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I purchased my first set of tubular wheels last fall. For the winter, I stuck on a pair of Conti Giros. I blew both tires in the first 50 miles I put on them. I glued on another set, mainly because my LBS owner cut me a really good deal on them because he was a little dismayed at my luck as well. I have switched back and forth between the tubbies and my clincher wheelset all winter. I am not sure how many miles I got out of the 2nd Giro, but I blew it last weekend. Everyone I have talked to tells me that tubbies should be less prone to punctures, so is it the Giros themselves that suck, or am I just having foul luck with them thus far? What are your opinions on the most puncture-resistant tubbies you have tried?

Thanks.
 

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I think it is more what is a cheaper, wallet tolerant tubie? ;)

I am not really helping just to say that I gave up tubies years ago due to the high cost of flatting.

I never really found anything that was more flat resistant, but maybe that has changed in the years since. What I did was basically just ride cheap Conti's that my LBS sold for short change. They were crappy tires, but had a kevlar belt and flatting them didn't hurt the wallet so much.

Good luck on your search...and I hope I didn't come across as being anti tubie, I am not.

EDIT: that being said, you certainly can learn to patch your own, but it is a royal pain in the ass. I can't find the info, but I used to send my flatted tires to a guy (Ron?) in Clearwater Florida. He would replace the tubes, not a patch, but replace and return. IIRC he charged a flat fee for shipping and it was like $15-20 a tire, so you would save up a bunch of flats and send them off to be redone. He did a nice job, new tubes and new liner tape.

EDIT II: google is our friend: http://www.tirealert.com/

HTH
zac
 

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I've been using Vittoria Rally's for over two decades with great success. I've repaired the tires a couple of times over that period and finally replaced the tire due to my laziness in patching it. The Rallys are cheap and cost about $20 … and most folks would merely replace them than repair them. I guess I was frugal in my younger years.... actually still kind of even today as i've had great success with them. I’ve just purchased another 2 pairs for my carbon wheels which I will be using for my daily ride.

Don't get discouraged with tubulars. I have both tubular and clinchers for my bikes, but I primarily use tubulars as I prefer the overall feel.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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i think that cheaper tires are more likely to puncture than quality tires. but...it's obviously more expensive when they do. if you're riding tubulars, winter is a really bad time...way more crap on the road that will cut them up. i hear horror stories all the time from people that have the same experience you did...but seriously, how can 'tubulars' be more prone to punctures than 'clinchers' just because they're tubulars. they're not. just be careful where you ride, stay out of the gutter and ride close to the white line...less junk in the road than in the gutter. if you think you ran over something, wipe your tires off quickly. it seems to me that some people flat a lot, while others don't. i have no answer for why, but that's just the way it is. i never flat. i'm talking 2-3yrs between flats, averaging 4-6k mi/yr. i know people that flat at least once/twice a month, on the same rides. i have no idea why. if you're a 'flat prone guy' then maybe tubulars aren't the set up for you...maybe work on reducing the flats you get on clinchers, then try them...i dunno...the whole thing is a mystery to me! :mad2:
 

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Banned forever.....or not
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Cheap sew ups are worse than cheap clinchers.........much worse.
If you are not able to repair a sew up, stick with clinchers. (unless you are using them for racing)
Any sew up will puncture if you run over a sharp object.
At the minimum, stick on Conti Sprinters or Vittoria CX's.
 

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No Crybabies
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Gatorskins?

I ran a pair of Conti Gatorskin tubulars on my fixed gear for about a year with only one flat. Surprisingly, despite the extra rubber and flat protection, I could not tell much difference between them and Conti Competitions, which cost about twice as much.
 

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I'm a 'clydesdale' at about 100kg and have been riding only on tubulars fro about the last decade. My problem with clinchers was pinch flatting. That isn't a problem with tubulars. Like Grumpy said, though, you need to get comfortable repairing them and gluing them. If I had to take them to a shop to have a new one glued on every time, they definitely wouldn't be worth it. For those mysterious leaks that I can't isolate, I save up three tires and then send them to http://www.tirealert.com/.

Regarding which models, I ride Conti Comps when racing and Sprinter Gatorskins for my training wheels. Gatorskins are fantastic for avoiding flats; I usually wear them down to the cords before ditching.
 
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