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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been getting a lot flats lately. I'm in the process of checking my rim tape, tubes, and tires. However, I'm looking for suggestions on tuff flat resistant tubes, tires, and rim tape for road riding. I'm currently regular weight Forte 700x19-26C. My tire is Michelin Pro race tires, the rim tape, if that is what it is, says Zuaz PlasticoZuaz s.l. fibar 16-622 on it.

Thanks,

Marc
 

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Yes, the rim tape needs to be fixed. The point of rim tape is to cover the holes. What pressure are you running? How are you flatting (pinch flat, running over razor blades, etc.)? I have been fine on my ProRace3's. A heavier tire is usually going to be more flat resistant, so go online and look at weights. There is always stuff like the GatorSkin tire, specifically made to not flat, but it'll ride poorly and you probably won't have as much grip as you do with PR's.
 

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Michelin prorace tires are good for traction, but don't have the greatest puncture resistance. The Michelin Krylion Carbon's have much better flat resistance, but not quite the grip as the prorace. I still race on them (per argentius's recommendation). They will become my standard training tire and the prorace 3's will be my race tire.

Rim tape can make a difference. Swap yours for something that covers those last 3 holes. Or, at the very least, cover it with a few layers of electrical tape.

Tubes: As far as lightweight tubes, I've found the best luck with Bontrager ultralites, unfortunately (Vittoria and Continental were just not up to par). But, anything that is not advertised as lightweight or under 80g is your best bet. No latex.

If you get a series of flats, it's most likely pinch flats from installing the tube improperly. Make sure you partially blow it up when you put it on the rim, put some baby powder on it (for the at-home installs), and squeeze around the tire before pumping it up with air to make sure it is not partially pinched anywhere.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
tire pressure

I'm running 100 psi. The tire says max 116 psi. Would more or less be better? I way 155 lbs. I've flatted while hitting pot holes and going over train tracks. But these are normal routes for me and my set up seems way more sensitive then before. I didn't find any sharp objects in my tire or rim aside from the spoke holes not being totally covered. Also, the edge of the rim tape where it runs over the top of itself seems a bit sharp too. I need to find some instructions on applying new rim tape.

Marc
 

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I use the Performance Thorn Resistant tubes. Very thick rubber, slightly hard to install to get the beat seated especially around the valve.

Rim tape I also use Performance Forte cloth tape. Cloth is the only tape you should use.
 

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mcdelroy said:
I'm running 100 psi. The tire says max 116 psi. Would more or less be better? I way 155 lbs. I've flatted while hitting pot holes and going over train tracks. But these are normal routes for me and my set up seems way more sensitive then before. I didn't find any sharp objects in my tire or rim aside from the spoke holes not being totally covered. Also, the edge of the rim tape where it runs over the top of itself seems a bit sharp too. I need to find some instructions on applying new rim tape.

Marc
100 is toward the high end at your weight. You should not be pinch flatting at that pressure. When you go over stuff like potholes and train tracks, you have to use your body to absorb the impact. Hover above the seat a bit, and let your legs take the brunt of the force. Get the rim strips fixed, and see how it goes. Eliminate one thing at a time.
 

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Diagnosis

mcdelroy said:
I've been getting a lot flats lately. I'm in the process of checking my rim tape, tubes, and tires. However, I'm looking for suggestions on tuff flat resistant tubes, tires, and rim tape for road riding. I'm currently regular weight Forte 700x19-26C. My tire is Michelin Pro race tires, the rim tape, if that is what it is, says Zuaz PlasticoZuaz s.l. fibar 16-622 on it.
From your other comments, it seems that you don't know what is causing your flats. The very first thing you need to do when you get a flat is to figure out what caused it. If there is a single hole on the "under side" of the tube, then it is most likely a rim strip or metal burr problem. By lining up the valve with the wheel, you can see where on the rim the problem rests. If there is a pair of holes on the underside of the tube (snake bite) then you got a pinch flat and need to either run higher pressure, be more careful what you hit, or get wider tires. If the hole is on the "outside" of the tube, then you need to line the tube up with the tire and determine where the flat occured. It might be a piece of glass or wire imbedded in the tire, a rough spot on the inside of the casing, or perhaps a small cut in the sidewall or tread/casing. Mounting your tires so that the label is at the valve hole makes it much easier to track down any holes or puncture sources in the tire.

Until you know what is causing your flats, it's pointless to look for a solution, whether that be a different tire or tube.
 

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My girlfriend had really bad flat tire problems. She switched to the Continental GP 4000 and has been flat free since. The tires have a nice Kevlar casing and there relatively light weight. Concerning tubes, she just uses a regular tube and dosen't have any problems. I use a "thorn" resistant tube on my commuter bike and it was a b*** to install. However, I don't get any flats, but I wouldn't recommend putting anything like that on a race bike. ;)
 

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Look for tires that have a kevlar belt. They are generally very flat resistant. Also, you said you do hit potholes and traintracks. If that is the case, get a 25mm tire instead of a 23mm. They will provide much more cushion against pinch flats. I'm a big guy [275lbs] and a wider tire is a must, but it's also great for smaller riders that ride rougher roads. You won't notice much difference in rolling resistance, but since volume of the tire is nearly double that of a 23, pinch flats will be way, way less likely.
 

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Inspect the inside of the tire for punctures and debris. Some people I have seen run an inflated balloon along the inside of the tire. Like said inspect your blown tubes to see what the culprit is and where. I have had problems using the stem nuts and refuse to use them. They have a tendency to pull the stem into the rim stem hole or vibrate loose causing you to continue to tighten them.

My Ksyrium's don't have require a rim strip however the stem holes were very sharp and cut one tube and the other wasn't far behind. Deburring the hole and a small piece of cloth rim tape took car of that.
 
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