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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Well, since we finally agreed that disk brakes are the best brakes ever for road bikes, we can now proceed to the next dilemma, potentially as controversial at the previous one.

Floating brake rotors on road bikes. Are they worth it? Internet claims that floating aluminium+steel rotors are lighter than uniform steel ones, which expectedly should make them a hot topic in the road cycling world.

More specifically, are the current floating brake rotor offerings immediately usable on road bikes, or is there something MTB-specific about them?
 

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Who agreed???

Road Bikes?????....Define Road Bikes?...Would you mean commuter bikes? JRA bikes??

All my bikes have "HUGE" discs on them.....25" huge, C to C.

Yes, there are "some" uses that tend to support the use of disc brakes.
 

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Well, since we finally agreed that disk brakes are the best brakes ever for road bikes, we can now proceed to the next dilemma, potentially as controversial at the previous one.

Floating brake rotors on road bikes. Are they worth it? Internet claims that floating aluminium+steel rotors are lighter than uniform steel ones, which expectedly should make them a hot topic in the road cycling world.

More specifically, are the current floating brake rotor offerings immediately usable on road bikes, or is there something MTB-specific about them?
Floating rotors on a bicycle don't exist. True floating rotors in the motorcycle world float laterally. They also brush against the pads; not something you want on a bicycle as it causes drag and noise.
 

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The way I blow through brake rotors, I would hate to see them made of any softer material than they are currently.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Floating rotors on a bicycle don't exist. True floating rotors in the motorcycle world float laterally. They also brush against the pads; not something you want on a bicycle as it causes drag and noise.
The idea of a floating rotor on a bicycle has nothing to do with lateral float. No, bicycle floating rotors don't float laterally.

Apparently, the primary purpose of floating rotor on a bicycle is to make it better resist thermal deformations, i.e. heat up without warping. If you look at the current floating rotor offerings (of which there are plenty, despite what was stated by the other poster above), they all have straight radial rotor spokes. That is as opposed to swept/spiral rotor spoke configuration we always see on single-piece rotors. Apparently, the thermal effect is there, if manufacturers believe it is possible to abandon the spiral spokes on floating rotors.

Also, the advertised benefit is weight savings, for those who care about it that much (and yes, such people do exist :) )
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The way I blow through brake rotors, I would hate to see them made of any softer material than they are currently.
The "business" part of floating rotor is still made the same material - steel. It is only the hub and spokes that are made from aluminum. Different kinds of floating rotors separate the hub from the ring at different radii. So, unless you literally break your rotors in halves, floating rotor should make no impact on longevity (could be more expensive per-piece, of course).
 

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The idea of a floating rotor on a bicycle has nothing to do with lateral float. No, bicycle floating rotors don't float laterally.

Apparently, the primary purpose of floating rotor on a bicycle is to make it better resist thermal deformations, i.e. heat up without warping. If you look at the current floating rotor offerings (of which there are plenty, despite what was stated by the other poster above), they all have straight radial rotor spokes. That is as opposed to swept/spiral rotor spoke configuration we always see on single-piece rotors. Apparently, the thermal effect is there, if manufacturers believe it is possible to abandon the spiral spokes on floating rotors.

Also, the advertised benefit is weight savings, for those who care about it that much (and yes, such people do exist :) )
I don't think there is any significant weight difference. For instance, the Hayes lightweight solid steel rotor weighs less than their floating Prime rotor. I've never warped a rotor so I think that supposed advantage is bunk also. It is also unclear that spiral spokes do anything special either. Floating rotors don't conduct heat to the aluminum arms very well, so temperatures can run higher leading to brake fade. Rivets/buttons can loosen causing noise.
 
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