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well, it happenend finally....the rain has been so bad here I geared up and went out on the SS for some iota of training before the seasons first race in 3 weeks...
roads are covered in gravel, sticks, debris from 35+ days of rain in Portland...

and, inevitably, I flatted out around mile 6....with no wrench to take the front wheel off. had to bust out the cell phone for the 2nd time in several years.
What are you guys bringing along and have found what works best for a tire change wrench? something small but with enough leverage to remove the bolts....

need to go shopping...
 

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No matter where you ride you should always have the basics, a pump/Co2, tube and a lever. When I go out on my trackie I throw a small wrench that I cut the open end off. Works great.
 

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Surly Jethro

bahueh said:
well, it happenend finally....the rain has been so bad here I geared up and went out on the SS for some iota of training before the seasons first race in 3 weeks...
roads are covered in gravel, sticks, debris from 35+ days of rain in Portland...

and, inevitably, I flatted out around mile 6....with no wrench to take the front wheel off. had to bust out the cell phone for the 2nd time in several years.
What are you guys bringing along and have found what works best for a tire change wrench? something small but with enough leverage to remove the bolts....

need to go shopping...
Get yourself a Surly Jethro tool. It's a 15mm box wrench and doubles as a bottle opener. They only cost around 15 bucks..
 

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sailwrench said:
Get yourself a Surly Jethro tool. It's a 15mm box wrench and doubles as a bottle opener. They only cost around 15 bucks..

The Jethros are retailing for about $24 these days, but I agree that it's a great tool -- fits your hand, has plenty of leverage, doesn't take up much space, pops open a cold one when you get where you're going.

Budget-minded folks should opt for a $7.00 15mm box wrench from an auto parts store and cut it in half. Wrap the cut end in duct tape and you'll have material to boot a sidewall tear should the need arise.

About ten years ago, my wife bought me a "Cool Tool" that has a small adjustable wrench that opens wide enough for axle nuts but is thin enough for hub adjustment, plus a chain breaker, crank bolt socket, and 5 & 6 mm allen wrenches. I've kept one in my singlespeed bag ever since, and it's darn handy.
 

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Go to your local Sears tool department and look for a Craftsman "Stubby" 15mm wrench. They are identical to a regular wrench, just shorter and fits nicely in a seat bag.
 

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I use thumbs or plastic tire levers.

I get most tires off with no levers at all. Once I'm certain this is true for the wheels on the bike, I leave levers home and just carry a stubby 15mm ratcheting wrench, a spare tube, a patch kit, a few tyvek boots and a pump. Until I'm certain I can get the tires off without levers, I carry two plastic tire levers. Park makes nicer than average ones. Never have figured out how to get tires off with only one lever.
 

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I always have a backpack on when riding my SS, because it is my commuter/around town bike. So, I carry a big-ass full size wrench. It works perfectly and fits fine in the backpack.

If I used the bike for training, and didn't use the backpack, I'd get one of those stubby sears wrenches so it could fit in a jersey pocket.
 

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Peanut Butter

With bonus kid shot for free...

These pop up on e-bay now and then. Nice because they're thin and nothing sharp in pocket. If I didn't have it, I'd go the Craftsman stubby route
 

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Yes indeed.

asterisk said:
Go to your local Sears tool department and look for a Craftsman "Stubby" 15mm wrench. They are identical to a regular wrench, just shorter and fits nicely in a seat bag.
This is the ideal tool for the fixed gear road rider--it's just too nice and too cheap to be a bicycle specialty tool. For about 8 bucks you get something small enough for the smallest seat bag, but big enough to torque the bolts nice and snug--you get both a box end and an open crescent and you get craftsman quality. Nice finish, smooth edges, and no home kludges required. Print "park" on the thing and it'll go for twice the price; print "campagnolo" and you can retire.
 
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