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So, I went to the doctor today, and I was informed I have Peroneal Tendonitis. I have been cycling for 7 years, and have never had an issue with my feet before. The only thing I changed recently were my pedals from Speedplay (can't remeber the series) to Look Keo Max2 Carbons. The problem started about a month and a half after I switched the pedals, and the problem is only in one of my feet. My question is this, was this problem due to the fact the Look pedals have only 4.5 degrees of float and the Speedplay pedals have 15 degrees of float?

Thanks for any help someone can offer.
 

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The float is supposed to give your foot more of a versatile position. I doubt that it was the pedal, but rather an overuse that is common in athletes. Follow your doctors orders and hopefully he prescribed some physical therapy after a pain reliever-anti selling drug. Hope you get better.
 

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However, if the cleat is not adjusted properly, it can cause issues. Look does have cleats with more float if you desire too.
 

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what area of the tendon/foot is most painful?

doesn't present itself as being a lateral float issue as much as a longitudinal stability issue or perhaps adjustment in saddle height not made to accommodate change in relative height of pedal body to spindle.

wr7r said:
So, I went to the doctor today, and I was informed I have Peroneal Tendonitis. I have been cycling for 7 years, and have never had an issue with my feet before. The only thing I changed recently were my pedals from Speedplay (can't remeber the series) to Look Keo Max2 Carbons. The problem started about a month and a half after I switched the pedals, and the problem is only in one of my feet. My question is this, was this problem due to the fact the Look pedals have only 4.5 degrees of float and the Speedplay pedals have 15 degrees of float?

Thanks for any help someone can offer.
 

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Rollo Tommassi said:
doesn't present itself as being a lateral float issue as much as a longitudinal stability issue
Agree. There's no way for me to know what caused the injury. But one cause is excessive dorsiflexion, which basically means bringing your toe up towards your shin too far too many times ("heel down rider"). Improper sadddle height can certainly cause excessive dorsiflexion ("digging"). Another cause could be a cleat that's mounted too far forward. A forward cleat makes it more probable that you drop your cantilevered heel, especially when tired. The further forward the cleat, the longer that cantilever.
 
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