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How many of you are riding a rig with the fork steerer cut all the way to the bottom? What I mean by this: NO SPACERS? Look at a Pro's bike and they are all like this.

I'm just curious. I'm about to cut my Issac down so that I will have no spacers. It just feels weird riding a bike with spacers when I have not done so for years. I train in the drops 95% of all my rides. So I really like being in a nice tucked position. I'd like to hear your thoughts and experiences for those who ride like this too.
 

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That's basically the way I ride all of my bikes (and spend about 90% of my time in the drops)....but then I have short legs and a tall body so my seat height is lower in comparison to others, which means I need a shorter head tube....which necessitates a low stem height.

Even with my stem all the way down, I generally need it to go lower. I run a -17 degree stem on my Scott, a -10 degree stem on my Curtlo, a -10 degree stem on my cross bike and a -6 degree stem on my TT bike....Even my MTB has a -6 degree stem all the way down.

The biggest problem with cutting the steerer tube to look correct is it can hurt resale value of the bike since it will limit the adjust-ability of the frame for prospective future buyers since they may need a taller stem height.

If however, you don't sell bikes all that often....it's not big deal, is cleaner and looks better.
 

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My cr1 is setup the same way no spacers -6 degree stem, It took me about 2 months to find that position but I really like it, its' comfy and fast and i have no intentions of rasing my bars, unless I get old and less flexy, but hey Im only 29 so hopefully thats a long way off. I run my 29er singlespeed the same way -6 stem with no spacers, it gets some funny looks but the saddle to bar drop is no different than it was on my 26er. Do what feels comfortable to you.
 

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Adorable Furry Hombre
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So long as you never intend on selling your bike, or losing back flexibility....
 

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I preferred to go -17 on the stem and keep spacers under the stem. It can never hurt to have adjustment options. I currently run a -6 and that gives me 2" of drop with a 1cm spacer. A -17 stem with 1.5cm of spacers will give me 2 1/2" of drop. My fork has room for 2cm of spacers, so I keep the rest of the spacers on the top of the stem.
 

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The CR-1 Scotts have an exceedingly tall head tube. It was the only frame I rode with the stem right down on the headset.

Normally I have maybe 3/4" +/- spacers under the stem. You can, if you want to make sure before you cut or are worried about diminishing your prospective buyers later on, simply leave the steerer un-cut and put some spacers over the stem. I usually do this for a period when I first get a new frame..I build it up to my known measurements but leave the steerer tube at least 1/2" long and ride it for a period until I am sure I won't want the bars raised up. Then I cut the steerer tube again to the proper height..
Don Hanson
 

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Trek recommends at least a 5mm spacer between the top cap and the stem to minimize "point loading", where all the lateral forces are concentrated at one point. (I know, the George Hincapie/Paris Roubaix jokes are coming, but he had crashed earlier, the team car couldn't get him a spare bike quickly so he soldiered on - probably the fatal mistake.)

Regardless, it makes sense to me.
 

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+1 on leaving spacers above

My advice is to:

1. Set your bike up however you need to for the fit you want/need. Do not worry about aesthetics (the fashion police) or "what the pros" ride.

2. Leave some spacers on top of the stem to preserve future adjustment options.

3. A thin spacer under the stem is probably a good idea for the reasons sited by others.
 

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Easton recommends a 1cm spacer on their carbon forks, underneath the stem and spacers above. That information isn't in the owners manual that comes with the fork but is on their technical page on the website. So it maybe a more of a cover their as_ , void the warranty kind of thing.
 
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