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Anyone have any data on what % of flats happen on front vs back.

..and if large % is front..does anyone ever run a tubular on the back and clincher on the front cause fixing a clincher while out on a ride is "easy" compared to a tubular.

Thanks
 

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I'd guess ~3 rear flats for every 1 on the front. More weight and more torque squirm on the rear is probably the reason.
 

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While not an answer to your question, it is not all that difficult, and sometimes faster, to switch tires on a tubular rim "in the wild". I had to do it yesterday. I switched tires faster than the guy swithched tubes just a few miles before. The catch being I had to ride 30 miles, including a mountain descent in high wind, on an unglued tire. The descent was not technical at all, and I took it easy. I still topped 40 mph with out the tire every budging. After this incident, I am totally comfortable with riding tubbies as everyday wheels and caring a spare tire with me.
 

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My spare tubular is always a previously used, pre-glued tubie. The residual glue on the old tubie usually gives more than ample holding power for everything except the most extreme high speed shenanigans.

All bets are off with the speed of repairing a flat if you have gone over to the dark side of the much dreaded glue-tape. That and you will have NO supply of old used tubies to use as spares. All your old tires will be TRASHED when you try and take them off after using glue tape.

Oh, and I'm like 50/50 front to rear. Most of my flats are from road debris.
 

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Damage to the tire aside, is it easier or harder to remove a tubie that has been glue taped vs. rim cement?

Oh, and it seems to me that I see mostly front flats.
 

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2007TarmacSL said:
Anyone have any data on what % of flats happen on front vs back.

..and if large % is front..does anyone ever run a tubular on the back and clincher on the front cause fixing a clincher while out on a ride is "easy" compared to a tubular.
There are theories out there about how your front tire can hit something and flip it up so that the back tire catches it and punctures, but that seems more mental masturbation than any real data/logic. IME, front and rear flats are random, because all of my flats are from glass/wire bits and not from pinch flats. Running a tubular/clincher mix would mean having to carry both a spare tubular and a spare tube + patches & tire levers. Makes no sense to me.
 

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eRacer
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Murphy's Law; Flats are always on the Rear, because that's the tube that is the hardest to change.:thumbsup:
 

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Just my experience

Conti UltraSport Front, Bontrager Hardcase rear, 100% front in 1000 + miles

Conti Gatorskin Front, Conti UltraSport rear, 100% rear in 600+ miles

I no longer ride Conti UltraSports...
 

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Cpark
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I can recall only one flat on the front last 10+ years.
All other flats have been in the rear.
I'd say 10/90 ratio.
 

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cpark said:
I can recall only one flat on the front last 10+ years.
All other flats have been in the rear.
I'd say 10/90 ratio.
That's pretty much my experience.

Not to beat a dead horse, but its one of the reasons I have such a problem with the 'its better to have fresh tires in the front' skool of thought. 55-60% of your weight is on the back, and ALL the power goes thru there. Now splain to me where you want the crappy tire again?!

'Course them that *believe* won't listen...

M
 

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MShaw said:
Now splain to me where you want the crappy tire again?!

'Course them that *believe* won't listen...

M
I am probably 20% front punctures and 80% rear punctures. One of those front punctures was on the steepest hill in these parts, but fortunately it was dead straight and I miraculously avoided a spill. Another of those front punctures was on a less steep downhill corner (maybe 10% grade) and I was instantly thrown off at 30mph onto the road and ended up in emergency care. That's why my new tires go on the front.
 
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