glove to get all debris off of the tires. Everyone did this when everyone rode tubulars.

Carbons are a great tire. Mine have cuts down to the cords, I just fill them with goo and don't worry about it. You should not need tire liners unless you ride in alot of thorns, or very bad glass patches.
 

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My policy...

When I start to hem and haw and flipping a coin deciding about the condition of a tire, I just pull it off. It's worth peace of mind. New tires might be more prone to picking up pieces of debris/glass, as the rubber is sticky, but that depends on the brand of tire. I use Shoe Goo to patch up small nicks and cuts, but if I go around my tire and see a whole bunch of patched spots, I replace the tire, but these are usually tires that are at the end of their tread life. I used to make a habit to brush my tires with my gloved hand while riding, but I found it did not make much difference. I do brush if I think I ran over something. I started riding with amber or clear lenses, unless the sun is very bright. Riding solo your more apt to spot what you are riding over, riding in groups you are more focused on other things. I'm very fussy on tires as my "big crash", which laid me up in the hospital for a week, was caused by a blow out with my front tire. I just pay more attention to what is in front of me now and take a look at my front tire before I start a descent. They just cleaned the roads I ride on, which is a twice a year occasion (if that), so all the old glass has been removed, now I just have to watch for the new stuff. But I'm fairly lucky as most of my roads are glass free, I just have to watch out for gravel and small rocks.
Tires are always a pain, but don't let the pain be the type that keeps you off your bike. When in doubt, chuck it.....
 
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