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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
When I bought my Centurion (used) about 12 years ago, it came with a flickstand (Rhode Gear). It's basically a clamp on the downtube with a wire that folds down to lock the front wheel in place making it really easy to lean the bike on anything with no worries that it will fall over.

Fast forward to my newly acquired Trek 5000 (again, used) and I've come to realize just how much easier that flickstand makes life. I'm not sure I would want to use one on a carbon bike (maybe it wouldn't hurt, I don't know), but I'd love to find something similar.

Does anyone know of anything similar to this? Pardon me if this is in the wrong forum or considerd Fredly. I figure I'm already the biggest poseur in town, so that doesn't bother me too much.

Mark
 

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I had a Flickstand (in byegone days) and it was a very handy tool. I think it would be hard to market one these days because there are so many proprietary tube shapes and frame geometries that it would be hard for the flickstand to fit properly.
 

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dadwhobikes said:
When I bought my Centurion (used) about 12 years ago, it came with a flickstand (Rhode Gear). It's basically a clamp on the downtube with a wire that folds down to lock the front wheel in place making it really easy to lean the bike on anything with no worries that it will fall over.

Does anyone know of anything similar to this? Pardon me if this is in the wrong forum or considerd Fredly. I figure I'm already the biggest poseur in town, so that doesn't bother me too much.
As I posted back in March:

I use a gimmick for "parking" my bike. It's simply a big rubber band holding the front brake closed. This pretty much prevents the wheel from rolling - which is the usual cause of a parked bike crashing.

View attachment 135041

The rubber band is cut from an old tube. Make it wide enough to provide a good grip on your brake. When not parking, leave the band on your bar - you may have to double it over to ensure it doesn't fall off.

WTTW - remember to release the brake before trying to roll. BTW, this trick could hinder the grab and go thief.
 

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Thanks S.T.Rider, that's a really good tip. I don't usually have an issue with this - until the bigger club rides, charity events, etc. The few good "leaning spots" always go quick. I usually just circle slowly or stand holding my bike. . .Man, I can't believe the number o' nice bikes I've watched fall over in that situation. That's when I can use this one!
:thumbsup:
 

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ordinary elastic band

here's one I use on the workstand and sometimes when parking, using a 2-3inch ordinary rubber band to 'lock' my front wheel.

1. roll front wheel so valve stem is positioned adjacent to down tube
2. hook rubber band around valve stem,
3. stretch free end around down tube,
4. hook free end around valve stem.

wheel won't roll. easy, quick, cheap. works with all tube shapes, rim profiles and valve stem lengths, you just have to choose a suitable sized rubber band.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the two tips. I'll give them a shot.

I just had an idea of using a piece of styrofoam wedged between the front tube and the front tire. I've got lots of foam laying around from my other obsession and could do some prototyping. Perhaps something that could be made with fiberglass or carbon fiber, which I also have. Not something permanently attached to the bike, but something I could leave in the garage. Now I have something to think about at work today....
 

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I just lay my bike down, drivetrain up. A lying bike cannot fall.


Fantino said:
Thanks S.T.Rider, that's a really good tip. I don't usually have an issue with this - until the bigger club rides, charity events, etc. The few good "leaning spots" always go quick. I usually just circle slowly or stand holding my bike. . .Man, I can't believe the number o' nice bikes I've watched fall over in that situation. That's when I can use this one!
:thumbsup:
 

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I used to have a flickstand on all my bikes - here's my old Gitane with the flickstand and other 80's accessories still installed :D

FYI - I saw lots of EXPENSIVE bikes laying on their non-drivetrain side at all of the centuries I've been to this summer. Made me nervous at first - then I got used to it and set my Madone down on it's side when a stable "lean support" was not available. No damage from laying it down.
 

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This is one of the last of the great inventions for cyclists ever. I was looking for a replacement and ended up on ebay, but found one and snatched it up. Ive had my bick loaded down with front & rear pannies, a bag above the front and rear tires and a map/essentials bag on the handlebars. It never fell no matter the weight. Worth every penny.
 

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When I bought my Centurion (used) about 12 years ago, it came with a flickstand (Rhode Gear). It's basically a clamp on the downtube with a wire that folds down to lock the front wheel in place making it really easy to lean the bike on anything with no worries that it will fall over.

Fast forward to my newly acquired Trek 5000 (again, used) and I've come to realize just how much easier that flickstand makes life. I'm not sure I would want to use one on a carbon bike (maybe it wouldn't hurt, I don't know), but I'd love to find something similar.
Does anyone know of anything similar to this? Pardon me if this is in the wrong forum or considerd Fredly. I figure I'm already the biggest poseur in town, so that doesn't bother me too much.Mark
I am 60 years old and we always called them "kickstands" whether they were on a motorcycle or bicycle, because you kick them out and back in with your foot.

I use the kickstand on my steel framed road-bike bike all the time when I have to park it somewhere, I am sure the bike was equipped with it when it was new and it is still on there doing it's job. There is no good reason to not have one on any bike that is used regularly for transportation, but there are a lot of bad reasons not to have one. If you are a pro-racer with a chance to win, then not having a stand and it's extra weight make sense, but if you have no chance of winning money or prizes in any form of racing them there is no reason to not have one. I did my last time-trials with the stand on the bike and I am sure it made zero difference, especially since I usually weight over 200 pounds myself, I could have two dozen extra stands in my messenger bag and keep the same average speed on a ride.
 
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