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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm replacing the Ritchey WCS fork on my Dean, I think. It's a little light for the kind of racing I do. I want something with a little more heft and precision.

My choices right now are Reynolds Ouzo Pro and Wound Up w/carbon steerer. (Recommendations are welcome, I guess, but I'm sticking within this vein.) Can anyone offer the pros/cons of either/or? Reynolds is probably a little more comfy, but does that mean the Wound Up is stiffer? I'm not too worried about taking out the road shock with a flexy fork, but a little bit of *damping* would be OK. I've heard Reynolds' construction makes for a softer ride, but how does their construction differ from "other" manufacturers?

Lastly, how light can steel go? Under ~650g? I need an 11" steerer, for what it's worth. Thanks - S.
 

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Wound-Up since 1998....

A Quote from Spectrum-Cycles site

"Wound up for WoundUp

The excitement at Spectrum and Merlin over the WoundUp fork is both real and well founded. It took me a few hundred meters into my first ride on the WoundUp a number of years ago to figure out that we had something special here. It took a couple hundred miles to fully appreciate the fork though. Of course my first reaction to the fork was, UGLY! In any case, it is pretty odd looking at best and downright unattractive at worst. Once on the bike though it doesn't look too bad.

Now to what the fork does. Ultimately, the single biggest advancement by WoundUp over other after market forks is the torsional rigidity of the blades and fork as a whole. Most people assume that fork stiffness is most important in resistance to lateral forces. Actually, this is not the case. Torsional rigidity is considerably more important because sufficient lateral stiffness is very easily built into a fork while torsional rigidity is not. Try to picture what lateral forces do to a fork in the real world. There, you have a front hub clamped onto the front drops keeping them parallel. With that hub in there, lateral deflections will, by definition, force the blades to deflect in a "S" shape curve, not a "C" shape curve. What this means is that forks (in the real world) are about twice as laterally stiff as you feel when you squeeze the drops together. Torsional stiffness is tougher though. The front hub, as a part of the fork structure, only helps by forcing the two blades to work in tandem as they resist torsional stresses.

You might ask "what torsional stresses?" Actually, torsional stresses are not all that great, but they can really cause a fork to feel vague if not addressed. Take the Time Club fork as an example. Although it is very light and eminently comfortable, it is torsionally quite flexible. It is a great fork for putting on the miles. The problems develop when you put it in stressful situations. For example, hairy descents and hard criterium cornering can really stress the Club. Under these situations, the Club fork will make you feel as though you are not connected to the front wheel. Indeed, it seems as though there is actually a lag time between handlebar input and bike reaction. You loose the immediacy if input.

With a good competition fork like the Reynoldsl or Real fork, this is not the case. The WoundUp is the next step. While the Real and Reynolds forks are great forks and I would not have expected anything more, the WoundUp is clearly a better high performance fork when the going gets "on the edge."


Plus I think it looks great on my bike....what do you think? And it does have a carbon steerer but I am using a shim...1 inch head-tube. I used to run a threaded Wound-Up
1 inch with a steel steerer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Nice. That's what I wanted to hear, I think. It's going to be either the Wound Up or a custom steel, hopefully with a sloping lug crown and straight legs.

Instead of that, though, maybe I'll troll eBay for one of these:

<img src='https://velonews.com/images/int/9720.14346.f.jpg'>
 

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SDizzle said:
Nice. That's what I wanted to hear, I think. It's going to be either the Wound Up or a custom steel, hopefully with a sloping lug crown and straight legs.

Instead of that, though, maybe I'll troll eBay for one of these:

<img src='https://velonews.com/images/int/9720.14346.f.jpg'>

Twrek... the Dell of bicycles. I think I'll make that my theme for the week.
 

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It sounds like you have decided sorta, but...

just in case. I would love to have a nice light steel fork, and I have looked around a bit, but the problem is that although there are some really nice steel frame tubes nowadays, fork blade development doesn't seem to have kept pace. Not much call for it I guess. Bottom line, unless someone is doing something stealthy, you are not likely to find a light, strong steel fork of cutting edge steel.

I have heard little about the WoundUp except some concerns about the blade/crown junction. Several manufacturers of frames and forks have had some problems with the CF/metal junction, and I personally am not convinced that they have it settled.

I was reluctant to put a CF fork on my steel bike, but I have been pleased with the balance between the steel Gunnar frame and the Ouzo Pro fork. The fork handle very well and does ride acceptably well.
Good Luck.


SDizzle said:
I'm replacing the Ritchey WCS fork on my Dean, I think. It's a little light for the kind of racing I do. I want something with a little more heft and precision.

My choices right now are Reynolds Ouzo Pro and Wound Up w/carbon steerer. (Recommendations are welcome, I guess, but I'm sticking within this vein.) Can anyone offer the pros/cons of either/or? Reynolds is probably a little more comfy, but does that mean the Wound Up is stiffer? I'm not too worried about taking out the road shock with a flexy fork, but a little bit of *damping* would be OK. I've heard Reynolds' construction makes for a softer ride, but how does their construction differ from "other" manufacturers?

Lastly, how light can steel go? Under ~650g? I need an 11" steerer, for what it's worth. Thanks - S.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Yah, I have pretty much made up my mind. I bought a Wound Up today, at least. (eBay, $166 shipped!)

I start a job at a very, very nice framebuilder on Friday (doing finishing/build work), so I'm thinking I'll have a friend (who is actually a builder) whip up a nice lugged steel job, and I'll learn something in the process. If it's nicer than the Wound Up, the WU will be get sold.
 
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