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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, everyone. I am looking for a new bike that will last a little while, I currently ride a Giant OCR 3. It was a great first bike to learn on. I dont want this to be a v.s. thread. I might want to race in a year, and will be riding a century in the summer. I am looking a Pinarello Galileo and a canondale R1000. The Canondale is all aluminum (carbon fork), and the Galileo has a carbon rear triangle and carbon fork. Do bikes like the Galileo with carbon and aluminum last as long as an all aluminum bike? Thanks Andrew
 

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largegiant04 said:
Hi, everyone. I am looking for a new bike that will last a little while, I currently ride a Giant OCR 3. It was a great first bike to learn on. I dont want this to be a v.s. thread. I might want to race in a year, and will be riding a century in the summer. I am looking a Pinarello Galileo and a canondale R1000. The Canondale is all aluminum (carbon fork), and the Galileo has a carbon rear triangle and carbon fork. Do bikes like the Galileo with carbon and aluminum last as long as an all aluminum bike? Thanks Andrew
Unless you crash or seriously mistreat it, any commercially available bike will outlast your ability to ride. A crash is a completely random event that might hurt one bike more than another, but unless you can pre-determine which sort of crash you are going to have, it's not something you can base a decision on. And if you can pre-determine your crashes, just stay home that day (and call me about the lotto numbers that day.)
 

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may be so but may be not. How much is your life worth?

Interesting question. Some bicycle companies give you a life time warranty on their frame and fork yet most others limit it so 3-5 years (Look, Bianchi, Giant etc). I have always been uneasy and confused about one particular part of this deal - the forks.

There is a popular belief that carbon (or even alloy?) forks should be replaced every now and then, where this "now and then" period varies a lot based on rider's weight, strength and type of riding. Yet companies like Trek, Specialized and Time, to name a few, give you a life time warranty on their forks. Whom do we trust and are these companies not exposing themselves to litigation? Or perhaps replacing carbon forks every now and then is a waste of money, provided there have been no crashes, of course ?

I presume this advice may also apply to frames - carbon and alloy. Perhaps in bicycle terms (like dog years?) a life-time means ~5 years for most of non-elite, non-pro riders and even less for elite riders with racing and long annual mileage.

*Personally* I look to replace my carbon frame and fork every 5 years or ~50,000 km, whichever comes first. In case of alloy frame I would make that 3 years and ~50,000km. Yes, I know many of you have longer lasting rides but that is just me. Many of us replace our cars every ~5 years and these road hogs cost a great deal more money so why not a new road bicycle every 5 years also?

This is another reason I would never buy a second-hand bicycle unless I personally knew and trusted the original owner (and even then I would not).

Comments welcome.

Caveat Emptor 8^)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Henry Chinaski said:
My guess is all of those will last a good long time assuming you don't crash them or weigh a lot. Lot of variable, though...
I weight 148 and 6' 2 or 3", and might race in the near future. I want to ride a few centuries in the summer. Thanks for the replies.
-Andrew
 
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