Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 2 of 2 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,173 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
All...

I got a fitting about 2 months ago, and during the process, my seat was slammed really forward and up. This was to try to reduce some pain in a surgically repaired knee that is missing a lot of cartilage. At this point, the pain is not really gone and is more related to mashing big gears in the hills, so it is easy to avoid the problem. My question now is that since I am such a thick guy,(5"11", 215lbs) I always feel like the front of my bike is overweighted and always feel like I am not tracking correctly. This is painfully obvious in tight corners and steep downhills.

This issue did not occur when I originally got my bike or and previous bike in that I sat with the saddle farther back. Right now, I have a measurement of exactly 35" from the pedal top to the saddle top. So that I don't ruin that saddle to pedal relationship, is it possible to move my seat back and down and achieve that same distance, but fix my balance problem? I currently am running either a 100mm or 110mm stem depending on the day, but I don't fell much difference in them. I would be happy to go shorter if need by to counteract the balance problem. I am thinking that I will go back 1 cm at a time and try it for a week. Does this sound feasable?

The Flash....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,749 Posts
Generally...

There is a formula for moving your seat aft or forward and how it relates to your saddle height, but I don't know it. Generally, when you push your saddle aft you are raising your saddle height. If you push your saddle forward you are lowering it. Depending on how much you move your saddle aft you will have to lower it to compensate. I kinda do things by feel.

When you do your measurement for you saddle height it should be from the center of your BB to the top of your saddle, following the line of your seat tube. Some measure to the front of the saddle.

You could try having someone help you with your KOPS position and start off in a neutral position and then see how that feels. Or just put your saddle dead center in the middle of it's rails and see how it feels and adjust from there. I don't use KOPS myself, I just know from prior experience and a lot of experimenting where to set my saddle.

I think the secret about saddle position is more about balance. I'm back on my bike after recovering from hip surgery and I had to reset my saddle position and went through about 3 or four saddles intill I found the right spot. I ended up pushing my saddle back and lowered it a couple of mm's. A couple of mm's will make a big differece.

Dial in your saddle position first, then start fooling around with your stem length.
 
1 - 2 of 2 Posts
Top